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I've got to solve a synchronization problem between two processes and I've got to do it with signals.

Two processes should do a given amount of work, and then signal the other one. This will happen indefinitely.

What happens with my code is:

I send a signal to the parent process, who sends a signal to the child process, who sends a signal to the parent process again, whom is halted and doesn't act anymore.

Ideally, parent and child should signal each other indefinitely.

int main () {
    parent_pid = getpid();

    pid_t pid = fork();
    if (pid < 0) {
        syserr_quit("fork error");
    } else if (pid == 0) {
        signal(SIGUSR2, child_work);
        while (1) {}
    } else {
        child_pid = pid;

        signal(SIGUSR1, parent_work);
        while (1) {}
    }
}

void child_work (int signo) {
    sleep(1); // fake child work

    if (kill(parent_pid, SIGUSR1) < 0) syserr_quit("kill error");

    // wait for parent signal
    pause();
}

void parent_work (int signo) {
    sleep(1); // fake parent work

    if (kill(child_pid, SIGUSR2) < 0) syserr_quit("kill error");

    // wait for child signal
    pause();
}

Can't figure out what's wrong since it's a really small amount of code and everything seems to be in place to me.

If somebody wants to spin it up on their machine, here's a full demo that works after a copy/paste.


Update: sigaction(3) instead of signal(2)

As per some comments, I resort to the use of sigaction to avoid race condition and stopped using sleep in the demo. Docs state that to avoid signal reception from being blocked during the execution of a handler, one must set the SA_NODEFER flag.

Code still behaves faulty, only this time is the child that stops receiving signals.

Snippet is the same as above with the exception of signal being swapped – both times – with

struct sigaction action;
action.sa_handler = parent/child_work;
action.sa_flags = SA_NODEFER;
sigaction(signo, &action, NULL);

Full code

To start the signaling, check the from the console and send a signal (i.e. kill -SIGUSR1 <parentid>)

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>

void parent_work(int signo);
void child_work(int signo);

void syserr_quit(char *msg);

pid_t parent_pid;
pid_t child_pid;

int main () {
    parent_pid = getpid();
    printf("parent pid: %d\n", parent_pid);

    pid_t pid = fork();
    if (pid < 0) {
        syserr_quit("fork error");
    } else if (pid == 0) {
        struct sigaction action;
        action.sa_handler = child_work;
        action.sa_flags = SA_NODEFER;
        sigaction(SIGUSR2, &action, NULL);
        while (1) {}
    } else {
        child_pid = pid;
        printf("child pid: %d\n", pid);

        struct sigaction action;
        action.sa_handler = parent_work;
        action.sa_flags = SA_NODEFER;
        sigaction(SIGUSR1, &action, NULL);
        while (1) {}
    }
}

void child_work (int signo) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i); // fake child work

    // signal parent that a write is now possible
    printf("send signal to %d\n", parent_pid); fflush(stdout);
    if (kill(parent_pid, SIGUSR1) < 0) syserr_quit("kill error");
    printf("signal sent\n"); fflush(stdout);

    // wait for parent signal
    pause();
}

void parent_work (int signo) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i); // fake child work

    // signal child that a read is possible
    printf("send signal to %d\n", child_pid); fflush(stdout);
    if (kill(child_pid, SIGUSR2) < 0) syserr_quit("kill error");
    printf("signal sent\n"); fflush(stdout);

    // wait for child signal
    pause();
}

void syserr_quit(char *msg) {
    perror(msg);
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}

Fin

Alright, guys it seems the updated code didn't work just because I didn't correctly initialize the sigaction mask. It must be done with sigemptyset and you can find out why right here.

More details in the answer.

