10

I am receiving data from a data source which I need to pivot before I can send the information to UI for display. I am new to concept of pivoting & I am not sure how to go about it.

There are two parts to the problem:

  1. forming the header
  2. Pivoting the data to match the header

Things to keep in mind:

  1. I have certain columns which I do not want to pivot. I call them static columns.

  2. I need to pivot certain columns to form multi level header info. I call them dynamic columns

  3. Some columns needs to be pivoted which contains actual values. I called them value columns.

  4. There is NO limit on number of dynamic, static and value columns one can have.

  5. It is assumed that, when data comes, we will first have data for static columns then dynamic columns & then for value columns.

    See the attached image for more information.

enter image description here

Dummy data:

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var _staticColumnCount = 2; //Columns that should not be pivoted        
            var _dynamicColumnCount = 2; // Columns which needs to be pivoted to form header            
            var _valueColumnCount = 1; //Columns that represent Actual value        
            var valueColumnIndex = 4; //Assuming index starts with 0;

            List<List<string>> headerInfo = new List<List<string>>();
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product Three", "Item Ten"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product Two", "Item Five"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product Two", "Item Seven"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product Two", "Item Nine"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product One", "Item One"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product One", "Item Two"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product One", "Item Four"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product One", "Item Six"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product One", "Item Eight"});
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> {"Product One", "Item Eleven"});


            List<List<string>> data = new List<List<string>>();
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item One", "579984.59"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Two", "314586.73"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item One", "62735.13"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product Two", "Item Five", "12619234.69"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product Two", "Item Five", "8953713.39"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Two", "124267.4"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item Four", "482338.49"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Four", "809185.13"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Four", "233101"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item Two", "120561.65"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Six", "1517359.37"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Six", "382590.45"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Eight", "661835.64"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product Three", "Item Three", "0"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Eight", "0"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product Two", "Item Five", "3478145.38"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item Six", "0"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product Two", "Item Seven", "4247059.97"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product Two", "Item Seven", "2163718.01"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product Two", "Item Seven", "2158782.48"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product Two", "Item Nine", "72634.46"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product Two", "Item Nine", "127500"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item One", "110964.44"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product Three", "Item Ten", "2064.99"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Eleven", "0"});
            data.Add(new List<string> {"Global", "Asia", "Product Two", "Item Nine", "1250"});


        }
    }
  • what's the difficulties? – Lei Yang May 16 '17 at 2:53
  • @LeiYang: I am not sure how to go about it. What is the optimized way to achieve the result – OpenStack May 16 '17 at 2:56
  • 4
    then what's your non-optimized way – Lei Yang May 16 '17 at 2:57
  • 1
    As you wrote, the type of the input is List<List<string>> (not the best, but ok). But what is the intended type of the output? – Ivan Stoev May 22 '17 at 15:55
  • 1
    @IvanStoev: I chose List<List<string>> because I thought it would be lite weight & I don't know how many rows and columns of data I will receive. I could have used DataTable but I think its little expensive. As far as output is concern, you can check the attached image about how I want to show data. As far as type of output is concern, it can be List<dynamic> type. I am interested in desired result & not the type. – OpenStack May 22 '17 at 17:56
9
+100

What you call static columns is usually called row groups, dynamic columns - column groups and value columns - value aggregates or simple values.

For achieving the goal I would suggest the following simple data structure:

public class PivotData
{
    public IReadOnlyList<PivotValues> Columns { get; set; }
    public IReadOnlyList<PivotDataRow> Rows { get; set; }
}

public class PivotDataRow
{
    public PivotValues Data { get; set; }
    public IReadOnlyList<PivotValues> Values { get; set; }
}

The Columns member of PivotData will represent what you call header, while the Row member - a list of PivotDataRow objects with Data member containing the row group values and Values - the values for the corresponding Columns index (PivotDataRow.Values will always have the same Count as PivotData.Columns.Count).

The above data structure is serializable/deserializable to JSON (tested with Newtosoft.Json) and can be used to populate UI with the desired format.

