0

Let's say that I have some Polygon classes (I won't do any sanity check for conciseness):

Base class -> Polygon:

public abstract class Polygon {
    private final int height;
    private final int width;        

    public Polygon (int h, int w) {
        height = h;
        width = w;
    }

    public int perimeter () {
        return (height + width) * 2;
    }
}

Child class -> Square:

public class Square {
    public Square (int s) {
        super(s, s); 
}

Child class -> Rectangle:

public class Rectangle {
    public Rectangle (int h, int w) {
        super(h, w);
    }
}

Now if have an ArrayList or any other data structure:

ArrayList<Polygon> m_arrList = new ArrayList<>();

Then I put some polygons in the ArrayList, without any order. What if I want to sort it now, but differently depending on some arguments:

  1. Use a different type of sorting (merge, bubble, etc).

    How can I create a sort (ArrayList<Polygon> al, some argument) method which will sort the array depending on the second argument? I could use some hardcoded values, but that's isn't to appealing to me.

  2. Sort the polygons by their height or their width

    Again, a method, taking as arguments the ArrayList and another argument that would specified the sort criteria. I could use hardcoded values here too, but again not so appealing.

I'm trying to avoid the hardcoded values in cases the classes change, i.e, they now contain colors, price, etc. If I want to sort them base on other properties such as prices, I'd have to dive in the code and change everything manually. And that wouldn't be good practice in my opinion.

Am I overcomplicating (?) this? I read a bit about Comparator this morning, I'm merely grasping the concept for now, could they be useful here? I don't think I used interfaces before, but I'm willing to read a bit about them, if that's part of the solution.

3
  • but what can some argument be? May 12, 2017 at 6:19
  • @ΦXocę웃ПepeúpaツIn fact I don't know. I don't know if Java already have some available tools for that. I just don't want to use something like a string or an interger.
    – Nhatz HK
    May 12, 2017 at 6:21
  • java is a powerful language, the sky is the limit! May 12, 2017 at 6:22

5 Answers 5

6

The method already exists. List.sort(Comparator) eg.

m_arrList.sort(Comparator.comparingDouble(Polygon::getWidth);

Or even.

m_arrList.sort(Comparator.comparingDouble(Polygon::getHeight);

You can write your own comparator too.

m_arrList.sort((a,b)->Double.compare(a.getWidth(), b.getWidth()));

If you need to use your own algorithm, then you can just take a comparator as the argument.

public <T> void someSortOfSort(List<T> polygons, Comparator<T> comparator){
    //Then for comparing elements.
    T a = ...
    T b = ...
    int r = comparator.compare(a,b);
    if(r>0){

    } else if( r<0){

    } else{
       //they're equal
    }
}
8
  • Ah it's the comparators then, thanks. What about using a different type of sorting?
    – Nhatz HK
    May 12, 2017 at 6:26
  • What do you mean by a different type of sorting? As in the sorting algorithm?
    – matt
    May 12, 2017 at 6:27
  • Yes sorting algorithm. I could use the basic List.sort(Comparator) but I'm required to use specific algorithms.
    – Nhatz HK
    May 12, 2017 at 6:29
  • I would recommend that you write your algorithm, but use the comparator to make the comparison. Then just pass the comparator as the argument.
    – matt
    May 12, 2017 at 6:32
  • 1
    @NhatzHK correct, I hope. It is a generic Parameter, so you can call the method using a List<Polygon> or a List<Number> and the list will be sorted with the algorithm based on the order described by the Comparator. It can be a challenge to write comparators. It should be transitive.
    – matt
    May 12, 2017 at 6:41
1

Java 8 Functional Interface already has predefined facilities to apply sorting on Collections such as your ArrayList. As the solution offered by @matt. But also for more robust functionality, you can choose to convert your ArrayList into a stream and then apply your filtering arguments sequentially for sorting your ArrayList.

Consider this example.

