5

I need to split the list into two lists by predicate with limiting elements that are going to true part.
E.g. Let's say I have such list : A = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] and I want to split it by predicate o -> o % 2 == 0 and with limit 3.
I want to get Map<Boolean, List<Integer>> where:

true -> [2, 4, 6] // objects by predicate and with limit (actually, order is not important)
false -> [1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10]  // All other objects

Java 8 has collector that splits stream by predicate - Collectors.partitioningBy(...), but it doesn't support limits. Is it possible to do this with java 8 streams / guava / apache, or should I create my own implementation of this function?

EDIT: I wrote this function. If you have any suggestion about this, feel free to tell me. MultiValuedMap is optional and can be replaced with Map.

private <E> MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> partitioningByWithLimit(Predicate<E> predicate, List<E> src, int limit) {
    MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> result = new ArrayListValuedHashMap<>();
    Iterator<E> iterator = src.iterator();
    while (iterator.hasNext()) {
        E next = iterator.next();
        if (limit > 0 && predicate.test(next)) {
            result.put(true, next);
            iterator.remove();
            limit--;
        }
    }
    result.putAll(false, src);
    return result;
}
  • Can you integrate a counter into your predicate so that it looks something like o -> (o % 2 == 0)&&((counter++)<3)? That would result the 4th and following executions to return false. Create a wrapper object for the counter in order to avoid the needs to be effectively final issue. – f1sh May 17 '17 at 12:39
  • 2
    You can always replace o -> o%2==0 && counter++<3 with a more verbose construct, if you like. The actual problem is that this is a stateful predicate, which won’t work in all contexts. And this doesn’t depend on the chosen syntax. – Holger May 17 '17 at 13:01
  • 1
    Your code relies on the permission to modify the source List, without any need. It should be easy to add an else result.put(false, next); to the if instead, shouldn’t it? Then, you can use a for-each loop instead of dealing with an Iterator manually. – Holger May 17 '17 at 13:11
  • 2
    @Eugene: if you are going into that direction, you could use List<Integer> matches=new ArrayList<>(3); source.removeIf(i -> matches.size()<3 && i%2==0 && matches.add(i)); – Holger May 17 '17 at 13:19
  • 2
    @Holger oh yes! third time this week I keep forgetting about removeIf. – Eugene May 17 '17 at 13:26
4

There is no clean Stream solution, as the task relies on a stateful predicate.

So your loop is not bad, but it can be cleanup up a bit:

private <E> MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> partitioningByWithLimit(
                                       Predicate<E> predicate, List<E> src, int limit) {
    MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> result = new ArrayListValuedHashMap<>();
    for(E next: src) {
        boolean key = limit>0 && predicate.test(next);
        result.put(key, next);
        if(key) limit--;
    }
    return result;
}

If you really want to get the feeling of being a little faster when the limit has been reached, you may use

private <E> MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> partitioningByWithLimit(
                                       Predicate<E> predicate, List<E> src, int limit) {
    MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> result = new ArrayListValuedHashMap<>();
    for(Iterator<E> iterator = src.iterator(); iterator.hasNext(); ) {
        E next = iterator.next();
        boolean key = predicate.test(next);
        result.put(key, next);
        if(key && --limit==0) iterator.forEachRemaining(result.get(false)::add);
    }
    return result;
}

This avoids rechecking the limit and even the map lookup for the remaining elements, however, I wouldn’t expect a big performance difference. The first variant is much simpler.

