Is there a library that will find the square root of a BigInteger? I want it computed offline - only once, and not inside any loop. So even computationally expensive solution is okay.

I don't want to find some algorithm and implement. A readily available solution will be perfect.

  • Is converting the BigInteger to something that java.lang.Math can use, or does it need to remain as a BigInteger? – Martijn Verburg Dec 10 '10 at 10:31
  • 1
    600851475143 is the number. Can it be represented by something that Math can use? I couldn't, so resorted to BigInteger. If you were wondering, it is related to a problem from ProjectEuler :) – user529141 Dec 10 '10 at 11:18
  • Do you mean just one number and once? Then hard code the value computed from say wolframalpha? – Fakrudeen Dec 10 '10 at 11:45
  • True. But I'd like to know how to do it in Java. I may encounter a problem where I have to find it during run-time :) – user529141 Dec 10 '10 at 13:22
  • 4
    Project Euler Problem 3 =) I think that number (600851475143) can just be stored as a long (long n = 600851475143L). – Carl G Dec 16 '12 at 2:10

18 Answers 18

Just for fun:

public static BigInteger sqrt(BigInteger x) {
    BigInteger div = BigInteger.ZERO.setBit(x.bitLength()/2);
    BigInteger div2 = div;
    // Loop until we hit the same value twice in a row, or wind
    // up alternating.
    for(;;) {
        BigInteger y = div.add(x.divide(div)).shiftRight(1);
        if (y.equals(div) || y.equals(div2))
            return y;
        div2 = div;
        div = y;
    }
}
  • 1
    +1. great answer . :) – TheLostMind Sep 3 '14 at 6:31
  • Yes, this is a great general solution for any (positive) BigInteger, and it's not slow either. For a BigInteger with a thousand digits it only needs eleven iterations of that loop to get its square root, which seems pretty amazing to me. I wonder why BigInteger doesn't have a square root method as part of its API? – skomisa Sep 18 '14 at 2:19
  • I suspect that BigInteger exists to support encryption, which doesn't need square root. Just a guess, though. – Edward Falk Feb 20 '15 at 1:43
  • 2
    According to the algorithm above, sqrt(8) = 3... Don't use as-is, termination condition is not quite correct! (we want the /lesser/ of the two-cycle, when it happens... ie. x = k^2-1) – BadZen Dec 29 '16 at 19:25
  • Huh. Never tried it with small numbers. – Edward Falk Dec 29 '16 at 20:18

I know of no library solution for your question. You'll have to import an external library solution from somewhere. What I give you below is less complicated than getting an external library.

You can create your own external library solution in a class with two static methods as shown below and add that to your collection of external libraries. The methods don't need to be instance methods and so they are static and, conveniently, you don't have to instance the class to use them. The norm for integer square roots is a floor value (i.e. the largest integer less than or equal to the square root), so you may need only the one static method, the floor method, in the class below for the floor value and can choose to ignore the ceiling (i.e. the smallest integer greater than or equal to the square root) method version. Right now, they are in the default package, but you can add a package statement to put them in whatever package you find convenient.

The methods are dirt simple and the iterations converge to the closest integer answer very, very fast. They throw an IllegalArgumentException if you try to give them a negative argument. You can change the exception to another one, but you must ensure that a negatve argument throws some kind of exception or at least doesn't attempt the computation. Integer square roots of negative numbers don't exist since we are not in the realm of imaginary numbers.

These come from very well known simple iterative integer square root algorithms that have been used in hand computations for centuries. It works by averaging an overestimate and underestimate to converge to a better estimate. This may be repeated until the estimate is as close as is desired.

They are based on y1 = ((x/y0) + y0) / 2 converging to the largest integer, yn, where yn * yn <= x.

This will give you a floor value for a BigInteger square root, y, of x where y * y <= x and (y + 1) * (y + 1) > x.

