40

Code speaks a million words:

php > echo strtotime("2010-12-07T23:00:00.000Z");
1291762800
echo date('c', 1291762800);
2010-12-08T00:00:00+01:00
php > var_dump(DateTime::createFromFormat('c', "2010-12-07T23:00:00.000Z"));
bool(false)
php > var_dump(DateTime::createFromFormat(DateTime::ISO8601, "2010-12-07T23:00:00.000Z"));
bool(false)

Any idea what's going on?

Btw, yes, new DateTime("2010-12-07T23:00:00.000Z") works fine. But I prefer to know what input I am getting.

  • 3
    Your fractional seconds aren't part of the format. DateTime::ISO8601 is a string with the value Y-m-d\TH:i:sO. – salathe Dec 10 '10 at 17:53
  • 4
    WikiPedia disagrees: Decimal fractions may also be added to any of the three time elements. A decimal point, either a comma or a dot (without any preference as stated most recently in resolution 10 of the 22nd General Conference CGPM in 2003), is used as a separator between the time element and its fraction. A fraction may only be added to the lowest order time element in the representation. – Jake Dec 10 '10 at 18:07
  • public static DateTime DateTime::createFromFormat ( string $format , string $time [, DateTimeZone $timezone ] ), maybe is caused by inclusive of the timezone – ajreal Dec 10 '10 at 18:11
  • 2
    Seems like "c" and DateTime::ISO8601 aren't the same either: php > var_dump(DateTime::createFromFormat('c', "2010-12-10T19:02:09+01:00")); bool(false) php > var_dump(DateTime::createFromFormat('c', '2010-12-10T19:02:09+01:00')); bool(false) php > var_dump(DateTime::createFromFormat(DateTime::ISO8601, '2010-12-10T19:02:09+01:00')); object(DateTime)#26 (3) { ["date"]=> string(19) "2010-12-10 19:02:09" ["timezone_type"]=> int(1) ["timezone"]=> string(6) "+01:00" } – Jake Dec 10 '10 at 18:20

11 Answers 11

39

There's a bug report that exactly describes your problem :)

https://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=51950

Since 2016-08-07, the bug report has been marked as "not a bug". You need to use strtotime or new DateTime instead.

The constants that have been defined apply to both formatting and parsing in the same way, which forces your ways.

  • 4
    Indeed disappointing. Why name a constant "ISO8601" if it's not actually compliant to that standard. This is why I don't like PHP much. – jlh Oct 18 '16 at 8:30
  • 2
    Bloody 7 years later and this still exists.... and is even marked as not a bug? If you want to accept different ISO-8601 date/time formats. Different ISO-8601 formats?? Why I dislike php in a nutshell. – Douglas Gaskell Sep 2 '17 at 21:45
  • 1
    Feeling the pain too – Michael Ambrose Jan 29 '18 at 23:36
13

Parsing ISO8601 date, and also switching timezone:

// create ISO8601 dateTime 
$date = DateTime::createFromFormat(DateTime::ISO8601, '2016-07-27T19:30:00Z');

// set to user's timezone
$date -> setTimeZone('Asia/Singapore');

echo $date -> format(DateTime::ISO8601);
// prints '2016-07-28T03:30:00+0800'
  • copied your code and it prints: "2016-07-27T19:30:00+0000" using PHP 5.6.10 – Alex Angelico Apr 20 '17 at 22:02
  • @AlexAngelico What is the output for echo DateTime::ISO8601;? It prints Y-m-d\TH:i:sO for me. – a20 Apr 21 '17 at 6:36
  • yes, DateTime::ISO8601 prints Y-m-d\TH:i:sO I'm using this code to change the time to the correct Timezone. I'm in GMT-5 $fecha_str = '2017-04-12T21:43:54+02:00'; $date = strtotime($fecha_str); echo date("Y-m-d h:i:s", $date); /output=> 2017-04-12 07:43:54 – Alex Angelico Apr 21 '17 at 15:29
  • Just as a heads up, don't use format(\DateTime::ISO8601) because it is not a valid ISO8601 format. Instead use either c, \DateTime::ATOM or DATE_ATOM. The reason is because the \DateTime:ISO8601 way would wrongly stores as 2005-08-15T15:52:01+0000 when in actuality a valid ISO8601 date string should have a colon between the time zone designator like 2005-08-15T15:52:01+00:00. This is mentioned in the PHP docs but is not immediately clear. Read the docs here: ca3.php.net/manual/en/… – Puiu Nov 30 '17 at 18:49
8

Nobody mentioned to use DATE_ATOM which is as far as i know phps most correct implementation of ISO 8601. It should at least work for the last 3 of these:

<?php

$dates = array(
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00.000Z",
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00",
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00Z",
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00+01:00",
    (new \DateTime("now"))->format(DATE_ATOM)
);

foreach($dates as $d) {

    $res = \DateTime::createFromFormat(DATE_ATOM, $d);

    echo "try $d: \n";
    var_dump($res);
    echo "\n\n";
}

?>

To be able to parse all of them i wrote a tiny function:

