3
setwd("D:/Santander")

## import train dataset
train<-read.csv("train.csv",header=T)


dim(train)

summary(train)

str(train)

prop.table(table(train2$TARGET))

stats<-function(x){
  length<-length(x)
  nmiss<-sum(is.na(x))
  y<-x[!is.na(x)]
  freq<-as.data.frame(table(y))
  max_freq<-max(freq[,2])/length
  min<-min(y)
  median<-median(y)
  max<-max(y)
  mean<-mean(y)
  freq<-length(unique(y))
  return(c(nmiss=nmiss,min=min,median=median,mean=mean,max=max,freq=freq,max_freq=max_freq))
}


var_stats<-sapply(train,stats)

var_stats_1<-t(var_stats)

###将最大频数类别比例超过0.9999,其它类别小于1/10000的变量全删除

exclude_var<-rownames(var_stats_1)[var_stats_1[,7]>0.9999]

train2<-train[,! colnames(train) %in% c(exclude_var,"ID")]




rm(list=setdiff(ls(),"train2"))

train2<-train2[1:10000,]

write.csv(train2,"example data.csv",row.names = F)

##随机将数据分为训练集与测试集
set.seed(1)
ind<-sample(c(1,2),size=nrow(train2),replace=T,prob=c(0.8,0.2))

train2$TARGET<-factor(train2$TARGET)
train_set<-train2[ind==1,]
test_set<-train2[ind==2,]

rm(train2)
##1\用R randomForest构建预测模型 100棵树
library(randomForest)

memory.limit(4000)

random<-randomForest(TARGET~.,data=train_set,ntree=50)

print(random)

random.importance<-importance(random)

p_train<-predict(random,train_set,type="prob")

pred.auc<-prediction(p_train[,2],train_set$TARGET)

performance(pred.auc,"auc")

##train_set auc=0.8177


## predict test_set
p_test<-predict(random,newdata = test_set,type="prob")

pred.auc<-prediction(p_test[,2],test_set$TARGET)
performance(pred.auc,"auc")

##test_set auc=0.60


#________________________________________________#

##_________h2o.randomForest_______________

library(h2o)
h2o.init()

train.h2o<-as.h2o(train_set)
test.h2o<-as.h2o(test_set)

random.h2o<-h2o.randomForest(,"TARGET",training_frame = train.h2o,ntrees=50)


importance.h2o<-h2o.varimp(random.h2o)

p_train.h2o<-as.data.frame(h2o.predict(random.h2o,train.h2o))

pred.auc<-prediction(p_train.h2o$p1,train_set$TARGET)

performance(pred.auc,"auc")

##auc=0.9388, bigger than previous one

###test_set prediction

p_test.h2o<-as.data.frame(h2o.predict(random.h2o,test.h2o))

pred.auc<-prediction(p_test.h2o$p1,test_set$TARGET)

performance(pred.auc,"auc")

###auc=0.775

I tried to make predictions with Kaggle competitions: Santander customer satisfaction: https://www.kaggle.com/c/santander-customer-satisfaction When i use randomForest package in R, i got final result in test data of AUC=0.57, but when i use h2o.randomForest, i got final result in test data of AUC=0.81.the parameters in both function are same, i only used the default parameters with ntree=100. So why h2o.randomForest make much better predictions than randomForest package itself?

  • Different algorithm, or different (hyper-)parametrization of the same algorithm? For example, how do R and H2O RF models compare in terms of size - the H2O RF model object probably contains three times as many nodes as the R RF model. – user1808924 May 21 '17 at 9:23
6

Firstly, as user1808924 noted, there are differences in the algorithms and their default hyperparameters. For example, R's randomForest splits based on the Gini criterion and H2O trees are split based on reduction in Squared Error (even for classification). H2O also uses histograms for splitting and can handle splitting on categorical variables without dummy (or one-hot) encoding (although I don't think that matters here since the Santander dataset is entirely numeric). Other information on H2O's splitting can be found here (this is in the GBM section but the splitting for both algos is the same).

If you look at the predictions from your R randomForest model you will see that they are all in increments of 0.02. R's randomForest builds really deep trees, resulting in pure leaf nodes. This means the predicted outcome or an observation is either going to be 0 or 1 in each tree, and since you've set ntrees=50 the predictions will all be in increments of 0.02. The reason you get bad AUC scores is because with AUC it is the order of the predictions that matters, and since all of your predictions are [0.00, 0.02, 0.04, ...] there are a lot of ties. The trees in H2O's random forest aren't quite as deep and therefore aren't as pure, allowing for predictions that have some more granularity to them and that can be better sorted for a better AUC score.

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