An adaptation can give you a ceiling value for BigInteger square root, y, of x where y * y >= x and (y - 1) * (y - 1) < x

Both methods have been tested and work. They are here:

import java.math.BigInteger;

public class BigIntSqRoot {

public static BigInteger bigIntSqRootFloor(BigInteger x)
        throws IllegalArgumentException {
    if (x.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) < 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Negative argument.");
    }
    // square roots of 0 and 1 are trivial and
    // y == 0 will cause a divide-by-zero exception
    if (x .equals(BigInteger.ZERO) || x.equals(BigInteger.ONE)) {
        return x;
    } // end if
    BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2L);
    BigInteger y;
    // starting with y = x / 2 avoids magnitude issues with x squared
    for (y = x.divide(two);
            y.compareTo(x.divide(y)) > 0;
            y = ((x.divide(y)).add(y)).divide(two));
    return y;
} // end bigIntSqRootFloor

public static BigInteger bigIntSqRootCeil(BigInteger x)
        throws IllegalArgumentException {
    if (x.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) < 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Negative argument.");
    }
    // square roots of 0 and 1 are trivial and
    // y == 0 will cause a divide-by-zero exception
    if (x == BigInteger.ZERO || x == BigInteger.ONE) {
        return x;
    } // end if
    BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2L);
    BigInteger y;
    // starting with y = x / 2 avoids magnitude issues with x squared
    for (y = x.divide(two);
            y.compareTo(x.divide(y)) > 0;
            y = ((x.divide(y)).add(y)).divide(two));
    if (x.compareTo(y.multiply(y)) == 0) {
        return y;
    } else {
        return y.add(BigInteger.ONE);
    }
} // end bigIntSqRootCeil
} // end class bigIntSqRoot
  • Great methods. But I have a problem. After some operations with BigInteger I have a "1". That should be no problem at all because of the check you do with BigInteger.ONE, but that's not my case. The method continue and I get the divide-by-zero exception. Is it possible that the value isn't actually 1, but slightly different? On the console I get a "value = 1" so it seems it is correct. – David Corsalini Feb 28 '13 at 15:54
  • I'm using these to implement this in my project. – David Corsalini Feb 28 '13 at 15:55
  • 3
    change == to .equals and it seems to work – Eric Kim Apr 13 '13 at 1:48
  • Does this aproximation has its own name? Thanks. – ivan.mylyanyk May 6 '13 at 10:57
  • 2
    Yes. I got it (and have used it for decades) from Abramowitz and Stegun's Handbook of Mathematical Functions -- an NBS publication on mathematics. I don't recall a name in the handbook. Wikipedia says it is called the Babylonian method and, alternatively, Hero's method (Hero of Alexandria). According to Wikipedia, it predate's Newton's method by about 16 centuries which makes it older than dirt. It may well predate the invention of fire. It is, or was, perhaps, the most commonly used manual method of calculating square roots with nothing but arithemetic and writing tools. – Jim Aug 30 '13 at 8:29

I can't verify the accuracy of them but there are several home grown solutions when googling. The best of them seemed to be this one: http://www.merriampark.com/bigsqrt.htm

Also try the Apache commons Math project (once Apache recovers from its bombardment after the JCP blog post).

  • 5
    Link now seems broken – Eran Medan Mar 22 '13 at 22:37
  • Replaced with link to archive.org – Edward Falk Jul 11 '15 at 22:14

As Jigar states, Newton's iteration is both quite simple to understand and to implement. I'll leave it up to others decide whether it is the most efficient algorithm or not for finding the square root of a number.

With recursion it can be done in just about two lines.

private static BigInteger newtonIteration(BigInteger n, BigInteger x0)
{
    final BigInteger x1 = n.divide(x0).add(x0).shiftRight(1);
    return x0.equals(x1)||x0.equals(x1.subtract(BigInteger.ONE)) ? x0 : newtonIteration(n, x1);
}

Where n is the number we want to find the square root of, and x0 is the number from the previous call, which will always be 1 when initiate the first call from another method. So preferably, you will complement it with something like this as well;

public static BigInteger sqrt(final BigInteger number)
{
    if(number.signum() == -1)
        throw new ArithmeticException("We can only calculate the square root of positive numbers.");
    return newtonIteration(number, BigInteger.ONE);
}

I needed to have the square root for BigIntegers for implementing the quadratic sieve. I used some of the solutions here but the absolutely fastest and best solution so far is from Google Guava's BigInteger library.

