189

I'd like to create a random string, consisting of alpha-numeric characters. I want to be able to be specify the length of the string.

How do I do this in C++?

18 Answers 18

300
+100

Mehrdad Afshari's answer would do the trick, but I found it a bit too verbose for this simple task. Look-up tables can sometimes do wonders:

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>
#include <unistd.h>

using namespace std;

string gen_random(const int len) {
    
    string tmp_s;
    static const char alphanum[] =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    
    srand( (unsigned) time(NULL) * getpid());

    tmp_s.reserve(len);

    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) 
        tmp_s += alphanum[rand() % (sizeof(alphanum) - 1)];
    
    
    return tmp_s;
    
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    
    cout << gen_random(12) << endl;
    
    return 0;
}
31
  • 7
    @Kent: that's what the OpenSSL team though, until someone thought of putting their code through valgrind. ;-) – Konrad Rudolph Jan 14 '09 at 20:58
  • 11
    You probably don't want to use a simple rand() with modulus. See: c-faq.com/lib/randrange.html – Randy Proctor May 15 '09 at 13:02
  • 5
    I think the line s[len] = 0 is incorrect. If s is a C string (NULL terminated) then the signature of the method would not have to have the lenparameter in it. Imo, if you are passing the length as an argument, you are assuming the array is not a C string. Thus, if you are not passing a C string to the function, the line s[len] = 0 could break things, since the array would go from 0 to len-1. And even if you are passing a C string to the function the line s[len] = 0 would be redundant. – Felipe Oct 22 '12 at 19:04
  • 20
    Please use C++11 or boost random, we're in 2016 now – Nikko Jan 29 '16 at 13:23
  • 17
    We need a way to sink obsolete answers on stackoverflow. – Velkan May 23 '17 at 6:20
113

Here's my adaptation of Ates Goral's answer using C++11. I've added the lambda in here, but the principle is that you could pass it in and thereby control what characters your string contains:

std::string random_string( size_t length )
{
    auto randchar = []() -> char
    {
        const char charset[] =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
        const size_t max_index = (sizeof(charset) - 1);
        return charset[ rand() % max_index ];
    };
    std::string str(length,0);
    std::generate_n( str.begin(), length, randchar );
    return str;
}

Here is an example of passing in a lambda to the random string function: http://ideone.com/Ya8EKf

Why would you use C++11?

  1. Because you can produce strings that follow a certain probability distribution (or distribution combination) for the character set you're interested in.
  2. Because it has built-in support for non-deterministic random numbers
  3. Because it supports unicode, so you could change this to an internationalized version.

For example:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <random>
#include <functional> //for std::function
#include <algorithm>  //for std::generate_n

typedef std::vector<char> char_array;

char_array charset()
{
    //Change this to suit
    return char_array( 
    {'0','1','2','3','4',
    '5','6','7','8','9',
    'A','B','C','D','E','F',
    'G','H','I','J','K',
    'L','M','N','O','P',
    'Q','R','S','T','U',
    'V','W','X','Y','Z',
    'a','b','c','d','e','f',
    'g','h','i','j','k',
    'l','m','n','o','p',
    'q','r','s','t','u',
    'v','w','x','y','z'
    });
};    

// given a function that generates a random character,
// return a string of the requested length
std::string random_string( size_t length, std::function<char(void)> rand_char )
{
    std::string str(length,0);
    std::generate_n( str.begin(), length, rand_char );
    return str;
}

int main()
{
    //0) create the character set.
    //   yes, you can use an array here, 
    //   but a function is cleaner and more flexible
    const auto ch_set = charset();

    //1) create a non-deterministic random number generator      
    std::default_random_engine rng(std::random_device{}());

    //2) create a random number "shaper" that will give
    //   us uniformly distributed indices into the character set
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dist(0, ch_set.size()-1);

    //3) create a function that ties them together, to get:
    //   a non-deterministic uniform distribution from the 
    //   character set of your choice.
    auto randchar = [ ch_set,&dist,&rng ](){return ch_set[ dist(rng) ];};

    //4) set the length of the string you want and profit!        
    auto length = 5;
    std::cout<<random_string(length,randchar)<<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Sample output.