The core data structure used to represent both row group values, column group values and aggregate values is this:

public class PivotValues : IReadOnlyList<string>, IEquatable<PivotValues>, IComparable<PivotValues>
{
    readonly IReadOnlyList<string> source;
    readonly int offset, count;
    public PivotValues(IReadOnlyList<string> source) : this(source, 0, source.Count) { }
    public PivotValues(IReadOnlyList<string> source, int offset, int count)
    {
        this.source = source;
        this.offset = offset;
        this.count = count;
    }
    public string this[int index] => source[offset + index];
    public int Count => count;
    public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            yield return this[i];
    }
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() => GetEnumerator();
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {
            var comparer = EqualityComparer<string>.Default;
            int hash = 17;
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
                hash = hash * 31 + comparer.GetHashCode(this[i]);
            return hash;
        }
    }
    public override bool Equals(object obj) => Equals(obj as PivotValues);
    public bool Equals(PivotValues other)
    {
        if (this == other) return true;
        if (other == null) return false;
        var comparer = EqualityComparer<string>.Default;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            if (!comparer.Equals(this[i], other[i])) return false;
        return true;
    }
    public int CompareTo(PivotValues other)
    {
        if (this == other) return 0;
        if (other == null) return 1;
        var comparer = Comparer<string>.Default;
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            var compare = comparer.Compare(this[i], other[i]);
            if (compare != 0) return compare;
        }
        return 0;
    }
    public override string ToString() => string.Join(", ", this); // For debugging
}

Basically it represents a range (slice) of a string list with equality and order comparison semantics. The former allows to use the efficient hash based LINQ operators during the pivot transformation while the later allows optional sorting. Also this data structure allows efficient transformation w/o allocating new lists, at the same time holding the actual lists when deserialized from JSON.

(the equality comparison is provided by implementing IEquatable<PivotValues> interface - GetHashCode and Equals methods. By doing that it allows treating two PivotValues class instances as equal based on the values in specified range inside the List<string> elements of the input List<List<string>>. Similar, the ordering is provided by implementing the IComparable<PivotValues> interface - CompareTo method))

The transformation itself is quite simple:

public static PivotData ToPivot(this List<List<string>> data, int rowDataCount, int columnDataCount, int valueDataCount)
{
    int rowDataStart = 0;
    int columnDataStart = rowDataStart + rowDataCount;
    int valueDataStart = columnDataStart + columnDataCount;

    var columns = data
        .Select(r => new PivotValues(r, columnDataStart, columnDataCount))
        .Distinct()
        .OrderBy(c => c) // Optional
        .ToList();

    var emptyValues = new PivotValues(new string[valueDataCount]); // For missing (row, column) intersection

    var rows = data
        .GroupBy(r => new PivotValues(r, rowDataStart, rowDataCount))
        .Select(rg => new PivotDataRow
        {
            Data = rg.Key,
            Values = columns.GroupJoin(rg,
                c => c,
                r => new PivotValues(r, columnDataStart, columnDataCount),
                (c, vg) => vg.Any() ? new PivotValues(vg.First(), valueDataStart, valueDataCount) : emptyValues
            ).ToList()
        })
        .OrderBy(r => r.Data) // Optional
        .ToList();

    return new PivotData { Columns = columns, Rows = rows };
}

First the columns (headers) are determined with simple LINQ Distinct operator. Then the rows are determined by grouping the source set by the row columns. The values inside each row grouping are determined by outer joining the Columns with the grouping content.

Due to our data structure implementation, the LINQ transformation is quite efficient (for both space and time). The column and row ordering is optional, simple remove it if you don't need it.

Sample test with your dummy data:

var pivotData = data.ToPivot(2, 2, 1);
var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(pivotData);
var pivotData2 = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<PivotData>(json);
  • Thank you for such amazing answer. Can you please add some more explanation about what is PivotValues class is doing and how its been used. You also mentioned The column and row ordering is optional, simple remove it if you don't need it., what do you mean by it? – OpenStack May 23 '17 at 18:59
  • (2) I meant that I've included two OrderBy operators. If you remove them, the row / columns will be ordered by the first occurrence of the key value inside the input sequence (1) The PivotValues is a wrapper around List<string> representing a range inside that list (start at offset with count elements) - pretty similar to ArraySegment<T> in that regard. But what makes it really useful for direct using as key in LINQ operators is the implementation of GetHashCode and Equals (and CompareTo for sorting). – Ivan Stoev May 23 '17 at 19:34
  • The pivoting in general is no more than groping by row keys, grouping by column keys and correlating (finding the intersections) of the two sets :) In the general case with numeric values the intersection values are formed with applying some aggregate function like Sum, Average, Count, Min, Max` etc., but since you data consists of strings, I'm using simple First, which should work as far as the combinations of row (static) and column (dynamic) keys are unique in the input data. – Ivan Stoev May 23 '17 at 19:41
  • The value columns will always have numeric value but in order to store them with ease I used List<List<string>>. is it possible when result comes, we show them as number. In the result the values are shown as "Values": [["0"], ["0"], ["233101"], ["579984.59"],[]......] it is array inside another array. Can we just keep them as simple array? – OpenStack May 23 '17 at 20:04
  • Well, I've made it this way because of (5) and (6) of your post requirements - to allow unlimited number of value columns. Just in the sample the value columns count is 1. – Ivan Stoev May 23 '17 at 23:36
3