Documentation can be found here.

An alternative approach, which is quite light. Speed-wise, Mantono's answer, that uses the Newton method, might be preferable for certain cases.

Here's my approach...

public static BigInteger sqrt(BigInteger n) {
    BigInteger a = BigInteger.ONE;
    BigInteger b = n.shiftRight(1).add(new BigInteger("2")); // (n >> 1) + 2 (ensure 0 doesn't show up)
    while (b.compareTo(a) >= 0) {
        BigInteger mid = a.add(b).shiftRight(1); // (a+b) >> 1
        if (mid.multiply(mid).compareTo(n) > 0)
            b = mid.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
        else
            a = mid.add(BigInteger.ONE);
    }
    return a.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
}
  • I tested this approach and it worked, montano's answer gave me wrong results for most numbers. Note: here the roots are rounded down. – maraca May 18 '17 at 22:59

For an initial guess I would use Math.sqrt(bi.doubleValue()) and you can use the links already suggested to make the answer more accurate.

  • Bloody brilliant. I'm genuinely annoyed I didn't think of that. – Edward Falk May 29 '13 at 14:34
  • 1
    Actually, I just came up with another way to compute the initial guess: BigInteger.ZERO.setBit(bi.bitLength()/2) – Edward Falk Jun 5 '13 at 18:44
  • 1
    But this is only a viable approach if your BigInteger's value happens to lie within double's range of possible values, right? – skomisa Sep 17 '14 at 3:18
  • 1
    @EdwardFalk limited to 16 digit numbers and a large exponent. – Peter Lawrey Jun 1 '16 at 9:28
  • 1
    @EdwardFalk you can always check Double.isFinite(x) to see if the value before the sqrt is small enough. – Peter Lawrey Jun 2 '16 at 8:26

This is the best (and shortest) working solution I've found

http://faruk.akgul.org/blog/javas-missing-algorithm-biginteger-sqrt/

Here is the code:

  public static BigInteger sqrt(BigInteger n) {
    BigInteger a = BigInteger.ONE;
    BigInteger b = new BigInteger(n.shiftRight(5).add(new BigInteger("8")).toString());
    while(b.compareTo(a) >= 0) {
      BigInteger mid = new BigInteger(a.add(b).shiftRight(1).toString());
      if(mid.multiply(mid).compareTo(n) > 0) b = mid.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
      else a = mid.add(BigInteger.ONE);
    }
    return a.subtract(BigInteger.ONE);
  }

I've tested it and it's working correctly (and seems fast)

  • that's short, but it's efficiency is O(nnlog(n)) where n is the length of BigInteger. This is of binary search and multiplying, which works for O(n*n). – ivan.mylyanyk Apr 13 '13 at 22:48
  • 4
    He also converts back and forth to String. Why? – Edward Falk May 29 '13 at 1:23
    BigDecimal BDtwo = new BigDecimal("2");
    BigDecimal BDtol = new BigDecimal(".000000001");    
private BigDecimal bigIntSQRT(BigDecimal lNew, BigDecimal lOld, BigDecimal n) {
        lNew = lOld.add(n.divide(lOld, 9, BigDecimal.ROUND_FLOOR)).divide(BDtwo, 9, BigDecimal.ROUND_FLOOR);
        if (lOld.subtract(lNew).abs().compareTo(BDtol) == 1) {
            lNew = bigIntSQRT(lNew, lNew, n);
        }
    return lNew;
}

I was just working on this problem and successfully wrote a recursive square root finder in Java. You can change the BDtol to whatever you want, but this runs fairly quickly and gave me the follow example as a result:

Original number 146783911423364576743092537299333563769268393112173908757133540102089006265925538868650825438150202201473025

SQRT --> 383123885216472214589586756787577295328224028242477055.000000000

Then for confirmation 146783911423364576743092537299333563769268393112173908757133540102089006265925538868650825438150202201473025.000000000000000000

Update (23July2018) : This technique does not apper to work for larger values. Have posted a different technique based on binary-search below.


