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As of Windows 10 PowerShell is finally capable of creating Junctions and links natively.

Howerver the Remove-Item function seems to be unaware of the junction and tries to remove the directory asking for confirmation and if it should recursively delete items within.

So, the question is: Is there a way to remove a junction using PowerShell native Cmdlets? (i.e. without calling cmd)

4 Answers 4

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Is there a way to remove a junction using PowerShell?

Currently, at least in PowerShell v5, this is considered "fixed". What you can do is use the -Force switch, else you will get an error calling the path an NTFS junction. The reason that I at least use the quotes on fixed is that using the switch will still make the message about children in the directory show up. Selecting Y will still only delete the junction in my testing using PSv5.

Remove-Item "C:\temp\junction" -Force -Confirm:$False

If that doesn't work for you or you don't have v5 you can use the .Net method to delete a directory. This appears to work correctly as well.

[io.directory]::Delete("C:\temp\junction")
4
  • 1
    Thx for the link. Apparently it's still somewhat broken in PS5.1. New-Item -Type symboliclink -Path D:\test -Value D:\testtest Remove-Item "D:\test" Fails due to missing Force parameter (after asking for confirmation): Remove-Item "D:\test" -Force and Remove-Item "D:\test" -Recurse Fails due to conflict between marker in request and analysis point (freely translated from german) after asking for confirmation. Remove-Item "D:\test" -Force -Recurse Fails the same but doesn't need confirmation. May 19, 2017 at 20:34
  • With a junction however you can remove it without having to confirm by adding both force and recurse: i.e.: New-Item -Type junction -Path D:\test -Value D:\testtest Remove-Item "D:\test" -Force -Recurse" May 19, 2017 at 20:37
  • While doing this command, I'm getting an error. (Run the PowerShell command in admin mode) ----------- Confirm The item at C:\Users*******\OneDrive\Desktop\FolderToDelete has children and the Recurse parameter was not specified. If you continue, all children will be removed with the item. Are you sure you want to continue? [Y] Yes [A] Yes to All [N] No [L] No to All [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is "Y"): Y Remove-Item : Access to the cloud file is denied At line:1 char:1 + Remove-Item -path "C:\Users*******\OneDrive\D ... Jan 24, 2022 at 5:35
  • @JyothisTS I think your problem is slightly different in that it's not really a junction, but instead some special file attribute which makes the cloud-only files that have not been persisted to your drive impossible to delete via Powershell. Best to ask the question yourself with some more context to it. Mar 3, 2022 at 17:23
2

have a try on this "command-let":

cmd /c rmdir .\Target

source:Powershell Remove-Item and symbolic links

1
  • While that is technically correct, it's not really what I was looking for. I've clarified my question to make it more clear I was looking for a PowerShell native Cmdlet and not a let-cmd-do-it hack. May 19, 2017 at 20:41
2

Simple command -

rm [path of file] -Force
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  • You forgot to add -Recurse, but otherwise, yes you can of course use the shortcut as well. Nov 19, 2019 at 16:50
0

After search by Google for a long time, I found the answer:

function Remove-Any-File-Force ($Target) {
    if ( Test-Path -Path "$Target" ){
        & $env:SystemRoot\System32\ATTRIB.exe -S -H -R "$Target" >$null 2>$null
    } else {
        return
    }
    $TargetAttributes = (Get-Item -Path $Target -Force).Attributes.ToString()
    if ($TargetAttributes -match "ReparsePoint") {
        if ($TargetAttributes -match "Archive") {
            Remove-Item -Path "$Target" -Force
        } else {
            try {
                & $env:SystemRoot\System32\cmd.exe /c rmdir /Q "$Target" >$null 2>$null
            } catch {
                try {
                    [io.directory]::Delete("$Target")
                } catch {
                    Remove-Item -Path "$Target" -Force
                }
            }
        }    
    } else {
        if ($TargetAttributes -match "Directory") {
            Remove-Item -Path "$Target" -Force -Recurse
        } else {
            Remove-Item -Path "$Target" -Force
        }
    }
}

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