<?php

function parse_iso_8601($iso_8601_string) {
    $results = array();
    $results[] = \DateTime::createFromFormat("Y-m-d\TH:i:s",$iso_8601_string);
    $results[] = \DateTime::createFromFormat("Y-m-d\TH:i:s.u",$iso_8601_string);
    $results[] = \DateTime::createFromFormat("Y-m-d\TH:i:s.uP",$iso_8601_string);
    $results[] = \DateTime::createFromFormat("Y-m-d\TH:i:sP",$iso_8601_string);
    $results[] = \DateTime::createFromFormat(DATE_ATOM,$iso_8601_string);

    $success = array_values(array_filter($results));
    if(count($success) > 0) {
        return $success[0];
    }
    return false;
}

// Test
$dates = array(
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00.000Z",
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00",
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00Z",
    "2010-12-07T23:00:00+01:00",
    (new \DateTime("now"))->format(DATE_ATOM)
);

foreach($dates as $d) {

    $res = parse_iso_8601($d);

    echo "try $d: \n";
    var_dump($res);
    echo "\n\n";
}

?>

As @Glutexo mentioned it works only if there are only 1 to 6 precision digits for the decimal part, too. Feel free to improve it.

  • You’re the man! I was googling something like "php parse all rfc 8601 formats" and accidentally found your solution. It very helped me. – Serhii Popov Dec 9 '18 at 19:14
6

try this:

DateTime::createFromFormat('Y-m-d\TH:i:sP', $date)
2

It is very strange and disappointing that this bug is still actual. Here is a right pattern for parsing date with microseconds in decimal part of seconds:

Y-m-d\TH:i:s.uO

Usage:

$dateStr = '2015-04-29T11:42:56.000+0400'
$ISO = 'Y-m-d\TH:i:s.uO'
$date = DateTime::createFromFormat($ISO, $dateStr)
  • 1
    Actually, this work only if the decimal part of the seconds is present. Moreover, it works only if there are only 1 to 6 precision digits. If the decimal part is omitted or if it is more precise, false is returned. – Glutexo Dec 2 '15 at 13:51
2

For the answer listed here https://stackoverflow.com/a/14849503/2425651 we can use this format "Y-m-d\TH: i: s.u+" to keep the microseconds.

$format = 'Y-m-d\TH:i:s.u+';
$value = '2017-09-21T10:11:19.026Z'; // jsDate.toUTCString();
var_dump(\DateTime::createFromFormat($format, $value));
2

Simply :

$dt = new DateTime('2018-04-07T16:32:44Z');
$dt->format('Ymd'); // 20180407
2

Use DATE_ATOM rather than 'c' when formatting like @Steven said. This is how you work with ISO 8601 in PHP.

<?php
$now_date = new DateTime();
$now_iso_8601 = $now_date->format(DATE_ATOM);
echo "Now in ISO 8601 format: {$now_iso_8601}\n";
$date_from_string_and_format = date_create_from_format(DATE_ATOM, $now_iso_8601);
echo "ISO 8601 formatted string, back to DateTime object:\n";
var_dump($date_from_string_and_format);

prints

Now in ISO 8601 format: 2018-09-05T08:17:35-10:00
ISO 8601 formatted string, back to DateTime object:
object(DateTime)#2 (3) {
  ["date"]=>
  string(26) "2018-09-05 08:17:35.000000"
  ["timezone_type"]=>
  int(1)
  ["timezone"]=>
  string(6) "-10:00"
}
0

This one works for me:

$date = (new DateTime)->setTimestamp(strtotime('2017-12-31T23:00:00.000Z'));
0

I am using follow function that allow multiple ISO8601 formats:

function fromISO8601($time, \DateTimeZone $timezone = null) {
    // valid ISO time 2019-04-01T00:00:00.000+02:00
    $t = \DateTime::createFromFormat('Y-m-d\TH:i:s.uO', $time) or
    // ISO time without millis 2019-04-01T00:00:00+02:00
    $t = \DateTime::createFromFormat('Y-m-d\TH:i:sO', $time) or
    // ISO time without timezone 2019-04-01T00:00:00.000
    $t = \DateTime::createFromFormat('Y-m-d\TH:i:s.u', $time, $timezone) or
    // ISO time without millis and timezone 2019-04-01T00:00:00.000+02:00
    $t = \DateTime::createFromFormat('Y-m-d\TH:i:s', $time, $timezone);

    return $t;
}

here are all supported dates

var_dump(
    fromISO8601('2019-04-01T00:00:00.000+02:00'),
    fromISO8601('2019-04-01T00:00:00+02:00'),
    fromISO8601('2019-04-01T00:00:00.000'),
    fromISO8601('2019-04-01T00:00:00')
);

This code is benevolent for missing timezone and milliseconds and works in older php versions.

0

I've experienced this issue with POSTGRES default Time with timezone format and this was the format that fixed it for me:

Y-m-d H:i:s.uO

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