1

The sql statement is a simple union all between two queries. Each one on its own is instantaneous. Union all them however and it becomes 20x slower. Any help is appreciated.

SELECT 
     1
FROM 
     [fnGetEmployeeProfileDoctorsMultiplePeriods](
          @FromPeriodId, 
          @ToPeriodId, 
          @ProfileId, 
          @EmployeeId, 
          @GeographicalAreaId, 
          @DoctorId, 
          @TeamId
     )
UNION ALL   
SELECT 
     1
FROM 
     [fnGetEmployeeProfileOrganizationsMultiplePeriods](
          @FromPeriodId, 
          @ToPeriodId, 
          @ProfileId, 
          @EmployeeId, 
          @GeographicalAreaId, 
          @DoctorId, 
          @TeamId
      )

Update:

It seems that adding the union operator causes the execution plan for the two sub-queries to change; the query engine does not simply concatenate the two original plans. Using the option recompile flag fixes this (or rather, creates a much faster plan), so how can one force it to use the recompiled plan instead?

Plan links:

Slow version

https://www.brentozar.com/pastetheplan/?id=SyZq2Ybbb

Quick version with option(recompile) set

https://www.brentozar.com/pastetheplan/?id=HJ5bpYbZZ

Update 2:

After much optimization in the two subqueries, the symptoms remain, but the execution plans now don't change on adding the union operator. Also, if you use a top operator in a way that obtains the results from only the first subquery (or, surprise, only the second one), the results come back immediately. 'Cross the border' and request results from both however, and a 5 second penalty is added.

6
  • 1
    One suspects it is the UDF and not the UNION ALL. May 18 '17 at 18:58
  • Why would the UDF matter? Each of these calls takes 1 sec, so why would a union all take 15? It should be a simple concatenation, nothing more
    – mido
    May 18 '17 at 18:59
  • Check out your execution plan, but I might suspect parameter sniffing.
    – HLGEM
    May 18 '17 at 19:02
  • @mido Maybe check your table indexes too. They can be in most cases the slowness source in a db.
    – user7941334
    May 18 '17 at 19:09
  • @mido do an EXPLAIN for selecting on each table. Maybe you see something suspect. And then on the union too.
    – user7941334
    May 18 '17 at 19:13
1

I am betting that your table valued functions are multi statement table valued functions. If possible, rewrite them as inline table valued functions.

Inline table-valued functions vs scalar and multi-statement table-valued functions

"If it’s not inline, it’s rubbish." - Rob Farley

Reference:

2
  • They're inline I'm afraid, but you're correct; multi statement functions should be avoided
    – mido
    May 18 '17 at 19:04
  • @mido post the creation scripts for them.
    – SqlZim
    May 18 '17 at 19:05
1

Have you tried inserting each function into a temp table and then querying the temp table instead? For instance, you would create the temp table and then have separate insert statements for each function.

CREATE TABLE #Employee
(
Record INT 
) 


INSERT INTO #Employee
    ( Record )

SELECT 1
FROM [fnGetEmployeeProfileDoctorsMultiplePeriods](@FromPeriodId, @ToPeriodId, @ProfileId, @EmployeeId, @GeographicalAreaId, @DoctorId, @TeamId)


INSERT INTO #Employee
    ( Record )

SELECT 1
FROM [fnGetEmployeeProfileOrganizationsMultiplePeriods](@FromPeriodId, @ToPeriodId, @ProfileId, @EmployeeId, @GeographicalAreaId, @DoctorId, @TeamId)


SELECT * 
FROM #Employee
0

Thanks to everyone who contributed.

Research into this has opened the vast domain of sql query optimization to me. By that I mean I delved into indexed views, sql hints (noexpand, merge/hash joins, etc...) and materialized hierarchical tables. Quite a hectic ride it was.

1
  • 1
    So what was the solution? Have you found one?
    – Giedrius
    Aug 20 '20 at 12:29
0

I was having the same issue.

--Requete 67. Performance cost 6%
SELECT * 
INTO #temp_arbo_of_6 
FROM (
SELECT * FROM #temp_arbo_of_4
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM #temp_arbo_of_5
) AS tmp;

each table has 60 columns. Takes up 6% of the global timing of an analytic stored procedure. It shouldn't.

Solved it this way:

--Requete 67. Performance cost 0%
INSERT INTO #temp_arbo_of_4
SELECT * FROM #temp_arbo_of_5;

and then using #temp_arbo_of_4 instead of #temp_arbo_of_6. I didn't need both.

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