7
  • Note that on at least MSVC 2012, you will need to const auto randSeed = std::random_device(), then pass randSeed to std::default_random_engine(). std::random_device{}() cannot compile with this version. – NuSkooler Apr 22 '15 at 22:33
  • 9
    If you're using C++11, isn't it better to not use rand() in your first code snippet? – Ehtesh Choudhury Aug 27 '15 at 7:24
  • C++11 allows you to separate the generator from the engine, but what is best depends on what the needs of your application are. This is why my first snippet uses rand and the second does not. – Carl Aug 31 '15 at 18:31
  • 8
    I would argue it's never correct to use rand() anymore. It's not even uniform for crying out loud... – jeremyong Oct 20 '16 at 22:50
  • 1
    @Carl I think in the C++ community, rand is deprecated and a well-known anti-pattern for many reasons aside from non-uniformity (see STL's talk "Rand Considered Harmful"). The abstraction of the generator from the view is a general C++ concept that I think is important to practitioners and students of C++ to learn (consider how it carries over to std::chrono, std::string_view, etc). – jeremyong Jul 27 '17 at 6:07
45

My 2p solution:

#include <random>
#include <string>

std::string random_string(std::string::size_type length)
{
    static auto& chrs = "0123456789"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

    thread_local static std::mt19937 rg{std::random_device{}()};
    thread_local static std::uniform_int_distribution<std::string::size_type> pick(0, sizeof(chrs) - 2);

    std::string s;

    s.reserve(length);

    while(length--)
        s += chrs[pick(rg)];

    return s;
}
8
  • 2
    @Velkan To be honest std::default_random_engine isn't something I feel good about recommending as the standard makes no guarantees about its quality, efficiency or repeatability between implementations. – Galik May 23 '17 at 9:54
  • 1
    To avoid using a char array literal and thus having to use sizeof, change the auto& to std::string, which gives you std::string::length – smac89 Jan 1 '18 at 1:19
  • 1
    @Chronial Yes indeed, that would be better. However std::size did not appear until C++17 and there are still a lot of people only coding to C++11/14 so I will leave it as it is for now. – Galik Apr 20 '20 at 11:49
  • 1
    Shouldn't sizeof(chrs) - 2 be sizeof(chrs) - 1, because uniform_int_distribution includes the final value (it's an inclusive limit)? – Richard Whitehead Nov 11 '20 at 9:53
  • 2
    @RichardWhitehead No, because the array of characters chars includes the null terminator - adding 1 to its length. That means there are sizeof(chrs) - 1 valid characters and the array index starts at 0 so the inclusive range would be [0, sizeof(chrs) - 2] because sizeof(chrs) - 2 is the index of the last valid character. – Galik Nov 11 '20 at 12:38
15
 void gen_random(char *s, size_t len) {
     for (size_t i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
         int randomChar = rand()%(26+26+10);
         if (randomChar < 26)
             s[i] = 'a' + randomChar;
         else if (randomChar < 26+26)
             s[i] = 'A' + randomChar - 26;
         else
             s[i] = '0' + randomChar - 26 - 26;
     }
     s[len] = 0;
 }
6
  • Nice: this is independent of character set (at least for all character sets that have a..z,A..Z, and 0..9 continguous). – dmckee --- ex-moderator kitten Jan 13 '09 at 18:39
  • 2
    @dmckee: true, but what other character sets are those? (EBCDIC doesn't have contiguous letters). – Greg Hewgill Jan 13 '09 at 18:44
  • 1
    Um. I guess I'm caught out. I was just parroting something a professor said to me once... – dmckee --- ex-moderator kitten Jan 13 '09 at 18:49
  • A quick check of the standard shows no such continuity requirements in section 2.2, where I'd expect them. – David Thornley Jan 13 '09 at 20:50
  • 2
    0..9 are required to be contiguous, though. no section number, but i'm sure about this. – Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 14 '09 at 4:43
12

