210

To generate a random number between 3 and 10, for example, I use: rand(8) + 3

Is there a nicer way to do this (something like rand(3, 10)) ?

4
  • 4
    def my_rand(x, y); rand(y - x) + x; end
    – Theo
    Dec 9, 2010 at 5:49
  • @Theo, y - x + 1, by the way.
    – Nakilon
    Dec 9, 2010 at 7:01
  • 1
    Try your correct answer on 10 and 10**24 as limits :0 will be very very long awaitng :) Dec 9, 2010 at 7:19
  • 6
    This works: rand(3..10)
    – eikes
    Jan 15, 2015 at 11:34

8 Answers 8

357

UPDATE: Ruby 1.9.3 Kernel#rand also accepts ranges

rand(a..b)

http://www.rubyinside.com/ruby-1-9-3-introduction-and-changes-5428.html

Converting to array may be too expensive, and it's unnecessary.


(a..b).to_a.sample

Or

[*a..b].sample

Array#sample

Standard in Ruby 1.8.7+.
Note: was named #choice in 1.8.7 and renamed in later versions.

But anyway, generating array need resources, and solution you already wrote is the best, you can do.

8
  • Thanks! I think I'll stay with the old and the good method :) Dec 9, 2010 at 7:12
  • 34
    This is a really bad idea, especially if your a and b are of unknown sizes. Try (100000000000000000..100000000000000).to_a.sample and see what I mean : )
    – pixelearth
    Sep 16, 2011 at 22:06
  • 4
    @pixelearth, if you have better idea, which accords the question, you are welcome to post.
    – Nakilon
    Sep 17, 2011 at 1:54
  • rand(a..b) doesn't work, it splits: TypeError: can't convert Range into Integer. It's not even supported in Ruby 2.0
    – fguillen
    Mar 9, 2013 at 16:00
  • 2
    @fguillen It works for me in 1.9.3, I don't know why it's not working for you. Dec 18, 2013 at 18:35
88
Random.new.rand(a..b) 

Where a is your lowest value and b is your highest value.

3
  • 4
    The important difference to note is that if you just call rand() you are calling Kernel#rand, which only supports a max argument. If you want to pass a range, you have to use Random#rand, meaning you have to implement this way. +1
    – grumpit
    Jan 17, 2013 at 3:06
  • 2
    should add that the above applies to 1.9.2
    – grumpit
    Jan 17, 2013 at 3:20
  • does it include a and b ?
    – Abhradip
    Oct 24, 2016 at 7:39
13
rand(3..10)

Kernel#rand

When max is a Range, rand returns a random number where range.member?(number) == true.

13

You can use range operators. Do note the difference between the two forms:

3..10  # includes 10
3...10 # doesn't include 10
1
  • This should probably be a comment instead of an answer, but it's also a very important distinction so I gave it an upvote anyway. :) Jan 28, 2023 at 20:03
5
def random_int(min, max)
    rand(max - min) + min
end
3

See this answer: there is in Ruby 1.9.2, but not in earlier versions. Personally I think rand(8) + 3 is fine, but if you're interested check out the Random class described in the link.

3

For 10 and 10**24

rand(10**24-10)+10
1
3

And here is a quick benchmark for both #sample and #rand:

irb(main):014:0* Benchmark.bm do |x|
irb(main):015:1*   x.report('sample') { 1_000_000.times { (1..100).to_a.sample } }
irb(main):016:1>   x.report('rand') { 1_000_000.times { rand(1..100) } }
irb(main):017:1> end
       user     system      total        real
sample  3.870000   0.020000   3.890000 (  3.888147)
rand  0.150000   0.000000   0.150000 (  0.153557)

So, doing rand(a..b) is the right thing

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