I am trying to implement a DST for probablistic programming inspired by Jared Tobin blog post.

A free monad for a DST including the bernoulli and beta distribution could look like this:

data ModelF r =
    BernoulliF Double (Bool -> r)
  | BetaF Double Double (Double -> r)
  deriving (Functor)

type Model = Free ModelF

bernoulli :: Double -> Model Bool
bernoulli p = liftF (BernoulliF p id)

beta :: Double -> Double -> Model Double
beta a b = liftF (BetaF a b id)

I would like to extend it to support observation on distributions. That is: force a specific return value.

First attempt was to extend the functor:

data ModelF r =
    BernoulliF Double (Bool -> r)
  | BetaF Double Double (Double -> r)
  | ObsF (ModelF r) r
  deriving (Functor)

This is problematic however since it allows for a recursive nesting of ObsF.

One solution would be to lift the free monad into another free monad representing an observed value:

data ObsModelF r =
    PureF (Model r)
  | ObsF (Model r) r
  deriving (Functor)

observe :: Model r -> r -> Free ObsModelF r
observe model o = liftF (ObsF model o)

The syntax I am after though is:

let dist = do
      p <- beta 1 1
      observe (bernoulli p) True

This is incompatible with ObsModelF since beta 1 1 should also be lifted into ObsModelF. This requires two separate constructors: one for distributions without an observation and one with an observation. Is it possible to avoid that complexity in the DST?


A third attempt. This time I wrap the distribution functor (ModelF) in the observation functor that I then lift (ObsModelF). I get some type errors I do not quite understand though (see the comments):

data ModelF r =
    BernoulliF Double (Bool -> r)
  | BetaF Double Double (Double -> r)
  deriving (Functor)

data ObsModelF r =
    PureF (ModelF r)
  | ObsF (ModelF r) r
  deriving (Functor)

type ObsModel = Free ObsModelF

bernoulli :: Double -> ObsModel Bool
bernoulli p = liftF . PureF $ BernoulliF p id

beta :: Double -> Double -> ObsModel Double
beta a b = liftF . PureF $ BetaF a b id

observe :: ObsModel r -> r -> ObsModel r
observe f o = liftF $ case f of
           (Free f') -> case f' of
               (PureF f'') ->  ObsF f'' o   -----| Couldn't match expected type ‘Free ObsModelF r’
               (ObsF f'' o') ->  ObsF f'' o    --| with actual type ‘r’

toSampler :: (RandomGen g) => ObsModel r -> State g r
toSampler = iterM $ \case
  ObsF a o -> case a of 
    BernoulliF p f -> return o >>= f  -----| Couldn't match type ‘StateT g Data.Functor.Identity.Identity r’
    BetaF a b f    -> return o >>= f     --| with ‘Bool’
  PureF a -> case a of 
    BernoulliF p f -> MWC.bernoulli p >>= f
    BetaF a b f    -> MWC.beta a b >>= f

I have included a very simple interpreter (toSampler). Currently it ignores the distribution completely and just flatmaps the observation value. Please note that this is not the intended behaviour when conditioning on a distribution. It is only provided to show how the interpreter would traverse the free structure.

  • I'm unsure about the semantics you expect from the ObsModelF type. Could you write an interpreter to clarify? Also, what is wrong with wrapping beta 1 1 using PureF or a lift-like function? – Li-yao Xia May 22 '17 at 19:23
  • I would like to observe an arbitrary distribution. If I lifted all distribution with Pure (both bernoulli and beta) I would have to unwrap bernoulli to lift it with ObsF again. It seems like a lot of operations for a simpel task. What I want to achieve is fixing a ModelF r return value by "labeling" it as observed. I can try and elaborate more in the question body.. – tmpethick May 22 '17 at 20:01
  • 1
    From reading the blog post and a few more materials I have some idea of what it means to observe but I can't reconcile that with your type at the moment, hence why I asked to have an interpreter to look at. Furthermore, wrapping/unwrapping can usually be hidden pretty easily from the language user, but it's easier to figure out an appropriate way to clean up the API if there is a working implementation first. – Li-yao Xia May 22 '17 at 20:38
  • @Li-yaoXia I have updated the answer with a third attempt that includes an interpreter. I would really appreciate it if you could take a look and help me understand what is wrong. – tmpethick May 26 '17 at 11:51
  • 1
    You can use ObsF !(ModelF r) r if you want to make sure it doesn't nest indefinitely. – PyRulez Dec 3 '17 at 0:57

I'm familiar with something similar in other languages/DSLs. I'm not sure the thing I have in mind is exactly what you're after, but I'll give a rough sketch of the idea. Maybe you'll find it helpful.

The observe I'm familiar with has a type something like Distribution a -> a -> Model (), and it is interpreted as multiplying the probability of the current path through the model by the probability(/density) of the observation under the distribution. This observe takes a Distribution, rather than a Model, as we need a way to compute the probability(/density) of the observation.

Once you have a Distribution type, you can also replace the per distribution operations with a single operation for introducing uncertainty. This would take a Distribution as argument.

I have a Haskell DSL that works in pretty much this way here. The only difference is that observe is implemented in terms of a simpler operation called weight, which arbitrarily modifies the log probability of the current path.

BTW, this approach is lifted in its entirety from the WebPPL language.

  • Looks like a really nice port – I'll definitely have a closer look. You should also check out github.com/adscib/monad-bayes if you haven't already. There seem to be a few similarities. It also looks like they have started adding single-site MH which was not part of the original paper. My interpreter will eventually map it to a single-site MH so an observation should fix the logPdf and sample for a given distribution. I'm struggling to understand how this can be modelled as a free monad though – would you stack the free monad? – tmpethick May 25 '17 at 20:33

Here is a suggestion

data ModelF r =
    BernoulliF Double (Bool -> r)
  | BetaF Double Double (Double -> r)
  | ObsFail
  deriving (Functor)

Then you can do

let dist = do
      p <- beta 1 1
      b <- bernoulli p
      if (b==True)
          then return ()
          else ObsFail

In general, we can define

observe dist r = do
    r' <- dist
    if r == r'
        then return ()
        else ObsFail

To sample, we sample like normal, except we re-sample it each time we get ObsFail.

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