Rather than manually looping, prefer using the appropriate C++ algorithm, in this case std::generate_n, with a proper random number generator:

auto generate_random_alphanumeric_string(std::size_t len) -> std::string {
    static constexpr auto chars =
        "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    thread_local auto rng = random_generator<>();
    auto dist = std::uniform_int_distribution{{}, std::strlen(chars) - 1};
    auto result = std::string(len, '\0');
    std::generate_n(begin(result), len, [&]() { return chars[dist(rng)]; });
    return result;
}

This is close to something I would call the “canonical” solution for this problem.

Unfortunately, correctly seeding a generic C++ random number generator (e.g. MT19937) is really hard. The above code therefore uses a helper function template, random_generator:

template <typename T = std::mt19937>
auto random_generator() -> T {
    auto constexpr seed_bytes = sizeof(typename T::result_type) * T::state_size;
    auto constexpr seed_len = seed_bytes / sizeof(std::seed_seq::result_type);
    auto seed = std::array<std::seed_seq::result_type, seed_len>();
    auto dev = std::random_device();
    std::generate_n(begin(seed), seed_len, std::ref(dev));
    auto seed_seq = std::seed_seq(begin(seed), end(seed));
    return T{seed_seq};
}

This is complex and relatively inefficient. Luckily it’s used to initialise a thread_local variable and is therefore only invoked once per thread.

Finally, the necessary includes for the above are:

#include <algorithm>
#include <array>
#include <cstring>
#include <functional>
#include <random>
#include <string>

The above code uses class template argument deduction and thus requires C++17. It can be trivially adapted for earlier versions by adding the required template arguments.

12
  • is it just deducing std::size_t for std::uniform_int_distribution? I can't see any other CTAD – Caleth Mar 17 '20 at 12:02
  • @Caleth Correct. (Why) does this surprise you? – Konrad Rudolph Mar 17 '20 at 12:02
  • I'm tempted to suggest taking rng as a defaulted parameter, with something like template <typename T = std::mt19937> inline thread_local T default_rng = get_random_generator<T>(); – Caleth Mar 17 '20 at 12:05
  • It took me a second to see it at all. I was probably mentally substituting std::uniform_int_distribution<>, which would be safe, but might warn about signed -> unsigned conversion. – Caleth Mar 17 '20 at 12:09
  • 1
    @user1032677 The point is that std::random_device is only a PRNG on platforms that don’t offer better sources of entropy, so you literally can’t do any better. I agree that it would be better if std::random_device weren’t implemented on platforms that lack a good source of entropy but I don’t see how that relates specifically to my answer. – Konrad Rudolph Aug 2 '20 at 15:25
9

I just tested this, it works sweet and doesn't require a lookup table. rand_alnum() sort of forces out alphanumerics but because it selects 62 out of a possible 256 chars it isn't a big deal.

#include <cstdlib>   // for rand()
#include <cctype>    // for isalnum()   
#include <algorithm> // for back_inserter
#include <string>

char 
rand_alnum()
{
    char c;
    while (!std::isalnum(c = static_cast<char>(std::rand())))
        ;
    return c;
}


std::string 
rand_alnum_str (std::string::size_type sz)
{
    std::string s;
    s.reserve  (sz);
    generate_n (std::back_inserter(s), sz, rand_alnum);
    return s;
}
1
  • 9
    There is no way to know how long this function will take to run. It's very unlikely, but strictly speaking, this could run indefinitely. – ctrlc-root Aug 14 '12 at 18:03
7

I hope this helps someone.