List<Polygon> processed_list = 
m_array_list
           .Stream()
           .filter(s -> s > 250.62)
           .sort(Comparator.comparingDouble(Polygon::getWidth))
           .Collectors.toList();
0

alternative to Matts answer you can add sintax sugar using the power of the enumerations...

consider this example, a class

class Point {
    private int x;
    private String name;

    public Point(int x, String name) {
        this.x = x;
        this.name = name;
    }
}

then an enum that can compare points:

enum ComparatorCriteria implements Comparator<Point> {
    BY_NAME {
        @Override
        public int compare(Point o1, Point o2) {

            return o1.getName().compareTo(o2.getName());
        }
    },
    BY_X {
        @Override
        public int compare(Point o1, Point o2) {
            return Integer.compare(o1.getX(), o2.getX());
        }
    }

}

and then the implementation:

  List<Point> t = new ArrayList<>();

    t.add(new Point(45, "mono"));
    t.add(new Point(1, "zoo"));
    t.add(new Point(88, "alpha"));
    t.add(new Point(32, "path"));
    System.out.println("Original list: " + t);
    Collections.sort(t, ComparatorCriteria.BY_NAME);
    System.out.println("By Name: " + t);
    Collections.sort(t, ComparatorCriteria.BY_X);
    System.out.println("By x: " + t);

your output can look like:

Original list: [Point [x=45, name=mono], Point [x=1, name=zoo], Point [x=88, name=alpha], Point [x=32, name=path]]

By Name: [Point [x=88, name=alpha], Point [x=45, name=mono], Point [x=32, name=path], Point [x=1, name=zoo]]

By x: [Point [x=1, name=zoo], Point [x=32, name=path], Point [x=45, name=mono], Point [x=88, name=alpha]]

0
  1. Use a different type of sorting (merge, bubble, etc).

    How can I create a sort (ArrayList<Polygon> al, some argument) method which will sort the array depending on the second argument? I could use some hardcoded values, but that's isn't to appealing to me.

Create an interface for your sorting algorithm. Then you could have as many implementations of that interface as you whish.

But: The entire sorting logic would be implemented in that interface implementation and your method sort (ArrayList<Polygon> al, SorterInterface argument) would degenerate to a simple delegation:

public void sort (ArrayList<Polygon> al, SorterInterface sorter){
  sorter.sort(this);
}

I would not consider that being useful and remove this sort method in favor of the one of the SorterInterface implementation.

  1. Sort the polygons by their height or their width

    Again, a method, taking as arguments the ArrayList and another argument that would specified the sort criteria. I could use hardcoded values here too, but again not so appealing.

Java already has the Comparator interface serving this purpose which can be passed as argument to almost any sorting method in the standard lib.

0

Sorting type example: Declare a enum SortType with possible sorting options. Implement a sorting method for each enum value. Then add your sort method that accepts the array and this enum:

enum SortType
{
    SQUARE {
        @Override
        public Comparator<Object> getComparator() {
            return new Comparator<Object>() {

                @Override
                public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {
                    // Implement your sorting type. Not applicable for sorting algorythmss
                    return 0;
                }
            };
        }
    },
     WEIGHT {
        @Override
        public Comparator<Object> getComparator() {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub
            return null;
        }
    };

    public abstract Comparator<Object> getComparator();
}

And sort method:

public void sort(List<Object> list, SortType sortType)
{
    Collections.sort(list, sortType.getComparator());
}

Note: use your Polygon type instead of Object type in generics

Also note, that similar approach can be used to implement different sorting algorythms.

3
  • You don't implement a sorting algorithm in the comparator.
    – matt
    May 12, 2017 at 6:31
  • Thanks for the answer. Would you add a usage exemple to clarify please?
    – Nhatz HK
    May 12, 2017 at 6:35
  • However, as @matt has stated, this example is not applicable to sorting algorythms. You need to use some interface for this May 12, 2017 at 6:37

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