1

Using DuckTyping approach, below are two classes Duck & Person,

class Duck:
   def quack(self):
       print('Quack')

   def fly(self):
       print('Flap')

class Person:
   def quack(self):
       print('I\'m quacking like a duck')

   def walk(self):
       print('Walk')

def quackFlap(creature):
    try: 
       creature.quack()
    except: # EAFP
       print('Cannot quack')

    try:
       creature.flap() # Using hasattr() will violate EAFP
    except: # EAFP
       print('Cannot flap') 

donald = Duck()
quackFlap(donald)

p = Person()
quackFlap(p)  # Duck Typing approach says, Person is not Duck.

Using class based inheritance approach, below are two classes Bird & Duck,

class Bird(object):
   def quack(self):
       print('Quack')

   def fly(self):
       print('Fly')

class Duck(Bird):
   def quack(self):
       print('I\'m quacking like a duck')
   def fly(self):
       print('Flap')

def quackFlap(creature):
    if isinstance(creature, Bird):
       creature.quack()
       creature.flap()

b = Bird()
quackFlap(b)

d = Duck()
quackFlap(d) # Inheritance allowed isinstance() check - Error handling

Question:

1) Does DuckTyping avoid Subclassing? because on subclassing, we do not see the necessity of DuckTyping approach

2) When DuckTyping is better than class based inheritance?

  • That's a really bad use of try/catch. A missing method is almost certainly going to raise AttributeError, but there are a lot of cases where a method could raise AttributeError itself. So I'd actually use hasattr rather than try/catch, and even if I were using try/except, I'd be careful to only handle AttributeError – Sam Hartman May 21 '17 at 13:23
  • I'm trying to articulate why I think this is a bad question. Partially it's that it's opinion based; partially it is not clear to me you have a good enough starting place. I think if you were to focus on something like what are the tradeoffs between duck typing and subclassing, it would be a more clear question. I tried to answer that, but found it was too broad for me to come up with something useful. – Sam Hartman May 21 '17 at 13:26
  • 1
    @SamHartman If you use hasattr() then weren't you violating EAFP? using hasattr() will be like taking the permission before using it. sn't it? – overexchange May 21 '17 at 13:28
  • Yeah, I'm saying that EAFP produces fragile code in this case, and it's a bad approach. It's a tool, not a religion; sometimes it works well, sometimes it does not. – Sam Hartman May 21 '17 at 13:30
  • 1
    I didn't get the point of downvoting the OP. Even if the code has issues, the question is still valid. Which rule did he break? – Danilo M. Oliveira May 21 '17 at 13:46
6

1) Does DuckTyping avoid Subclassing? because on subclassing, we do not the necessity of DuckTyping approach

Not at all. Duck typing only turns unnecessary doing casts/checkings to the subclass type when you need to access something that is not defined on the superclass. But with a good design and a proper use of polymorphism you avoid doing this (using instanceof + cast to access the particularity of a subclass).

2) When DuckTyping is better than class based inheritance?

It really depends... Inheritance should be avoided when there is no "IS A" relationship between the classes, mainly when it's used just as a mean to re-utilize code. When there is an "IS A" relationship, and the code relies on the use of "instanceof", it's a sign of a bad design, i.e., that polymorphism isn't being properly used.

Duck typing is a handy way to have a polymorphic code without relying on abstract classes/interfaces like Java, for instance. But an abstract class/interface defines a contract. With duck typing you can introduce subtle bugs in your code due this lack of formal relationship. If your "quack" isn't a "quack" at all, you'll be in trouble. With inheritance, this is less likely to happen due the contractual nature of subclassing abstract classes.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Answer to first part was not clear. I did not get this Duck typing only turns unnecessary doing casts/checkings to the subclass type when you need to access something that is not defined on the superclass – overexchange May 21 '17 at 22:00
  • 2
    In a static typed language, calling a method undefined on the base class will not compile. So, without ducktyping, if you need to call anything that is not defined in the base class, you need to make a cast to the subclass, and use the instanceof operator to avoid a invalid cast raising an error. – Danilo M. Oliveira May 22 '17 at 6:45
  • Duck typing is used extensively in Python sklearn. This really helps extend its functionality. Users can build their custom algorithms using sklearn API to interface with sklearn. – Sarah Oct 26 '19 at 22:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.