Tested at https://www.codechef.com/ide with C++ 4.9.2

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stdlib.h>     /* srand, rand */

using namespace std;

string RandomString(int len)
{
   string str = "0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
   string newstr;
   int pos;
   while(newstr.size() != len) {
    pos = ((rand() % (str.size() - 1)));
    newstr += str.substr(pos,1);
   }
   return newstr;
}

int main()
{
   srand(time(0));
   string random_str = RandomString(100);
   cout << "random_str : " << random_str << endl;
}

Output: random_str : DNAT1LAmbJYO0GvVo4LGqYpNcyK3eZ6t0IN3dYpHtRfwheSYipoZOf04gK7OwFIwXg2BHsSBMB84rceaTTCtBC0uZ8JWPdVxKXBd

2
  • 3
    Plus 1, Minus 1: Reader, beware: RandomString(100)! ;-) – azhrei Jul 24 '15 at 0:25
  • 2
    This code is still broken and has several problems. Most importantly std::srand() should only really be called once at the beginning of the program (preferably the first thing in main()). The code, as is, will generate a lot of identical "random" strings if called in a tight loop. – Galik Sep 16 '18 at 5:18
4

Here's a funny one-liner. Needs ASCII.

void gen_random(char *s, int l) {
    for (int c; c=rand()%62, *s++ = (c+"07="[(c+16)/26])*(l-->0););
}
3
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <random>

std::string generateRandomId(size_t length = 0)
{
    static const std::string allowed_chars {"123456789BCDFGHJKLMNPQRSTVWXZbcdfghjklmnpqrstvwxz"};

    static thread_local std::default_random_engine randomEngine(std::random_device{}());
    static thread_local std::uniform_int_distribution<int> randomDistribution(0, allowed_chars.size() - 1);

    std::string id(length ? length : 32, '\0');

    for (std::string::value_type& c : id) {
        c = allowed_chars[randomDistribution(randomEngine)];
    }

    return id;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << generateRandomId() << std::endl;
}
5
1

Something even simpler and more basic in case you're happy for your string to contain any printable characters:

#include <time.h>   // we'll use time for the seed
#include <string.h> // this is for strcpy

void randomString(int size, char* output) // pass the destination size and the destination itself
{
    srand(time(NULL)); // seed with time

    char src[size];
    size = rand() % size; // this randomises the size (optional)

    src[size] = '\0'; // start with the end of the string...

    // ...and work your way backwards
    while(--size > -1)
        src[size] = (rand() % 94) + 32; // generate a string ranging from the space character to ~ (tilde)

    strcpy(output, src); // store the random string
}
1
  • 1
    I suppose this is the simplest solution and absolutely suitable for the case with specified character set – VolAnd Jul 21 '17 at 19:07
1

Random string, every run file = different string

        auto randchar = []() -> char
    {
        const char charset[] =
            "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"
            "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

        const size_t max_index = (sizeof(charset) - 1);

        return charset[randomGenerator(0, max_index)];
    };
            std::string custom_string;
            size_t LENGTH_NAME = 6 // length of name
    generate_n(custom_string.begin(), LENGTH_NAME, randchar);
1
  • This is undefined behavior, because std::generate_n will assume the custom_string has length LENGTH_NAME, but it does not. – Cornstalks Feb 1 '16 at 14:57
1

Example for Qt use:)

QString random_string(int length=32, QString allow_symbols=QString("abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789")) {
    QString result;
    qsrand(QTime::currentTime().msec());
    for (int i = 0; i < length; ++i) {            
        result.append(allow_symbols.at(qrand() % (allow_symbols.length())));
    }
    return result;
}
1
  • Can you elaborate on your answer? Posting only a piece of code is often not very helpful. – Noel Widmer Sep 8 '17 at 6:36
1

Let's make random convenient again!

I made up a nice C++11 header only solution. You could easily add one header file to your project and then add your tests or use random strings for another purposes.