Here's the LINQ way to do this:

var working =
    data
        .Select(d => new
        {
            Region_L1 = d[0],
            Region_L2 = d[1],
            Product_L1 = d[2],
            Product_L2 = d[3],
            Value = double.Parse(d[4]),
        });

var output =
    working
        .GroupBy(x => new { x.Region_L1, x.Region_L2 }, x => new { x.Product_L1, x.Product_L2, x.Value })
        .Select(x => new { x.Key, Lookup = x.ToLookup(y => new { y.Product_L1, y.Product_L2 }, y => y.Value) })
        .Select(x => new
        {
            x.Key.Region_L1,
            x.Key.Region_L2,
            P_One_One = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item One" }].Sum(),
            P_One_Two = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item Two" }].Sum(),
            P_One_Four = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item Four" }].Sum(),
            P_One_Six = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item Six" }].Sum(),
            P_One_Eight = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item Eight" }].Sum(),
            P_One_Eleven = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item Eleven" }].Sum(),
            P_Two_Five = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product Two", Product_L2 = "Item Five" }].Sum(),
            P_Two_Seven = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product Two", Product_L2 = "Item Seven" }].Sum(),
            P_Two_Nine = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product Two", Product_L2 = "Item Nine" }].Sum(),
            P_Three_Three = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product Three", Product_L2 = "Item Three" }].Sum(),
            P_Three_Ten = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product Three", Product_L2 = "Item Ten" }].Sum(),
        });

That gives:

output 1

Note that LINQ needs specific field names for the output columns.

If the number of columns isn't know, but you have a handy headerInfo List<List<string>> then you can do this:

var output =
    working
        .GroupBy(x => new { x.Region_L1, x.Region_L2 }, x => new { x.Product_L1, x.Product_L2, x.Value })
        .Select(x => new { x.Key, Lookup = x.ToLookup(y => new { y.Product_L1, y.Product_L2 }, y => y.Value) })
        .Select(x => new
        {
            x.Key.Region_L1,
            x.Key.Region_L2,
            Headers =
                headerInfo
                    .Select(y => new { Product_L1 = y[0], Product_L2 = y[1] })
                    .Select(y => new { y.Product_L1, y.Product_L2, Value = x.Lookup[y].Sum() })
                    .ToArray(),
        });

That gives:

output 2

  • Thank you for your reply. Can we make this generic. Please correct me if i am wrong but it seems the first solution works based on the input (it knows no or columns). I need a solution which can work with any input. And I am also not sure what are you trying to address with the second solution. Can you please also explain how things are working in first solution. Thanks again for taking time out and helping me here. – OpenStack May 21 '17 at 16:35
  • @OpenStack - The first solution must know the columns - LINQ requires this. The second solution doesn't know the columns, but calls the third column Headers and then has an array of the remaining columns - it's the only way that LINQ can output a variable number of columns. You would just iterate over Headers when you need to extract the columns. – Enigmativity May 22 '17 at 3:47
  • Is there any better way to form data object using some kind of iterator. The code needs to be dynamic and it should work with any given input. lines like Region_L1 = d[0], or ` P_One_One = x.Lookup[new { Product_L1 = "Product One", Product_L2 = "Item One" }]` will not work because it is working on assumption that it knows about input structure. – OpenStack May 22 '17 at 14:47
  • @OpenStack - The second method is the way to go then. It is using an iterator and it is dynamic. – Enigmativity May 22 '17 at 23:21
  • 1
    @OpenStack - I understand that those things are available to you, but I wanted to know how they are available to you? – Enigmativity May 27 '17 at 9:18
1

