2

How can I have a conditional sum in kdb, something like the following sql query

Select sum(qty > 0, qty, 0) as buy, sum(qty < 0, qty, 0) as sell from trades

I am looking for a way to do this without any where clause.

  • 1
    Can you share your expected output - not sure what the sql is supposed to be doing... – Chromozorz May 12 '17 at 5:32
5

You can achieve this using a lambda function inline on your select statement:

q)trades:([]sym:`a`b`c`d`e`f`g;qty:-34 -27 -11 50 19 -30 1)
q)select buy:sum {x where 0<x}[qty], sell:sum {x where 0>x}[qty] from trades
buy sell
--------
70  -102

Better method (with conditional):

q)select buy:sum ?[qty>0;qty;0], sell:sum ?[qty<0;qty;0] from trades
buy sell
--------
70  -102

Using 'min' and 'max' operators:

q)select buy:sum qty|0f,sell:sum qty&0f from trades
buy sell
--------
70  -102
  • great, thanks. exactly what I was looking for – chrise May 12 '17 at 10:02
4

I would follow the first method proposed by @davidcrossey, but would simplify code a bit and remove anonymous functions:

select buy: sum qty where qty > 0, sell: sum qty where qty < 0 from trades

This query is preferable, because ?[;;] works slower and consumes more space (~ 2 times). min/max approach is probably faster but consumes x2 space as well. You may use next code as performance test, \ts returns time space used by the query

trades: enlist[`qty]!enlist -50 + 1000000?100;
\ts select buy: sum qty where qty > 0, sell: sum qty where qty < 0 from trades
// returns 43 8389424
\ts select buy:sum ?[qty>0;qty;0], sell:sum ?[qty<0;qty;0] from     trades
// returns 68 17826560
\ts select buy:sum qty|0f,sell:sum qty&0f from trades
// returns 39 16777856
-1

In this case < & > are acting as vector conditional operators, hence passing the full columns works. However, there are cases where a function needs the inputs as atoms, in that case, each can be used.

q)trades:([]sym:`a`b`c`d`e`f`g;qty:-34 -27 -11 50 19 -30 1)
q)select buy:sum qty where {0<x}each qty, sell:sum qty where {0>x} each qty from trades
buy sell
--------
70  -102

You can now replace {0<x} to some more complex function that takes atoms as parameters and it should work fine.

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