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In Perl, named capture groups can be used to extract data from a string using a regex:

perl -wle '
    use Data::Dumper;
    "abc" =~ / (?<B> (?<A> a ) b ) c /x and print "match!";
    print Dumper(\%+);
'

prints

match!                                                                                                                            
$VAR1 = {                                                                                                                         
      'B' => 'ab',                                                                                                            
      'A' => 'a'                                                                                                              
    };                                                                                                                        

But how do you get the position of the matches A and B in the string "abc"? When using unnamed capture groups, one can refer to the regex variables @- and @+, but this does not work for named groups (*).

(*) With 'does not work' I mean that I cannot use the name of the capture group to retrieve the position, but only the number of the group (e.g. $-[1] for the start position of group A, but not something like $START_POS{A}). This redicules the use of named capture groups, and may not even be possible if one does not know the order of the capture groups in advance.

  • "This redicules the use of named capture groups"... What does that even mean? – Sinan Ünür May 22 '17 at 14:00
  • One of the reasons of using named capture groups is to avoid using numbers to refer to them. Writing $+{header} and $+{age} makes your code readable, while $+[42] might be anything. If now I have to use the number of the capture group to retrieve the match position, what remains of this advantage? – Felix May 22 '17 at 14:11
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one can refer to the regex variables @- and @+, but this does not work for named groups.

Let's first establish that @+ and @- work as intended:

perl -wle '
    use Data::Dumper;
    "abc" =~ / (?<B> (?<A> a ) b ) c /x and print "match!";
    print Dumper(\@+);'
match!
$VAR1 = [
          3,
          2,
          1
        ];

and

perl -wle '
    use Data::Dumper;
    "abc" =~ / (?<B> (?<A> a ) b ) c /x and print "match!";
    print Dumper(\@-);'
match!
$VAR1 = [
          0,
          0,
          0
        ];

Now, since I posted the above, you have expanded on your question by saying

(*) With 'does not work' I mean that I cannot use the name of the capture group to retrieve the position, but only the number of the group (e.g. $-[1] for the start position of group A, but not something like $START_POS{A}). This redicules the use of named capture groups, and may not even be possible if one does not know the order of the capture groups in advance. (emphasis mine)

I don't quite understand what you mean or why you need this, but my repeated queries remained unanswered, so here is the answer to your literal question.

Looking at perldoc perlvar, we note that currently there is no mechanism to have another hash which allows you to look up match positions by names of capture groups.

%LAST_PAREN_MATCH %+

Similar to @+, the %+ hash allows access to the named capture buffers, should they exist, in the last successful match in the currently active dynamic scope.

For example, $+{foo} is equivalent to $1 after the following match:

   'foo' =~ /(?<foo>foo)/;

The keys of the %+ hash list only the names of buffers that have captured (and that are thus associated to defined values).

The underlying behaviour of %+ is provided by the Tie::Hash::NamedCapture module. … This variable was added in Perl v5.10.0. This variable is read-only and dynamically-scoped.

It is actually rather straightforward to build such a lookup table following a match, but as I have mentioned before, I am not sure why you need it and it does not seem like the best solution to any problem I have encountered before. It may not be the most suitable solution to your problem, so it would be better for you to explain what problem you are actually trying to solve.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $str = 'abc';

$str =~ / (?<B> (?<A> a) b) c /x;

my %captured_to_pos = map +(substr($str, $-[$_], $+[$_] - $-[$_]) => [$-[$_], $+[$_]]), 0 .. $#+;

print Dumper $captured_to_pos{$+{$_}} for qw( A B );

Output:

$VAR1 = [
          0,
          1
        ];
$VAR1 = [
          0,
          2
        ];

You have to be more careful if different capture groups can match identical strings, but I see no reason to delve into that without sufficient motivating explanation from you.

  • Okay, maybe I was a bit unclear with the '@- and @+ does not work' part. I could use these arrays to retrieve the position, but this forces me to use numbers again to refer to the capture groups (e.g. $-[1] for capture group A), making the use of named capture groups senseless. I would like to write something like $START_POS{A}, is that possible – Felix May 22 '17 at 13:54
  • 1
    Please explain why you want to do that. It sounds like you have already decided on the solution, but it may not be the most appropriate one. See xyproblem.info – Sinan Ünür May 22 '17 at 14:00
  • I just thought it should be possible, and that it should be a feature in the language, and I have missed it in the documentation. Why would one need this feature? An example: Write a function that is given two strings ($string1, $string2) of equal length and a quoted regexp ($re) containing named capture groups. The function should match $re against $string1, extract for each capture group the position of the match and then extract the text at that position from $string2. Then, construct a hash with keys being the names of the groups, and values being the text from $string2. – Felix May 22 '17 at 14:33
  • Are you assigning homework now, or is this a concrete problem?! See my updated answer. I am done with this. – Sinan Ünür May 22 '17 at 14:40
  • What is your problem? You asked me to explain what I want to do. In fact, I would like to do exactly what I explained in the example two comments above. To do that, I think I have to know what I asked in the original question. If that's not the case, feel free to provide another solution (or just an idea) to the data extraction function described above. – Felix May 22 '17 at 14:50

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