I was looking into factorization and ended up writing this.

package com.example.so.math;

import java.math.BigInteger;

/**
 * 
 * <p>https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4407839/how-can-i-find-the-square-root-of-a-java-biginteger</p>
 * @author Ravindra
 * @since 06August2017
 *
 */
public class BigIntegerSquareRoot {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int[] values = {5,11,25,31,36,42,49,64,100,121};

        for (int i : values) {
            BigInteger result = handleSquareRoot(BigInteger.valueOf(i));
            System.out.println(i+":"+result);
        }


    }


    private static BigInteger handleSquareRoot(BigInteger modulus) {

        int MAX_LOOP_COUNT = 100; // arbitrary for now.. but needs to be proportional to sqrt(modulus)

        BigInteger result = null;

        if( modulus.equals(BigInteger.ONE) ) {
            result = BigInteger.ONE;
            return result;
        }

        for(int i=2;i<MAX_LOOP_COUNT && i<modulus.intValue();i++) { // base-values can be list of primes...
            //System.out.println("i"+i);
            BigInteger bigIntegerBaseTemp = BigInteger.valueOf(i);
            BigInteger bigIntegerRemainderTemp = bigIntegerBaseTemp.modPow(modulus, modulus);
            BigInteger bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBase = bigIntegerRemainderTemp.subtract(bigIntegerBaseTemp);
            BigInteger bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBaseFinal = bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBase;

            BigInteger resultTemp = null;
            if(bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBase.signum() == -1 || bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBase.signum() == 1) {

                bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBaseFinal = bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBase.add(modulus);
                resultTemp = bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBaseFinal.gcd(modulus);

            } else if(bigIntegerRemainderSubtractedByBase.signum() == 0) {
                resultTemp = bigIntegerBaseTemp.gcd(modulus);
            }

            if( resultTemp.multiply(resultTemp).equals(modulus) ) {
                System.out.println("Found square root for modulus :"+modulus);
                result = resultTemp;
                break;
            }
        }

        return result;
    }


}

The approach can be visualized like this :

Powers of Integers Moduluo - N

Hope this helps!

  • Can you explain the colored table a bit? – user unknown Mar 24 at 8:30
  • 1
    That's called as table of - 'Powers of Integers Moduluo n'. In this case 'n' is 25. You can find a bit more information in this PPT pertaining to a book called Cryptography and Network Security - Author William Stallings. For even more information refer the book itself! – Ravindra HV Mar 24 at 16:44
  • 1
    PS : To explain the table itself, basically if one observes the column corresponding to 'n' in this case '25', if you subtract it by the base, then the gcd of - (remainder subtracted by the base) and 'n' itself is non-zero. I am using that property to determine if the number is a square and if yes, through gcd, what that number is. Its just something I've found over time...but if you do encounter it in any paper do post the link! – Ravindra HV Mar 24 at 16:53
  • Update : This technique does not apper to work for larger values. Have posted a different technique based on binary-search below. – Ravindra HV Jul 23 at 2:56

Strange that nobody has mentioned it earlier but in java 9 you have sqrt in BigInteger, so you can just use it like that:

BigInteger b = BigInteger.valueOf(64);
BigInteger eight = b.sqrt();

https://docs.oracle.com/javase/9/docs/api/java/math/BigInteger.html#sqrt--

I am only going as far as the integer part of the square root but you can modify this rough algo to go to as much more precision as you want:

  public static void main(String args[]) {
    BigInteger N = new BigInteger(
            "17976931348623159077293051907890247336179769789423065727343008115"
                    + "77326758055056206869853794492129829595855013875371640157101398586"
                    + "47833778606925583497541085196591615128057575940752635007475935288"
                    + "71082364994994077189561705436114947486504671101510156394068052754"
                    + "0071584560878577663743040086340742855278549092581");
    System.out.println(N.toString(10).length());
    String sqrt = "";
    BigInteger divisor = BigInteger.ZERO;
    BigInteger toDivide = BigInteger.ZERO;
    String Nstr = N.toString(10);
    if (Nstr.length() % 2 == 1)
        Nstr = "0" + Nstr;
    for (int digitCount = 0; digitCount < Nstr.length(); digitCount += 2) {
        toDivide = toDivide.multiply(BigInteger.TEN).multiply(
                BigInteger.TEN);
        toDivide = toDivide.add(new BigInteger(Nstr.substring(digitCount,
                digitCount + 2)));
        String div = divisor.toString(10);
        divisor = divisor.add(new BigInteger(
                div.substring(div.length() - 1)));
        int into = tryMax(divisor, toDivide);
        divisor = divisor.multiply(BigInteger.TEN).add(
                BigInteger.valueOf(into));
        toDivide = toDivide.subtract(divisor.multiply(BigInteger
                .valueOf(into)));
        sqrt = sqrt + into;
    }
    System.out.println(String.format("Sqrt(%s) = %s", N, sqrt));
}

private static int tryMax(final BigInteger divisor,
        final BigInteger toDivide) {
    for (int i = 9; i > 0; i--) {
        BigInteger div = divisor.multiply(BigInteger.TEN).add(
                BigInteger.valueOf(i));
        if (div.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(i)).compareTo(toDivide) <= 0)
            return i;
    }
    return 0;
}
  • since I am only displaying the integral part, it is the floor of the square root. – Ustaman Sangat Oct 23 '12 at 4:20

The C# language has similar syntax to Java. I wrote this recursive solution.

    static BigInteger fsqrt(BigInteger n)
    {
        string sn = n.ToString();
        return guess(n, BigInteger.Parse(sn.Substring(0, sn.Length >> 1)), 0);          
    }
    static BigInteger guess(BigInteger n, BigInteger g, BigInteger last)
    {
        if (last >= g - 1 && last <= g + 1) return g;
        else return guess(n, (g + (n / g)) >> 1, g);
    }

Call this code like this (in Java I guess it would be "System.out.print").

Console.WriteLine(fsqrt(BigInteger.Parse("783648276815623658365871365876257862874628734627835648726")));

And the answer is: 27993718524262253829858552106

Disclaimer: I understand this method doesn't work for numbers less than 10; this is a BigInteger square root method.

This is easily remedied. Change the first method to the following to give the recursive portion some room to breathe.

    static BigInteger fsqrt(BigInteger n)
    {
        if (n > 999)
        {
           string sn = n.ToString();
           return guess(n, BigInteger.Parse(sn.Substring(0, sn.Length >> 1)), 0);
        }
        else return guess(n, n >> 1, 0);            
    }

Simplified Jim answer and improved performance.

public class BigIntSqRoot {
    private static BigInteger two = BigInteger.valueOf(2L);

    public static BigInteger bigIntSqRootFloor(BigInteger x)
            throws IllegalArgumentException {
        if (checkTrivial(x)) {
            return x;
        }
        if (x.bitLength() < 64) { // Can be cast to long
            double sqrt = Math.sqrt(x.longValue());
            return BigInteger.valueOf(Math.round(sqrt));
        }
        // starting with y = x / 2 avoids magnitude issues with x squared
        BigInteger y = x.divide(two);
        BigInteger value = x.divide(y);
        while (y.compareTo(value) > 0) {
            y = value.add(y).divide(two);
            value = x.divide(y);
        }
        return y;
    }

    public static BigInteger bigIntSqRootCeil(BigInteger x)
            throws IllegalArgumentException {
        BigInteger y = bigIntSqRootFloor(x);
        if (x.compareTo(y.multiply(y)) == 0) {
            return y;
        }
        return y.add(BigInteger.ONE);
    }

    private static boolean checkTrivial(BigInteger x) {
        if (x == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("x can't be null");
        }
        if (x.compareTo(BigInteger.ZERO) < 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Negative argument.");
        }