You can use NReco PivotData library to create pivot tables by any number of columns in the following way (don't forget to install "NReco.PivotData" nuget package):

// rows in dataset are represented as 'arrays'
// lets define 'field name' -> 'field index' mapping
var fieldToIndex = new Dictionary<string,int>() {
    {"Region L1", 0},
    {"Region L2", 1},
    {"Product L1", 2},
    {"Product L2", 3},
    {"Val", 4}
};

// create multidimensional dataset
var pvtData = new PivotData(
    // group by 4 dimensions
    new[]{"Region L1", "Region L2", "Product L1", "Product L2"},
    // value (use CompositeAggregatorFactory for multiple values)
    new SumAggregatorFactory("Val") );
pvtData.ProcessData(data, (row, field) => ((IList)row)[fieldToIndex[field]] );

// create pivot table data model by the grouped data
var pvtTbl = new PivotTable(
        // dimensions for rows
        new[] {"Region L1", "Region L2"},
        // dimensions for columns
        new[] {"Product L1", "Product L2"},
        pvtData);

// now you can iterate through 'pvtTbl.RowKeys' and 'pvtTbl.ColumnKeys'
// to get row\column header labels and use 'pvtTbl.GetValue()'
// or 'pvtTbl[]' to pivot table get values

// you can easily render pivot table to HTML (or Excel, CSV) with
// components from PivotData Toolkit (NReco.PivotData.Extensions assembly):
var htmlResult = new StringWriter();
var pvtHtmlWr = new PivotTableHtmlWriter(htmlResult);
pvtHtmlWr.Write(pvtTbl);
var pvtTblHtml = htmlResult.ToString();

By default pivot table rows/columns are ordered by headers (A-Z). You can change the order as you need.

PivotData OLAP library (PivotData, PivotTable classes) can be used for free in single-deployment projects. Advanced components (like PivotTableHtmlWriter) require commercial license key.

  • It seems like the actual transformation is done by Advanced components . PivotData just loads the data into table. Please correct me if I am wrong. – OpenStack May 17 '17 at 15:20
  • @OpenStack no, data grouping/aggregation is performed by PivotData class. You can iterate through rows/columns with PivotTable model. Both these classes are part of OLAP library (NReco.PivotData.dll). – Vitaliy Fedorchenko May 17 '17 at 15:25
  • Thank you for quick reply. But if I look at pvtTbl, it has the same structure as the raw data. Can you please add some code or give some hint how to get the data in right format which will generate expected output? – OpenStack May 17 '17 at 15:55
  • @OpenStack pvtTbl has rows / columns that are determined dynamically by your input data, and this is exactly what you want to do, isn't it?.. Take a look to this documentation page that illustrates how to iterate through PivotTable model if you don't want to use PivotTableHtmlWriter: nrecosite.com/pivotdata/create-pivot-table.aspx – Vitaliy Fedorchenko May 17 '17 at 16:34
0

A bit "simplified" version:

string[][] data = {
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product One"  , "Item One"   ,   "579984.59" },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product One"  , "Item Two"   ,   "314586.73" },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product One"  , "Item One"   ,    "62735.13" },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product Two"  , "Item Five"  , "12619234.69" },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product Two"  , "Item Five"  ,  "8953713.39" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product One"  , "Item Two"   ,   "124267.4"  },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product One"  , "Item Four"  ,   "482338.49" },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product One"  , "Item Four"  ,   "809185.13" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product One"  , "Item Four"  ,   "233101"    },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product One"  , "Item Two"   ,   "120561.65" },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product One"  , "Item Six"   ,  "1517359.37" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product One"  , "Item Six"   ,   "382590.45" },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product One"  , "Item Eight" ,   "661835.64" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product Three", "Item Three" ,        "0"    },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product One"  , "Item Eight" ,        "0"    },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product Two"  , "Item Five"  ,  "3478145.38" },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product One"  , "Item Six"   ,        "0"    },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product Two"  , "Item Seven" ,  "4247059.97" },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product Two"  , "Item Seven" ,  "2163718.01" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product Two"  , "Item Seven" ,  "2158782.48" },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product Two"  , "Item Nine"  ,    "72634.46" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product Two"  , "Item Nine"  ,   "127500"    },
    new [] { "Global", "North America", "Product One"  , "Item One"   ,   "110964.44" },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product Three", "Item Ten"   ,     "2064.99" },
    new [] { "Global", "Europe"       , "Product One"  , "Item Eleven",        "0"    },
    new [] { "Global", "Asia"         , "Product Two"  , "Item Nine"  ,     "1250"    }
};

