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In the following project, the necessary parameters to initialize test.c are arranged in the structure DataStructure (Here I have only a pointer U8* Buffer). During init, the pointer Buffer is initialized (is pointed to an array) and the function test_init passes the initData to test.c. In test.c the content of the array is printed.
main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "test.h"

void init(DataStructure *pSL);
void main(void);

void main(void) {
      DataStructure initData[COUNT];
      init(&initData[0]);
      test_init(&initData[0]);

      test_run();

}
void init(DataStructure *pSL)
{
  U8 Buffer[8] =  {0xF1 , 0xF2 , 0xF3 , 0xF4 , 0xF5 , 0xF6 , 0xF7 , 0xF8};

  DataStructure SL;
  U8* pC = &Buffer[0];
  SL.Buffer = pC;

  *pSL = SL;

}

where test.c and test.h are:

#ifndef TEST_H_
#define TEST_H_

#ifndef U8
typedef unsigned char U8;
#endif

typedef struct{
  U8 *Buffer;
} DataStructure;

#define COUNT  1

void test_init (DataStructure *List);
void test_run ();
#endif /* TEST_H_ */

and

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "test.h"

static DataStructure *pD;

void test_init (DataStructure *_pD)
{
    pD = _pD;
    printf("\n test_init: ");
    for(int i=0;i<8;i++)
        printf("0x%0x, ",*(pD->Buffer+i));
}
void test_run (void)
{
      printf("\n test_run: ");
      for(int i=0;i<8;i++)
          printf("0x%0x, ",*(pD->Buffer+i));
}

The output of this code is:

test_init: 0x0, 0x0, 0x0, 0x0, 0xf5, 0xf6, 0xf7, 0xf8, 
test_run: 0x0, 0x0, 0x0, 0x0, 0xf5, 0xf6, 0xf7, 0xf8, 

which is wrong. But if I print the elements of SL.Buffer within init function as well, i.e if I change the init function as follows:

void init(DataStructure *pSL)
{
  U8 Buffer[8] =  {0xF1 , 0xF2 , 0xF3 , 0xF4 , 0xF5 , 0xF6 , 0xF7 , 0xF8};

  DataStructure SL;
  U8* pC = &Buffer[0];
  SL.Buffer = pC;

  *pSL = SL;


  printf("\n main: ");
  for(int i=0;i<8;i++)
    printf("0x%0x, ",*(SL.Buffer+i));

}

, the array is passed correctly:

main: 0xf1, 0xf2, 0xf3, 0xf4, 0xf5, 0xf6, 0xf7, 0xf8, 
test_init: 0xf1, 0xf2, 0xf3, 0xf4, 0xf5, 0xf6, 0xf7, 0xf8, 
test_run: 0xf1, 0xf2, 0xf3, 0xf4, 0xf5, 0xf6, 0xf7, 0xf8, 

Could anybody explain me whats wrong whit this code and why the problem is fixed just by printing the array in init function?
And is it the right way to initialize and pass a structure containing a pointer?
The code is a simple version of my project. Originaly the DataStructure contains more parameters and the parameter COUNT (size of initData is more than one.

3
  • 2
    Seems like a classical case of assigning the address of a temporary variable (Buffer) to a pointer, than using that pointer after the temporary variable goes out of scope (when the init() function exits)? – stijn May 22 '17 at 10:03
  • Correct, if I define the array outside init it works, but why I got the correct result when I print the array in init as well – Behy May 22 '17 at 10:06
  • 1
    You're invoking undefined behavior, which basically means anything can happen. Including seemingly correct results because the stack isn't trashed yet after retruning from init() – stijn May 22 '17 at 10:11
2

The problem, as I see it is with the usage of Buffer array.

It is local to the init() function, yet you return the address of the first element of the array to be used outside the function, where the array does not exist anymore. Hence, the address is essentially invalid and any attempt to access that memory will cause undefined behavior.

In the second case, it works fine, as you're printing the array before it ceases it's lifetime, so you're getting expected result.

Solution: You need to allocate static storage to the Buffer array, or use memory allocator function so as, the lifetime of the memory supersede the function scope.

2
  • The solution is correct, but I am not satisfied with your reason: why in the first case the last part of array is printed correctly? if it is local, hte entire part should be hidden. Moreover, in the second case, the second print (which is in test_init is after finishing the lifetime of this Buffer – Behy May 22 '17 at 10:09
  • @Behy 1) undefined behavior 2) undefined behavior – Sourav Ghosh May 22 '17 at 12:57

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