36

When making a semi-log plot (y is log), the minor tick marks (8 in a decade) on the y axis appear automatically, but it seems that when the axis range exceeds 10**10, they disappear. I tried many ways to force them back in, but to no avail. It might be that they go away for large ranges to avoid overcrowding, but one should have a choice?

4 Answers 4

59

solution for matplotlib >= 2.0.2

Let's consider the following example

enter image description here

which is produced by this code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker
import numpy as np

y = np.arange(12)
x = 10.0**y

fig, ax=plt.subplots()
ax.plot(x,y)
ax.set_xscale("log")
plt.show()

The minor ticklabels are indeed gone and usual ways to show them (like plt.tick_params(axis='x', which='minor')) fail.

The first step would then be to show all powers of 10 on the axis,

locmaj = matplotlib.ticker.LogLocator(base=10,numticks=12) 
ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(locmaj)

enter image description here

where the trick is to set numticks to a number equal or larger the number of ticks (i.e. 12 or higher in this case).

Then, we can add minor ticklabels as

locmin = matplotlib.ticker.LogLocator(base=10.0,subs=(0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8),numticks=12)
ax.xaxis.set_minor_locator(locmin)
ax.xaxis.set_minor_formatter(matplotlib.ticker.NullFormatter())

enter image description here

Note that I restricted this to include 4 minor ticks per decade (using 8 is equally possible but in this example would overcrowd the axes). Also note that numticks is again (quite unintuitively) 12 or larger.

Finally we need to use a NullFormatter() for the minor ticks, in order not to have any ticklabels appear for them.

solution for matplotlib 2.0.0

The following works in matplotlib 2.0.0 or below, but it does not work in matplotlib 2.0.2.

Let's consider the following example

enter image description here

which is produced by this code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker
import numpy as np

y = np.arange(12)
x = 10.0**y

fig, ax=plt.subplots()
ax.plot(x,y)
ax.set_xscale("log")
plt.show()

The minor ticklabels are indeed gone and usual ways to show them (like plt.tick_params(axis='x', which='minor')) fail.

The first step would then be to show all powers of 10 on the axis,

locmaj = matplotlib.ticker.LogLocator(base=10.0, subs=(0.1,1.0, ))
ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(locmaj)

enter image description here

Then, we can add minor ticklabels as

locmin = matplotlib.ticker.LogLocator(base=10.0, subs=(0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8,1,2,4,6,8,10 )) 
ax.xaxis.set_minor_locator(locmin)
ax.xaxis.set_minor_formatter(matplotlib.ticker.NullFormatter())

enter image description here

Note that I restricted this to include 4 minor ticks per decade (using 8 is equally possible but in this example would overcrowd the axes). Also note - and that may be the key here - that the subs argument, which gives the multiples of integer powers of the base at which to place ticks (see documentation), is given a list ranging over two decades instead of one.

Finally we need to use a NullFormatter() for the minor ticks, in order not to have any ticklabels appear for them.

10
  • 2
    In both cases subs contains too many entries, the major only needs to be (1.0 ,) and the minor should subs=np.arange(2, 10)*.1.
    – tacaswell
    Aug 27, 2017 at 17:19
  • @tacaswell the solution here needed to use subs over two decades. This was basically the whole idea to make it work. Now, it seems something has changed in between version 2.0.0 and 2.0.2, such that this workaround presented here does not work anymore and instead the more intuitive approach of using subs over one decade only works again. Aug 27, 2017 at 17:45
  • @BrandonDube I tested the "solution for matplotlib 2.0.2 or higher" with matplotlib 2.1.2 and it works fine. Jan 23, 2018 at 14:46
  • @ImportanceOfBeingErnest did you get MPL from pip or Conda? I found that the MPL from Conda is broken with the Qt backend, so it could be continuum's changes. I didn't try this again since changing to pip's MPL. Jan 24, 2018 at 5:34
  • @BrandonDube This should not depend on where you get mpl. If you have a problem with mpl and qt that is rather unrelated to the issue here. Jan 24, 2018 at 8:59
1

Major ticks with empty labels will generate ticks but no labels.

ax.set_yticks([1.E-6,1.E-5,1.E-4,1.E-3,1.E-2,1.E-1,1.E0,1.E1,1.E2,1.E3,1.E4,1.E5,])

ax.set_yticklabels(['$10^{-6}$','','','$10^{-3}$','','','$1$','','','$10^{3}$','',''])

Tick Labels

1

Wrapping the excellent answer from importanceofbeingernest for matplotlib >= 2.0.2 into a function:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from typing import Optional


def restore_minor_ticks_log_plot(
    ax: Optional[plt.Axes] = None, n_subticks=9
) -> None:
    """For axes with a logrithmic scale where the span (max-min) exceeds
    10 orders of magnitude, matplotlib will not set logarithmic minor ticks.
    If you don't like this, call this function to restore minor ticks.

    Args:
        ax:
        n_subticks: Number of Should be either 4 or 9.

    Returns:
        None
    """
    if ax is None:
        ax = plt.gca()
    # Method from SO user importanceofbeingernest at
    # https://stackoverflow.com/a/44079725/5972175
    locmaj = mpl.ticker.LogLocator(base=10, numticks=1000)
    ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(locmaj)
    locmin = mpl.ticker.LogLocator(
        base=10.0, subs=np.linspace(0, 1.0, n_subticks + 2)[1:-1], numticks=1000
    )
    ax.xaxis.set_minor_locator(locmin)
    ax.xaxis.set_minor_formatter(mpl.ticker.NullFormatter())

This function can then be called as

plt.plot(x,y)
plt.xscale("log")
restore_minor_ticks_log_plot()

or more explicitly

_, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.plot(x, y)
ax.set_xscale("log")
restore_minor_ticks_log_plot(ax)
1

From what I can tell, as of Matplotlib 3.5.2:

  • With 8 or fewer major tick marks, the minor ticks show
  • with 9 to 11 major tick marks, subs="auto" will show the minor tick marks
  • with 12 or more, you need to set subs manually.

Using subs="auto"

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt, ticker as mticker

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
y = np.arange(11)
x = 10.0**y

ax.semilogx(x, y)
ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(mticker.LogLocator(numticks=999))
ax.xaxis.set_minor_locator(mticker.LogLocator(numticks=999, subs="auto"))

enter image description here

Setting subs manually

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt, ticker as mticker

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
y = np.arange(12)
x = 10.0**y

ax.semilogx(x, y)
ax.xaxis.set_major_locator(mticker.LogLocator(numticks=999))
ax.xaxis.set_minor_locator(mticker.LogLocator(numticks=999, subs=(.2, .4, .6, .8)))

enter image description here

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