That's a quick description, but you can follow the link to check full code. The main part of solution is in class Randomer:

class Randomer {
    // random seed by default
    std::mt19937 gen_;
    std::uniform_int_distribution<size_t> dist_;

public:
    /* ... some convenience ctors ... */

    Randomer(size_t min, size_t max, unsigned int seed = std::random_device{}())
        : gen_{seed}, dist_{min, max} {
    }

    // if you want predictable numbers
    void SetSeed(unsigned int seed) {
        gen_.seed(seed);
    }

    size_t operator()() {
        return dist_(gen_);
    }
};

Randomer incapsulates all random stuff and you can add your own functionality to it easily. After we have Randomer, it's very easy to generate strings:

std::string GenerateString(size_t len) {
    std::string str;
    auto rand_char = [](){ return alphabet[randomer()]; };
    std::generate_n(std::back_inserter(str), len, rand_char);
    return str;
}

Write your suggestions for improvement below. https://gist.github.com/VjGusev/e6da2cb4d4b0b531c1d009cd1f8904ad

0

Yet another adaptation because non of the answers would suffice my needs. First of all if rand() is used to generate random numbers you will get the same output at each run. The seed for random number generator has to be some sort of random. With C++11 you can include "random" library and you can initialize the seed with random_device and mt19937. This seed will be supplied by the OS and it will be random enough for us(for ex: clock). You can give a range boundaries are included [0,25] in my case. And last but not least I only needed random string of lowercase letters so I utilized char addition. With a pool of characters approach did not work out for me.

#include <random>    
void gen_random(char *s, const int len){
    static std::random_device rd;
    static std::mt19937 mt(rd());
    static std::uniform_int_distribution<int> dist(0, 25);
    for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
        s[i] = 'a' + dist(mt);
    }
    s[len] = 0;
}
0
//C++ Simple Code
#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
int main() {
vector<char> alphanum =
    {'0','1','2','3','4',
'5','6','7','8','9',
'A','B','C','D','E','F',
'G','H','I','J','K',
'L','M','N','O','P',
'Q','R','S','T','U',
'V','W','X','Y','Z',
'a','b','c','d','e','f',
'g','h','i','j','k',
'l','m','n','o','p',
'q','r','s','t','u',
'v','w','x','y','z'
};
string s="";
int len=5;
srand(time(0)); 
for (int i = 0; i <len; i++) {
    int t=alphanum.size()-1;
    int idx=rand()%t;
    s+= alphanum[idx];
}
cout<<s<<" ";
return 0;
}
1
-1

Be ware when calling the function

string gen_random(const int len) {
static const char alphanum[] = "0123456789"
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

stringstream ss;

for (int i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
    ss << alphanum[rand() % (sizeof(alphanum) - 1)];
}
return ss.str();
}

(adapted of @Ates Goral) it will result in the same character sequence every time. Use

srand(time(NULL));

before calling the function, although the rand() function is always seeded with 1 @kjfletch.

For Example:

void SerialNumberGenerator() {

    srand(time(NULL));
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        cout << gen_random(10) << endl;
    }
}
-1
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
    int size;
    std::cout << "Enter size : ";
    std::cin >> size;
    std::string str;
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        auto d = rand() % 26 + 'a';
        str.push_back(d);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        std::cout << str[i] << '\t';
    }

    return 0;
}
-2
void strGetRandomAlphaNum(char *sStr, unsigned int iLen)
{
  char Syms[] = "0123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
  unsigned int Ind = 0;
  srand(time(NULL) + rand());
  while(Ind < iLen)
  {
    sStr[Ind++] = Syms[rand()%62];
  }
  sStr[iLen] = '\0';
}
5
  • Looks just about the same as the top ranked answer. Not sure this answer adds any value. – jm. Jan 30 '15 at 17:22
  • Yes it does " srand(time(NULL)); " The index will be random in every iteration, making your string more random xD The string will be different every time he runs the function ... Also the characters in the Syms represent a single array, not array of pointers to strings. – Деян Добромиров Feb 2 '15 at 13:45
  • 1
    Have you tried it? srand(time(NULL)) resets the random generator to same all the cycle and so it will basically print row of same symbol. – Öö Tiib Feb 2 '15 at 14:10
  • Good job there, fixed :) – Деян Добромиров Feb 3 '15 at 7:32
  • It runs on my STM32F4 xD – Деян Добромиров Feb 4 '15 at 7:40

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