1

I have the following associative array of column data:

$where = array(
    'id'=>array(
        12,
        13,
        14
    ),
    'date'=>array(
        '1999-06-12',
        '2000-03-21',
        '2006-09-31'
    )
);

I need to transpose / rotate the structure to be an array of rows (with merged column data assigned to their respective row). I don't need the column names in the result.

Expected output:

$comb = array(
    array(12, '1999-06-12'),
    array(13, '2000-03-21'),
    array(14, '2006-09-31')
);
0
4

Solution 1: Hope this simple foreach to get the desired result

Try this code snippet here

<?php
ini_set('display_errors', 1);
$where = array('id'=>array(12,13,14),'date'=>array('1999-06-12','2000-03-21','2006-09-31'));

$result=array();
foreach($where["id"] as $key => $value)
{
    $result[]=array($value,$where["date"][$key]);
}

Solution 2: Here we are using array_walk to achieve the same result

Try this code snippet here

<?php
ini_set('display_errors', 1);
$result=array();
$where = array('id'=>array(12,13,14),'date'=>array('1999-06-12','2000-03-21','2006-09-31'));

array_walk($where["id"], function($value,$key) use(&$result,&$where){
    $result[]=array($value,$where["date"][$key]);
});
print_r($result);

Solution 3: Here we are using array_shift on $where["date"].

Try this code snippet here

<?php
ini_set('display_errors', 1);
$result=array();
$where = array('id'=>array(12,13,14),'date'=>array('1999-06-12','2000-03-21','2006-09-31'));

foreach($where["id"] as $value)
{   
    $result[]=array($value,  array_shift($where["date"]));
}
print_r($result);
3

As Kris Roofe stated in his deleted answer, array_column is indeed a more elegant way. Just be sure to put it into some kind of a foreach loop, similar to what Sahil Gulati showed you. For example, like this:

$result = array();

foreach($where['id'] as $k => $v)
{
  $result[] = array_column($where, $k);
}

The var_dump output of $result is exactly what you're looking for

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(12)
    [1]=>
    string(10) "1999-06-12"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(13)
    [1]=>
    string(10) "2000-03-21"
  }
  [2]=>
  array(2) {
    [0]=>
    int(14)
    [1]=>
    string(10) "2006-09-31"
  }
}
0
2

I've completely re-written my answer because it was unnecessarily bloating this page. Truth is, there is a very clean and native way to handle this specific task of "transposing". Using null as the function argument and passing in the two known rows from the input array is all that is required.

Code: (Demo)

$where = [
    'id' => [12, 13, 14],
    'date' => ['1999-06-12', '2000-03-21', '2006-09-31']
];

var_export(
    array_map(null, $where['id'], $where['date'])
);

Output:

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 12,
    1 => '1999-06-12',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    0 => 13,
    1 => '2000-03-21',
  ),
  2 => 
  array (
    0 => 14,
    1 => '2006-09-31',
  ),
)

For anyone that truly needs a dynamic solution (because the number of rows may fluxuate/change and you don't want to keep maintaining the processing code), then I recommend that you check the version history of my answer.

11
  • 1
    Your one-liner inspired me to write a small blog post. A comment here would have been too long, so I posted it over in my blog :) May 14 '17 at 0:19
  • I don't have anything to argue with your post. The truth is, your way is faster as you have proven. But I didn't boast speed; I only mentioned that it has the option of not putting a new variable into the scope and doesn't need an initial declaration. IMO, this benefit has the same importance as shaving a nanosecond off the performance time. As for readability, I don't refute that either. I have been using iterating functions on arrays for long enough that they are easy for me to comprehend. Is it showing off? Maybe it is, but I was only showing some alternative methods to show diversity. May 14 '17 at 6:00
  • 1
    Don't take it personally, I wrote "showing off" with a bit of humor, not evil sarcasm :) My main point was respect for the team members, cuz I've seen such one-liners in the project I've been doing for the last 7 months... Scary stuff. Environment - php 7.0.18 in clean docker container based on jessie, ran merely 5 times each test just to prove the point. May 14 '17 at 8:03
  • 1
    Actually, I think you should read this Jul 23 '17 at 17:04
  • 1
    @Alex Some time later, I've returned to trim down my solution further. Now, my newest snippet is using a null callback. I don't know about performance, but the code golfers should prefer it. Just thought I'd ping ya. Mar 30 '19 at 12:33

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