        // square roots of 0 and 1 are trivial and
        // y == 0 will cause a divide-by-zero exception
        if (x.equals(BigInteger.ZERO) || x.equals(BigInteger.ONE)) {
            return true;
        } // end if
        return false;
    }
}

you can also use binary search to find the square root of x also you can multiply it to for example 10^10 and find an integer like m by binary search since m^2

System.out.println(m.divide(10^5)+"."+m.mod(10^5));

Here's a solution that does not use BigInteger.multiply or BigInteger.divide:

    private static final BigInteger ZERO  = BigInteger.ZERO;
    private static final BigInteger ONE   = BigInteger.ONE;
    private static final BigInteger TWO   = BigInteger.valueOf(2);
    private static final BigInteger THREE = BigInteger.valueOf(3);

    /**
     * This method computes sqrt(n) in O(n.bitLength()) time,
     * and computes it exactly. By "exactly", I mean it returns
     * not only the (floor of the) square root s, but also the
     * remainder r, such that r >= 0, n = s^2 + r, and
     * n < (s + 1)^2.
     *
     * @param n The argument n, as described above.
     *
     * @return An array of two values, where the first element
     *         of the array is s and the second is r, as
     *         described above.
     *
     * @throws IllegalArgumentException if n is not nonnegative.
     */
    public static BigInteger[] sqrt(BigInteger n) {
        if (n == null || n.signum() < 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }

        int bl = n.bitLength();
        if ((bl & 1) != 0) {
            ++ bl;
        }

        BigInteger s = ZERO;
        BigInteger r = ZERO;

        while (bl >= 2) {
            s = s.shiftLeft(1);

            BigInteger crumb = n.testBit(-- bl)
                                ? (n.testBit(-- bl) ? THREE : TWO)
                                : (n.testBit(-- bl) ? ONE : ZERO);
            r = r.shiftLeft(2).add(crumb);

            BigInteger d = s.shiftLeft(1);
            if (d.compareTo(r) < 0) {
                s = s.add(ONE);
                r = r.subtract(d).subtract(ONE);
            }
        }

        assert r.signum() >= 0;
        assert n.equals(s.multiply(s).add(r));
        assert n.compareTo(s.add(ONE).multiply(s.add(ONE))) < 0;

        return new BigInteger[] {s, r};
    }

The answer I posted above doesn't work for large numbers (but interestingly so!). As such posting a binary-search approach for determining square root for correctness.

package com.example.so.squareroot;

import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

/**
 * <p>https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4407839/how-can-i-find-the-square-root-of-a-java-biginteger</p>
 * <p> Determine square-root of a number or its closest whole number (binary-search-approach) </p>
 * @author Ravindra
 * @since 07-July-2018
 * 
 */
public class BigIntegerSquareRootV2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        List<BigInteger> listOfSquares = new ArrayList<BigInteger>();
        listOfSquares.add(BigInteger.valueOf(5).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(5)).pow(2));
        listOfSquares.add(BigInteger.valueOf(11).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(11)).pow(2));
        listOfSquares.add(BigInteger.valueOf(15485863).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(10000019)).pow(2));
        listOfSquares.add(BigInteger.valueOf(533000401).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(982451653)).pow(2));
        listOfSquares.add(BigInteger.valueOf(11).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(23)));
        listOfSquares.add(BigInteger.valueOf(11).multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(23)).pow(2));


        for (BigInteger bigIntegerNumber : listOfSquares) {

            BigInteger squareRoot = calculateSquareRoot(bigIntegerNumber);

            System.out.println("Result :"+bigIntegerNumber+":"+squareRoot);
        }


        System.out.println("*********************************************************************");

        for (BigInteger bigIntegerNumber : listOfSquares) {

            BigInteger squareRoot = determineClosestWholeNumberSquareRoot(bigIntegerNumber);

