8

I have the following async function:

async function readFile () {
  let content = await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.readFile('./file.txt', function (err, content) {
      if (err) {
        return reject(err)
      }
      resolve(content)
    })
  })

  console.log(content)
}

readFile()

This runs just fine. It outputs the file buffer to the console as expected. But now, if I try to instead return the value:

async function readFile () {
  let content = await new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.readFile('./file.txt', function (err, content) {
      if (err) {
        return reject(err)
      }
      resolve(content)
    })
  })

  return content
}

console.log(readFile())

I now get:

Promise { <pending> }

Why is this? Why can you use a value inside that function but when you return it out of the function it's now a Promise?

How do you actually make use of this in a normal workflow? For example, lets say I wanted to check if a file exists, then read in the file, then update some database with the content, the synchronous pseudo code would look something like this:

if (fileExists(path)) {
  buffer = readFile(path)
  updateDatabase(buffer)
}

That workflow consists of 3 individual async operations. How would you do something like this with async/await? Is the key that you have to have your entire script wrapped in an async function?

async function doSomething () {
  if (fileExists(path)) {
    buffer = readFile(path)
    updateDatabase(buffer)
  }
}

(Keep in mind that is just pseudo-code but hopefully its gets my point across).

6
  • 4
    async/await is just sugar for promises, so, any function tagged async will always return a promise May 16, 2017 at 23:04
  • 2
    async functions do not make your code synchronous (why would they be called async then...) "Is the key that you have to have your entire script wrapped in an async function?" That works. Or use promises as usual: if (fileExists(path)) { readFile(path).then(updateDataBase);}. May 16, 2017 at 23:06
  • 1
    your async function doSomething() can use buffer = await readFile(path) May 16, 2017 at 23:19
  • What is the point of async/await then? I could just return a Promise like usual if I have to use .then() after the function. May 17, 2017 at 16:01
  • @JakeWilson pretty code.
    – Kevin B
    May 17, 2017 at 17:48

2 Answers 2

8

All async functions return a promise as was mentioned in the comments. You could therefore re-write your readFile function like this:

function readFile() {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.readFile('./file.txt', function (err, content) {
      if (err) {
        return reject(err)
      }
      resolve(content)
    })
  })
}

You would then consume the return value of readFile via await:

console.log(await readFile()) // will log your actual file contents.

The usual workflow with this paradigm is to break your async operations into separate functions that each return a promise, and then run them all inside a broader async function, much like you suggest, but with awaits and some error handling like so:

async function doSomething () {
  try {  
    const fileCheck = await fileExists(path)

    if (fileCheck) {
      const buffer = await readFile(path)
      await updateDatabase(buffer)
      // Whatever else you want to do
    }
  } catch (err) {
    // handle any rejected Promises here.
  }
}
3
  • If the function returns the promise anyway, you could drop the async May 17, 2017 at 13:12
  • Hi Mark, thanks for the reply. I'm curious if anyone is expected to you async/await in a node module for example, does the entire module need to be wrapped in one big async wrapper function or something? I guess when I look at all examples of async/await in action I don't see a lot of real world examples yet. Just a lot of people are using someAsyncFunction instead of a legitimate library function in their examples. May 17, 2017 at 18:02
  • 1
    You wouldn't "wrap the library." You would just await the result of the library function. Here is an example with node-postgres. You need to confirm the library uses promises though, else you would have to wrap any callback based methods in a function that returns a promise. May 17, 2017 at 18:19
0
const serchContentXmlFile = async (path, content) => {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.readFile(path, function (err, data) {
      if (err) {
        return reject(err)
      }
      resolve(data.indexOf(content))
    })
  })
}

await serchContentXmlFile("category.xml",xmlUrl);
1
  • 1
    Please provide some explanation on your code.
    – gru
    Feb 22 at 10:36

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