string[][] headerInfo = {
    new [] { "Product One"  , "Item One"    },
    new [] { "Product One"  , "Item Two"    },
    new [] { "Product One"  , "Item Four"   },
    new [] { "Product One"  , "Item Six"    },
    new [] { "Product One"  , "Item Eight"  },
    new [] { "Product One"  , "Item Eleven" },
    new [] { "Product Two"  , "Item Five"   },
    new [] { "Product Two"  , "Item Seven"  },
    new [] { "Product Two"  , "Item Nine"   },
    new [] { "Product Three", "Item Three"  },
    new [] { "Product Three", "Item Ten"    }
};

int[] rowHeaders = { 0, 1 }, colHeaders = { 2, 3 }; int valHeader = 4;

var pivot = data.ToLookup(r => string.Join("|", rowHeaders.Select(i => r[i])))
  .Select(g => g.ToLookup(c => string.Join("|", colHeaders.Select(i => c[i])), c => c[valHeader]));

foreach (var r in pivot)
    Debug.Print(string.Join(", ", headerInfo.Select(h => "[" + r[string.Join("|", h)].FirstOrDefault() + "]")));

results in:

[579984.59], [124267.4], [233101], [382590.45], [0], [0], [3478145.38], [2158782.48], [127500], [0], []
[110964.44], [314586.73], [809185.13], [1517359.37], [661835.64], [], [8953713.39], [4247059.97], [72634.46], [], []
[62735.13], [120561.65], [482338.49], [0], [], [], [12619234.69], [2163718.01], [1250], [], [2064.99]

The above is far from the most efficient because of the many string concatenations, so it can be about 5 times faster with a custom comparer:

public class SequenceComparer : IEqualityComparer<IEnumerable<string>>
{
    public bool Equals(IEnumerable<string> first, IEnumerable<string> second)
    {
        return first.SequenceEqual(second);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(IEnumerable<string> value)
    {
        return value.Aggregate(0, (a, v) => a ^ v.GetHashCode());
    }
}

and then:

var comparer = new SequenceComparer();
var pivot = data.ToLookup(r => rowHeaders.Select(i => r[i]), comparer)
  .Select(g => g.ToLookup(c => colHeaders.Select(i => c[i]), c => c[valHeader], comparer));

foreach (var r in pivot)
  Debug.Print(string.Join(", ", headerInfo.Select(h => "[" + string.Join(",", r[h]) + "]")));
0

Since we can predetermine the size of the result, then we can define it as multidimensional array.

Let's go for a functional approach and treat the result as an accumulator, so we'll simply write a reducer (for the Linq Aggregate method).

It will be based on a dictionary to map the horizontal to vertical line transformation and another status dictionary to build its rows (of course the dictionaries need a standard comparer).

This assumes that you have a validated header_info, so - first of all - I had to fix the first entry that was a duplication of the last one.

Compared to the other ones, the following solution is quite efficient (it only takes 1 millisec on my laptop, more than 4 time faster than the accepted answer).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

namespace pivot
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var _staticColumnCount = 2; //Columns that should not be pivoted        
            var _dynamicColumnCount = 2; // Columns which needs to be pivoted to form header            
            var _valueColumnCount = 1; //Columns that represent Actual value        
            var valueColumnIndex = 4; //Assuming index starts with 0;

            List<List<string>> headerInfo = new List<List<string>>();
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product Three", "Item Three" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product Two", "Item Five" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product Two", "Item Seven" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product Two", "Item Nine" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product One", "Item One" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product One", "Item Two" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product One", "Item Four" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product One", "Item Six" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product One", "Item Eight" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product One", "Item Eleven" });
            headerInfo.Add(new List<string> { "Product Three", "Item Ten" });


