13

What is the best way to filter an object this way in ES6?

Starting data:

const acceptedValues = ["value1","value3"]
const myObject = {
    prop1:"value1",
    prop2:"value2",
    prop3:"value3"
}

Expected output:

filteredObject = {
    prop1:"value1",
    prop3:"value3"
}
  • 2
    Best way in terms of what? A simple loop over the object's properties would do. – Felix Kling May 17 '17 at 13:19
  • If possible, try to capture accepted keys instead of values to make this easy. – hazardous May 17 '17 at 13:27
  • In term of efficiency mostly. A simple loop would do the trick indeed, But ES6 and "modern" array methods could make it easier. The answer with .reduce() is a nice example of that imo. – saawsann May 17 '17 at 13:34
  • Best way? Don't use an Object (but an Array) from the beginning. – user6445533 May 17 '17 at 13:36
15

You can use reduce() to create new object and includes() to check if value of object exists in array.

const acceptedValues = ["value1", "value3"]
const myObject = {
  prop1: "value1",
  prop2: "value2",
  prop3: "value3"
}

var filteredObject = Object.keys(myObject).reduce(function(r, e) {
  if (acceptedValues.includes(myObject[e])) r[e] = myObject[e]
  return r;
}, {})

console.log(filteredObject)

| improve this answer | |
  • Could you please explain why using .filter doesn't work in this case when I have an object? this.activeUsers = window.users.filter( function(user) {// return ( (user.test === '0') && (user.isok === '0') ); return user.user_id === 1; }); getting the error .filter is not a function – W.Doch Apr 1 '19 at 15:07
4

For ES6 and if you need static code (you know exactly, what properties you need to filter) and it does not depends on the app state, than you can use the following destructuring technique:

const myObject = {
  prop1: 'value1',
  prop2: 'value2',
  prop3: 'value3'
}
const { prop2, ...filteredObject } = myObject

console.info({ filteredObject, prop2 })

And you will have:

filteredObject: {prop1: "value1", prop3: "value3"}
prop2: "value2"
| improve this answer | |
3

Just to build on top of @Nenad Vracar good answer you could use an object instead of the Array with includes for faster lookup:

const acceptedValues = ["value1", "value3"];
const myObject = {
  prop1: "value1",
  prop2: "value2",
  prop3: "value3"
};

const lookup = acceptedValues.reduce( (memo, prop) => {
  memo[prop] = true;
  return memo;
});

const filteredObject = Object.keys(myObject).reduce((filtered, key) => {
  if(lookup[myObject[key]]){
    filtered[key] = myObject[key];
  }
  return filtered;
}, {});

console.log(filteredObject);

Nor that the includes doesn't do the job, but I thought to provide an alternative view.

| improve this answer | |
2

Why not a simple for loop?

const acceptedValues = ["value1","value3"]
const myObject = {
    prop1:"value1",
    prop2:"value2",
    prop3:"value3"
};
var  filteredObject = {};
for(e in myObject) {
    if (myObject.hasOwnProperty(e)) {
      if (acceptedValues.indexOf(myObject[e]) != -1) {
          filteredObject[e] = myObject[e];
      }
    }
}
console.log(filteredObject);

| improve this answer | |
1

IMO, the "best way" is the Lodash way

const filtered = _.pick(myObject, acceptedValues)

https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.10#pick

| improve this answer | |
  • just watched one of your vids .. fireship is awesome! – dragi Jun 27 at 17:20
0

Using a simple for loop and get object by key.

const acceptedValues = ["value1","value3"]
const myObject = {
    prop1:"value1",
    prop2:"value2",
    prop3:"value3"
}

Object.prototype.getKeyByValue = function( value ) {
    for( var prop in this ) {
        if( this.hasOwnProperty( prop ) ) {
             if( this[ prop ] === value )
                 return prop;
        }
    }
}

for (var i in acceptedValues) {
  if (myObject.getKeyByValue(acceptedValues[i])){
    console.log(acceptedValues[i]);
  }
}

| improve this answer | |
0
function filter(myObject){
  var obj=Object.assign({},myObject);
  Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key) {
      if(acceptedValues.indexOf(obj[key])<0) delete obj[key];
  });
  return obj;
}
const filteredObject=filter(myObject);
| improve this answer | |
0

Since I haven't seen an answer using Object.entries here's one. Note, due to Object.entries() implementation being significantly slower than Object.keys(), this will also be slower than the accepted answer, but some may prefer this for readability or extendability (easier to pass a different filtering function).

const acceptedValues = ["value1", "value3"];
const myObject = {
    prop1:"value1",
    prop2:"value2",
    prop3:"value3"
};
const filteredEntries = Object.entries(myObject).filter(([, v]) => acceptedValues.includes(v));
const filteredObject = Object.fromEntries(filteredEntries);

Or as a longish one-liner:

const filteredObject = Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(myObject).filter(([, v]) => accepted.includes(v)));
| improve this answer | |

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