53

It's easy to set a user agent on an HttpRequest, but often I want to use a single HttpClient and use the same user agent every time, rather than having to set it on each request.

105

You can solve this easily using:

HttpClient _client = new HttpClient();
_client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("User-Agent", "C# App");
| improve this answer | |
42

Using DefaultRequestHeaders.Add(...) did not work for me.

var httpClient = new HttpClient();
httpClient.DefaultRequestHeaders.UserAgent.ParseAdd("Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; AcmeInc/1.0)");
| improve this answer | |
16

The following worked for me in a .NET Standard 2.0 library:

HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
ProductHeaderValue header = new ProductHeaderValue("MyAwesomeLibrary", Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Version.ToString());
ProductInfoHeaderValue userAgent = new ProductInfoHeaderValue(header);
client.DefaultRequestHeaders.UserAgent.Add(userAgent);
// User-Agent: MyAwesomeLibrary/1.0.0.0
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  • 4
    Short addition: The UserAgent class also offers TryParse, which comes especially handy when there is no version number (for whatever reason). The RFC explicitly allows this case. – JensG May 4 '19 at 10:31
11

Using JensG comment

Short addition: The UserAgent class also offers TryParse, which comes especially handy when there is no version number (for whatever reason). The RFC explicitly allows this case.

on this answer

using System.Net.Http;
using (var httpClient = new HttpClient())
{
    httpClient.DefaultRequestHeaders
      .UserAgent
      .TryParseAdd("Mike D's Agent");
    //User-Agent: Mike D's Agent
}
| improve this answer | |

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