44

Say I have an Oracle PL/SQL block that inserts a record into a table and need to recover from a unique constraint error, like this:

begin
    insert into some_table ('some', 'values');
exception
    when ...
        update some_table set value = 'values' where key = 'some';
end;

Is it possible to replace the ellipsis for something in order to catch an unique constraint error?

3
  • To use exceptions this way is a bit slow because raising exceptions takes quite a lot of time. Try merge.
    – tuinstoel
    Jan 13, 2009 at 20:33
  • 1
    Agreed. But keep in mind that this example was just one of many possible use cases. The question really is "what is the id for unique constraint error?". That's why I voted William's answer up but accepted Ricardo's. Jan 14, 2009 at 11:34
  • 2
    Exceptions in PL/SQL code are not as expensive as in managed or high level languages (C#, Java). In a DB application the real "slowness" is caused by db access, a PL/SQL exception cost is insignificant in this context Jan 16, 2009 at 16:25

4 Answers 4

86
EXCEPTION
      WHEN DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX
      THEN
         UPDATE
1
  • 2
    how can you write out the value that is causing the issue?
    – Sonic Soul
    Mar 21, 2014 at 16:16
28

I'm sure you have your reasons, but just in case... you should also consider using a "merge" query instead:

begin
    merge into some_table st
    using (select 'some' name, 'values' value from dual) v
    on (st.name=v.name)
    when matched then update set st.value=v.value
    when not matched then insert (name, value) values (v.name, v.value);
end;

(modified the above to be in the begin/end block; obviously you can run it independantly of the procedure too).

3
  • 1
    This helps with this specific use case, but it was an example only. The question is really about the id for an unique constraint error, so I'm upvoting this answer because it is indeed helpful, but Ricardo's will be the accepted one. Jan 14, 2009 at 11:36
  • 1
    Ricardo's answer was the correct named exception, but I think William's suggestion will help more people in the long run.
    – Stew S
    Jan 16, 2009 at 12:41
  • Executing merge in parallel DB sessions can also lead to unique constraint violation in one session
    – Sergey94
    Jun 18, 2020 at 6:42
15

I suspect the condition you are looking for is DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX

EXCEPTION
    WHEN DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX THEN
        DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('OH DEAR. I THINK IT IS TIME TO PANIC!')
4
  • how can you write out the value that is causing the issue?
    – Sonic Soul
    Mar 21, 2014 at 16:18
  • when the exception is caught, run a new query that just selects out the duplicates and reports them.
    – EvilTeach
    Mar 21, 2014 at 19:51
  • you can do that before running the query?
    – Sonic Soul
    Mar 21, 2014 at 21:45
  • I was misdirecting you. You are inserting lots of rows. You can only select them after they are inserted. If the record doesn't get inserted, there is nothing to select.
    – EvilTeach
    Mar 21, 2014 at 23:49
0

As an alternative to explicitly catching and handling the exception you could tell Oracle to catch and automatically ignore the exception by including a /*+ hint */ in the insert statement. This is a little faster than explicitly catching the exception and then articulating how it should be handled. It is also easier to setup. The downside is that you do not get any feedback from Oracle that an exception was caught.

Here is an example where we would be selecting from another table, or perhaps an inner query, and inserting the results into a table called TABLE_NAME which has a unique constraint on a column called IDX_COL_NAME.

INSERT /*+ ignore_row_on_dupkey_index(TABLE_NAME(IDX_COL_NAME)) */ 
INTO TABLE_NAME(
    INDEX_COL_NAME
  , col_1
  , col_2
  , col_3
  , ...
  , col_n)
SELECT 
    INDEX_COL_NAME
  , col_1
  , col_2
  , col_3
  , ...
  , col_n);

This is not a great solution if your goal it to catch and handle (i.e. print out or update the row that is violating the constraint). But if you just wanted to catch it and ignore the violating row then then this should do the job.

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