            System.out.println("Result :"+bigIntegerNumber+":"+squareRoot);
        }

    }


    /*
Result :625:25
Result :14641:121
Result :23981286414105556927200571609:154858924231397
Result :274206311533451346298141971207799609:523647125012112853
Result :253:null
Result :64009:253
     */

    public static BigInteger calculateSquareRoot(BigInteger number) { 

        /*
         * Can be optimized by passing a bean to store the comparison result and avoid having to re-calculate.
         */
        BigInteger squareRootResult = determineClosestWholeNumberSquareRoot(number);
        if( squareRootResult.pow(2).equals(number)) {
            return squareRootResult;
        }

        return null;
    }


    /*
Result :625:25
Result :14641:121
Result :23981286414105556927200571609:154858924231397
Result :274206311533451346298141971207799609:523647125012112853
Result :253:15
Result :64009:253
     */
    private static BigInteger determineClosestWholeNumberSquareRoot(BigInteger number) {

        BigInteger result = null;

        if(number.equals(BigInteger.ONE)) {
            return BigInteger.ONE;
        } else if( number.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(2)) ) {
            return BigInteger.ONE;
        } else if( number.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(3)) ) {
            return BigInteger.ONE;
        } else if( number.equals(BigInteger.valueOf(4)) ) {
            return BigInteger.valueOf(2);
        }

        BigInteger tempBaseLow = BigInteger.valueOf(2);
        BigInteger tempBaseHigh = number.shiftRight(1); // divide by 2

        int loopCount = 11;

        while(true) {

            if( tempBaseHigh.subtract(tempBaseLow).compareTo(BigInteger.valueOf(loopCount)) == -1 ) { // for lower numbers use for-loop
                //System.out.println("Breaking out of while-loop.."); // uncomment-for-debugging
                break;
            }

            BigInteger tempBaseMid = tempBaseHigh.subtract(tempBaseLow).shiftRight(1).add(tempBaseLow); // effectively mid = [(high-low)/2]+low
            BigInteger tempBaseMidSquared = tempBaseMid.pow(2);
            int comparisonResultTemp = tempBaseMidSquared.compareTo(number);


            if(comparisonResultTemp == -1) { // move mid towards higher number
                tempBaseLow = tempBaseMid;
            } else if( comparisonResultTemp == 0 ) { // number is a square ! return the same !
                    return tempBaseMid;
            } else { // move mid towards lower number
                tempBaseHigh = tempBaseMid;
            }

        }

        BigInteger tempBasePrevious = tempBaseLow;
        BigInteger tempBaseCurrent = tempBaseLow;
        for(int i=0;i<(loopCount+1);i++) {
            BigInteger tempBaseSquared = tempBaseCurrent.pow(2);
            //System.out.println("Squared :"+tempBaseSquared); // uncomment-for-debugging
            int comparisonResultTempTwo = tempBaseSquared.compareTo(number);

            if( comparisonResultTempTwo == -1 ) { // move current to previous and increment current...
                tempBasePrevious = tempBaseCurrent;
                tempBaseCurrent = tempBaseCurrent.add(BigInteger.ONE);
            } else if( comparisonResultTempTwo == 0 ) { // is an exact match!
                tempBasePrevious = tempBaseCurrent;
                break;
            } else { // we've identified the point of deviation.. break..
                //System.out.println("breaking out of for-loop for square root..."); // uncomment-for-debugging
                break;
            }
        }

        result = tempBasePrevious;

        //System.out.println("Returning :"+result); // uncomment-for-debugging
        return result;

    }


}

Regards Ravindra

A single line can do the job I think.

Math.pow(bigInt.doubleValue(), (1/n));
  • 1
    That will fail for numbers greater than double can repesent (approx 1.7e308) and will only return as much precision as a double. – Edward Falk May 31 '16 at 17:58

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