  • As presented, your code will not even compile. The signal handlers reference undeclared variables, and all of your functions call undeclared function syserr_quit(). This is a good start on a minimal reproducible example, but it's not there yet. – John Bollinger May 15 '17 at 14:18
  • @JohnBollinger Let me read that. In the meantime, I provided a full, 60 lines working demo in the last line of the question. – doplumi May 15 '17 at 14:21
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    Not sure if this is connected to your problem (because your code will not compile), but quote from the Linux signal(2) man page: "Avoid its use: use sigaction(2) instead.". man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/signal.2.html – cdarke May 15 '17 at 14:21
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    btw. never perform complex work in signal handlers but only set flags etc. – Ingo Leonhardt May 15 '17 at 14:25
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    "If the disposition is set to a function, then first either the disposition is reset to SIG_DFL, or the signal is blocked (see Portability below), and then handler is called with argument signum." Start by using sigaction and reducing your handler to nothing but a flag increment as previously suggested. – ikegami May 15 '17 at 14:27
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It seems the updated code didn't work just because I didn't correctly initialize the sigaction mask. It must be done with sigemptyset and you can find out why right here.

Correct initialization of a sigaction for a signal that you want to be able to catch while the handler is executing would be:

struct sigaction sa;
sigemptyset(&sa.sa_mask);
action.sa = handler;
action.sa = SA_NODEFER;
sigaction(signo, &sa, NULL);

Final code

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>

void parent_work(int signo);
void child_work(int signo);

void syserr_quit(char *msg);

pid_t parent_pid;
pid_t child_pid;

int main () {
    parent_pid = getpid();
    printf("parent pid: %d\n", parent_pid);

    pid_t pid = fork();
    if (pid < 0) {
        syserr_quit("fork error");
    } else if (pid == 0) {
        struct sigaction sa;
        sigemptyset(&sa.sa_mask);
        sa.sa_handler = child_work;
        sa.sa_flags = SA_NODEFER;
        sigaction(SIGUSR2, &sa, NULL);
        while (1) {}
    } else {
        child_pid = pid;
        printf("child pid: %d\n", pid);

        struct sigaction sa;
        sigemptyset(&sa.sa_mask);
        sa.sa_handler = parent_work;
        sa.sa_flags = SA_NODEFER;
        sigaction(SIGUSR1, &sa, NULL);
        while (1) {}
    }
}

void child_work (int signo) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i); // fake child work

    // signal parent that a write is now possible
    printf("send signal to %d\n", parent_pid); fflush(stdout);
    if (kill(parent_pid, SIGUSR1) < 0) syserr_quit("kill error");
    printf("signal sent\n"); fflush(stdout);

    // wait for parent signal
    pause();
}

void parent_work (int signo) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i); // fake child work

    // signal child that a read is possible
    printf("send signal to %d\n", child_pid); fflush(stdout);
    if (kill(child_pid, SIGUSR2) < 0) syserr_quit("kill error");
    printf("signal sent\n"); fflush(stdout);

    // wait for child signal
    pause();
}

void syserr_quit(char *msg) {
    perror(msg);
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
}
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When your SIGUSR1 signal handler parent_work is called, the SIGUSR1 signal is either mapped to SIG_DFL (default signal handling) or ignored for the parent process (ref. signal) :

When a signal occurs, and func points to a function, it is implementation-defined whether the equivalent of a:

signal(sig, SIG_DFL);

is executed or the implementation prevents some implementation-defined set of signals (at least including sig) from occurring until the current signal handling has completed.

When the child process then generates the SIGUSR1 signal again for the parent process, it will not invoke the parent_work signal handler again for that reason.

So, in your signal handler, you need to re-register the signal again if you want subsequent signals to also be handled by the signal handler :

void parent_work(int signo) {
    /* your handler code */
    signal(signo, parent_work);
}

Note that this still leaves room for a race condition - ie. if the second SIGUSR1 arrives before the signal handler was re-registered. But really, that's intrinsic to your design.

There are of course better alternatives, and general advice. Some of which have been mentioned in comments already, so I will just refer to those if you're interested.

  • 1
    Note that the implementation-definedness inherent in the behavior of a signal handler registered via the signal() function is resolved by instead using sigaction() to register the handler. Moreover, this mechanism makes it unnecessary for the handler to re-register itself (depending on which option is selected), and therefore allows the race condition to be avoided. – John Bollinger May 15 '17 at 14:52

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