Another alternative, utilizing more Java 8 features, is

private <E> MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> partitioningByWithLimit(
                                       Predicate<E> predicate, List<E> src, int limit) {
    MultiValuedMap<Boolean, E> result = new ArrayListValuedHashMap<>();
    result.putAll(false, src);
    List<E> pos = result.get(true);
    result.get(false).removeIf(e -> pos.size()<limit && predicate.test(e) && pos.add(e));
    return result;
}
6

Here is a way to do it based on a custom collector:

public static <E> Collector<E, ?, Map<Boolean, List<E>>> partitioningByWithLimit(
        Predicate<E> predicate,
        int limit) {

    class Acc {
        Map<Boolean, List<E>> map = new HashMap<>();

        Acc() {
            map.put(true, new ArrayList<>());
            map.put(false, new ArrayList<>());
        }

        void add(E elem) {
            int size = map.get(true).size();
            boolean key = size < limit && predicate.test(elem);
            map.get(key).add(elem);
        }

        Acc combine(Acc another) {
            another.map.get(true).forEach(this::add);
            another.map.get(false).forEach(this::add);
            return this;
        }
    }

    return Collector.of(Acc::new, Acc::add, Acc::combine, acc -> acc.map));
}

I'm using a local Acc class that wraps the map and exposes the logic to accumulate and combine elements of the stream into a map. This map is partitioned according to the predicate and limit provided.

At the end, I'm collecting the stream with Collector.of.

Usage:

List<Integer> list = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10);

Map<Boolean, List<Integer>> map = list.stream()
        .collect(partitioningByWithLimit(n -> n % 2 == 0, 3));

Output is:

{false=[1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10], true=[2, 4, 6]}

The main advantage of this approach is that it also supports parallel streams.

  • 2
    This does not maintain the encounter order in the combiner. In fact, it’s impossible to reconstitute the order at this point, as it has been already lost. – Holger May 17 '17 at 16:26
  • 1
    @Holger OP specifically said that order was not important – Federico Peralta Schaffner May 17 '17 at 16:31
  • Is Parallel supported or not really import for this kind of question? Prior java 8, a lot of traditional codes can NOT run in parallel, and it's not necessary. parallel programming is becoming easier by stream API, Doesn't it mean we always should/need to think about parallel when it's written in java 8 Stream API? or just need to think about it only when parallel stream is required? – user_3380739 May 18 '17 at 18:20
  • @DeveloperofAbacusUtil That's debatable. When you implement something with the Stream API, you don't have to necessarily support parallel operations. In this case, you should clarify this fact to the users of your code. You might even choose to throw an exception if the stream is parallel, or just not take advantage of the parallel nature of the stream. I used a collector in my answer mainly for 2 reasons: 1) OP had mentioned Collectors.partitioningBy in his question, and 2) Holger covered all other possible solutions in his answer ;) – Federico Peralta Schaffner May 18 '17 at 18:31
  • @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner en??? I have a different opinion. Most likely, you assume all the codes will be written in parallel soon or later. My point is the code written in more than 90% methods run sequentially, and most of them can't run in parallel, regardless Java 8 Stream API is used or not. So why not forget the parallel stream and write the simple code as possible. adopt parallel stream only when it jump out. (remember it: possibly there is less 1% chance) – user_3380739 May 18 '17 at 18:53
1

What about this:

List<Integer> lista = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10);
List<Integer> count = new ArrayList<>(); 
Map<Boolean, List<Integer>> collect = lista.stream().collect(Collectors.groupingBy(new Function<Integer, Boolean>() {

    private int count = 0;

    @Override
    public Boolean apply(Integer o) {
        if(o % 2 == 0 && count < 3){
            count++;
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
}));
System.out.println(collect);

Prints: {false=[1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10], true=[2, 4, 6]}

  • @Eugene, check the question, that is what the asker wants.. – BrunoDM May 17 '17 at 13:05
  • 2
    The main risk being that it's thread unsafe, if anyone ever makes this parallel you're in trouble. – Tim B May 17 '17 at 14:55
1

How about:

list.stream().collect(Collectors.partitioningBy(withLimit(i -> i % 2 == 0, 3)));

public static <E> Predicate<E> withLimit(final Predicate<E> predicate, final int limit) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(predicate);
    final AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(limit);
    return e -> predicate.test(e) && counter.decrementAndGet() > 0;
}

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