2

I have a method that does some work in a transaction:

public async Task<int> AddAsync(Item item)
{
    int result;

    using (var transaction = await _context.Database.BeginTransactionAsync())
    {
        _context.Add(item);

        // Save the item so it has an ItemId
        result = await _context.SaveChangesAsync();

        // perform some actions using that new item's ItemId
        _otherRepository.Execute(item.ItemId);

        transaction.Commit();
    }

    return result;
}

I'd like to add unit tests to check that if _context.SaveChangesAsync or _otherRepository.Execute fail then the transaction is rolled back, is that possible?

I can't see a way to do that using InMemory or SQLite?

2

You could check EF Core logs for a RelationalEventId.RollingbackTransaction event type. I provided full details here:

How to trace an Entity Framework Core event for integration testing?

How it could look:

Assert.True(eventList.Contains((int)RelationalEventId.CommittingTransaction));
3
  • That's great, many thanks. It's worth knowing this only works with Sqlite, not with InMemory and its also worth noting that you should clear the event log just before the action part of the unit test to ensure any setup code didn't add the event you're testing for. – tomRedox May 23 '17 at 17:54
  • @tomRedox thanks. Probably this doesn't work with InMemory because it isn't a pure relational db. Could InMemory just use a different set of Event Ids? – Ilya Chumakov May 24 '17 at 7:34
  • I had a look into this in a bit more detail, I've added what I found as a separate answer as it surprised me and I thought others might find it useful. – tomRedox May 24 '17 at 11:36
4

@Ilya Chumakov's excellent answer allowed me to unit test for the transaction. Our discussion in the comments then exposed some interesting points that I thought were worth moving into an answer so they'd be more permanent and easier to see:

The primary point is that the events logged by Entity Framework change dependent on the database provider, which surprised me. If using the InMemory provider you get just one event:

  1. Id:1; ExecutedCommand

Whereas if you use Sqlite for the in-memory database you get four events:

  1. Id:1; ExecutedCommand
  2. Id:5; BeginningTransaction
  3. Id:1; ExecutedCommand
  4. Id:6; CommittingTransaction

I hadn't expected the events logged to change depending on the DB provider.

To anyone wanting to look into this more, I captured the event details by changing Ilya's logging code as follows:

    public class FakeLogger : ILogger
    {
        public void Log<TState>(LogLevel logLevel, EventId eventId, TState state, Exception exception,
            Func<TState, Exception, string> formatter)
        {
            var record = new LogRecord
            {
                EventId = eventId.Id,
                RelationalEventId = (RelationalEventId) eventId.Id,
                Description = formatter(state, exception)
            };

            Events.Add(record);

        }

        public List<LogRecord> Events { get; set; } = new List<LogRecord>();

        public bool IsEnabled(LogLevel logLevel) => true;

        public IDisposable BeginScope<TState>(TState state) => null;   
    }

    public class LogRecord
    {
        public EventId EventId { get; set; }
        public RelationalEventId RelationalEventId { get; set; }
        public string Description { get; set; }
    }

And then I adjusted my code that returns an in-memory database so that I could switch in-memory DB provider as follows:

    public class InMemoryDatabase
    {
        public FakeLogger EfLogger { get; private set; }

        public MyDbContext GetContextWithData(bool useSqlite = false)
        {
            EfLogger = new FakeLogger();

            var factoryMock = Substitute.For<ILoggerFactory>();
            factoryMock.CreateLogger(Arg.Any<string>()).Returns(EfLogger);

            DbContextOptions<MyDbContext> options;

            if (useSqlite)
            {
                // In-memory database only exists while the connection is open
                var connection = new SqliteConnection("DataSource=:memory:");
                connection.Open();

                options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<MyDbContext>()
                    .UseSqlite(connection)
                    .UseLoggerFactory(factoryMock)
                    .Options;
            }
            else
            {
                options = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<MyDbContext>()
                    .UseInMemoryDatabase(Guid.NewGuid().ToString())
                    // don't raise the error warning us that the in memory db doesn't support transactions
                    .ConfigureWarnings(x => x.Ignore(InMemoryEventId.TransactionIgnoredWarning))
                    .UseLoggerFactory(factoryMock)
                    .Options;
            }

            var ctx = new MyDbContext(options);

            if (useSqlite)
            {
                ctx.Database.EnsureCreated();                
            }

            // code to populate the context with test data

            ctx.SaveChanges();

            return ctx;
        }
    }

Finally, in my unit test I made sure to clear the event log just before the assert part of my test to ensure I don't get a false positive due to events that were logged during the arrange part of my test:

        public async Task Commits_transaction()
        {
            using (var context = _inMemoryDatabase.GetContextWithData(useSqlite: true))
            {

                // Arrange
                // code to set up date for test

                // make sure none of our setup added the event we are testing for
                _inMemoryDatabase.EfLogger.Events.Clear();

                // Act
                // Call the method that has the transaction;

                // Assert
                var result = _inMemoryDatabase.EfLogger.Events
                    .Any(x => x.EventId.Id == (int) RelationalEventId.CommittingTransaction);
0

I think you are asking about how to rollback when a commit fails, EF core will auto rollback on if any of the statement failed Read more here , if you are asking for other reason or you want to do something when rollback happens, just to add try catch blocks,

    using (var transaction = await 
        _context.Database.BeginTransactionAsync()){
   try { 
                    _context.Add(item);

        // Save the item so it has an ItemId
        result = await _context.SaveChangesAsync();

        // perform some actions using that new item's ItemId
        _otherRepository.Execute(item.ItemId);

        transaction.Commit();
                } 
                catch (Exception) 
                { 
                // failed, Do something 
                } }
4
  • Hey thanks for your reply, but as per the title and question text I'm asking how to unit test transaction behaviour – tomRedox May 20 '17 at 18:14
  • oh sorry, then you mean something like sql profiler ? – Munzer May 20 '17 at 18:26
  • With the ef core in-memory database you can configure it not to raise transaction warnings, which means it knows when a transaction has been attempted. I was hoping that there might be some property of the in-memory db that can be interrogated to determine if the transaction would have been committed. Or similarly, that SQLite might have that sort of feature. Effectively something like asking whether a method has been called in a mocking framework. – tomRedox May 20 '17 at 18:32
  • I am sorry I can't help, I will ask my coworkers and if they know I will try to help. – Munzer May 20 '17 at 18:40

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