            List<List<string>> data = new List<List<string>>();
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item One", "579984.59" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Two", "314586.73" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item One", "62735.13" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product Two", "Item Five", "12619234.69" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product Two", "Item Five", "8953713.39" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Two", "124267.4" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item Four", "482338.49" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Four", "809185.13" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Four", "233101" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item Two", "120561.65" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Six", "1517359.37" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Six", "382590.45" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item Eight", "661835.64" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product Three", "Item Three", "0" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Eight", "0" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product Two", "Item Five", "3478145.38" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product One", "Item Six", "0" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product Two", "Item Seven", "4247059.97" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product Two", "Item Seven", "2163718.01" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product Two", "Item Seven", "2158782.48" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product Two", "Item Nine", "72634.46" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product Two", "Item Nine", "127500" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "North America", "Product One", "Item One", "110964.44" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product Three", "Item Ten", "2064.99" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Europe", "Product One", "Item Eleven", "0" });
            data.Add(new List<string> { "Global", "Asia", "Product Two", "Item Nine", "1250" });

            Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopwatch.Start();    
            Reducer reducer = new Reducer();
            reducer.headerCount = headerInfo.Count;

            reducer.headerCount = headerInfo.Count;
            var resultCount = (int)Math.Ceiling((double)data.Count / (double)reducer.headerCount);

            ValueArray[,] results = new ValueArray[resultCount, _staticColumnCount + reducer.headerCount];

            reducer.headerDict = new Dictionary<IEnumerable<string>, int>(new MyComparer());
            reducer.skipCols = _staticColumnCount;
            reducer.headerKeys = _dynamicColumnCount;
            reducer.rowDict = new Dictionary<IEnumerable<string>, int>(new MyComparer());
            reducer.currentLine = 0;
            reducer.valueCount = _valueColumnCount;
            for (int i = 0; i < reducer.headerCount; i++)
            {
                reducer.headerDict.Add(headerInfo[i], i);
            }

            results = data.Aggregate(results, reducer.reduce);
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("millisecs: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            for (int i = 0; i < resultCount; i++)
            {
                var curr_header = new string[reducer.headerCount];
                IEnumerable<string> curr_key = null;
                for (int j = 0; j < reducer.headerCount; j++)
                {
                    curr_header[j] = "[" +
                        String.Join(",", (results[i, reducer.skipCols + j]?.values) ?? new string[0])
                        + "]";
                    curr_key = curr_key ?? (results[i, reducer.skipCols + j]?.row_keys);
                }
                Console.WriteLine(String.Join(",", curr_key)
                    + ": " + String.Join(",", curr_header)
                    );
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
            // if you want to compare it to the accepted answer
            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            var pivotData = data.ToPivot(2, 2, 1); // with all needed classes/methods
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("millisecs: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Console.ReadKey();
        }
        internal class ValueArray
        {
            internal IEnumerable<string> row_keys;
            internal string[] values;
        }

        internal class Reducer
        {
            internal int headerCount;
            internal int skipCols;
            internal int headerKeys;
            internal int valueCount;
            internal Dictionary<IEnumerable<string>, int> headerDict;
            internal Dictionary<IEnumerable<string>, int> rowDict;
            internal int currentLine;
            internal ValueArray[,] reduce(ValueArray[,] results, List<string> line)
            {
                var header_col = headerDict[line.Skip(skipCols).Take(headerKeys)];
                var row_keys = line.Take(skipCols);

                var curr_values = new string[valueCount];
                for (int i = 0; i < valueCount; i++)
                {
                    curr_values[i] = line[skipCols + headerKeys + i];
                }

                if (rowDict.ContainsKey(row_keys))
                {
                    results[rowDict[row_keys], skipCols + header_col] = new ValueArray();
                    results[rowDict[row_keys], skipCols + header_col].row_keys = row_keys;
                    results[rowDict[row_keys], skipCols + header_col].values = curr_values;
                }
                else
                {
                    rowDict.Add(row_keys, currentLine);
                    results[currentLine, skipCols + header_col] = new ValueArray();
                    results[currentLine, skipCols + header_col].row_keys = row_keys;
                    results[currentLine, skipCols + header_col].values = curr_values;
                    currentLine++;
                }
                return results;
            }
        }

        public class MyComparer : IEqualityComparer<IEnumerable<string>>
        {
            public bool Equals(IEnumerable<string> x, IEnumerable<string> y)
            {
                return x.SequenceEqual(y);
            }

            public int GetHashCode(IEnumerable<string> obj)
            {
                return obj.First().GetHashCode();
            }
        }

    }
}

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