2

This program should render a single triangle, but only a black screen is shown.

I've updated this code to reflect the changes suggested in the answers/comments.

[Ubuntu 16.04, GLFW, GLEW]

#define GLEW_STATIC
#include <GL/glew.h>
#include <GLFW/glfw3.h>

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

    glfwInit();
    // glfwWindowHint(GLFW_CONTEXT_VERSION_MAJOR, 3);
    // glfwWindowHint(GLFW_CONTEXT_VERSION_MINOR, 2);
    // glfwWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_PROFILE, GLFW_OPENGL_CORE_PROFILE);
    // glfwWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_FORWARD_COMPAT, GL_TRUE);
    // glfwWindowHint(GLFW_RESIZABLE, GL_FALSE);

    GLFWwindow *window = glfwCreateWindow(800, 600, "OpenGL Practice", NULL,     NULL);
    glfwMakeContextCurrent(window);

    glewExperimental = GL_TRUE;
    glewInit();

    GLfloat verts[] = {
        +0.0f, +1.0f,
        -1.0f, -1.0f,
        +1.0f, -1.0f
    };

    GLuint vao;
    glGenVertexArrays(1, &vao);
    glBindVertexArray(vao);

    GLuint vbo;
    glGenBuffers(1, &vbo);
    glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, vbo);
    glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(verts), verts, GL_STATIC_DRAW);
    glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);
    glVertexAttribPointer(0, 2, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, 0);

    // glVertexPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, 0);

    // Main loop
    while (!glfwWindowShouldClose(window))
    {
        glfwPollEvents();

        if (glfwGetKey(window, GLFW_KEY_ESCAPE) == GLFW_PRESS)
        {
            glfwSetWindowShouldClose(window, GL_TRUE);
        }

        glClearColor(1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
        glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

        glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);

        glfwSwapBuffers(window);


    }

    glfwTerminate();

    return 0;
}

[Update: Seems that the tutorial this code was based on was using a much older version of openGL, where shaders were not required. This was devilishly difficult to find, for a beginner, as the setup was exactly the same and there were no compilation or runtime errors. I have marked the answer closest to this explanation as correct below.]

8
  • 1
    Off topic but is your width & height values reversed? Shouldn't it be 600 pixels in height by 800 pixels in width? May 22, 2017 at 18:05
  • @FrancisCulger no I don't think so. It depends on what you'd like the screen to look like, though in this case the width of the resulting screen is larger than the height. May 22, 2017 at 18:19
  • Using glVertexAttribPointer() without shaders is technically valid (only for attrib 0 though) but pretty sketchy. Add some shaders or switch back to classic glVertexPointer().
    – genpfault
    May 22, 2017 at 18:22
  • @cfarvin true; but I'm use to wide screen format... just a matter of preference and it threw me off when reading your question. It wouldn't change the behavior of your program only the look of it. May 22, 2017 at 18:27
  • 1
    What is weirdest about your width/height is not that height is bigger than width, but that you use them switched if you compare glfwCreateWindow() and glViewport(). That causes weird aspect ratios.
    – rodrigo
    May 22, 2017 at 19:08

2 Answers 2

4

Even though you created a VBO and VAO and has filled them you aren't using them correctly.

You first need to bind VAO and then bind VBO and then copy data to the buffer and use glVertexAttribPointer() function then unbind both buffers.

Then before rendering bind the VAO again and unbind it after drawing.

You Also Need SHADERS

I don't see any shader in your code.

Here's a working code :

#include <iostream>

// GLEW
#define GLEW_STATIC
#include <GL/glew.h>

// GLFW
#include <GLFW/glfw3.h>


// Function prototypes
void key_callback(GLFWwindow* window, int key, int scancode, int action, int mode);

// Window dimensions
const GLuint WIDTH = 800, HEIGHT = 600;

// Shaders
const GLchar* vertexShaderSource = "#version 330 core\n"
"layout (location = 0) in vec3 position;\n"
"void main()\n"
"{\n"
"gl_Position = vec4(position.x, position.y, position.z, 1.0);\n"
"}\0";
const GLchar* fragmentShaderSource = "#version 330 core\n"
"out vec4 color;\n"
"void main()\n"
"{\n"
"color = vec4(1.0f, 0.5f, 0.2f, 1.0f);\n"
"}\n\0";

// The MAIN function, from here we start the application and run the game loop
int main()
{
// Init GLFW
glfwInit();
// Set all the required options for GLFW
glfwWindowHint(GLFW_CONTEXT_VERSION_MAJOR, 3);
glfwWindowHint(GLFW_CONTEXT_VERSION_MINOR, 3);
glfwWindowHint(GLFW_OPENGL_PROFILE, GLFW_OPENGL_CORE_PROFILE);
glfwWindowHint(GLFW_RESIZABLE, GL_FALSE);

// Create a GLFWwindow object that we can use for GLFW's functions
GLFWwindow* window = glfwCreateWindow(WIDTH, HEIGHT, "LearnOpenGL", nullptr, nullptr);
glfwMakeContextCurrent(window);

// Set the required callback functions
glfwSetKeyCallback(window, key_callback);

// Set this to true so GLEW knows to use a modern approach to retrieving function pointers and extensions
glewExperimental = GL_TRUE;
// Initialize GLEW to setup the OpenGL Function pointers
glewInit();

// Define the viewport dimensions
int width, height;
glfwGetFramebufferSize(window, &width, &height);  
glViewport(0, 0, width, height);


// Build and compile our shader program
// Vertex shader
GLuint vertexShader = glCreateShader(GL_VERTEX_SHADER);
glShaderSource(vertexShader, 1, &vertexShaderSource, NULL);
glCompileShader(vertexShader);
// Check for compile time errors
GLint success;
GLchar infoLog[512];
glGetShaderiv(vertexShader, GL_COMPILE_STATUS, &success);
if (!success)
{
    glGetShaderInfoLog(vertexShader, 512, NULL, infoLog);
    std::cout << "ERROR::SHADER::VERTEX::COMPILATION_FAILED\n" << infoLog << std::endl;
}
// Fragment shader
GLuint fragmentShader = glCreateShader(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER);
glShaderSource(fragmentShader, 1, &fragmentShaderSource, NULL);
glCompileShader(fragmentShader);
// Check for compile time errors
glGetShaderiv(fragmentShader, GL_COMPILE_STATUS, &success);
if (!success)
{
    glGetShaderInfoLog(fragmentShader, 512, NULL, infoLog);
    std::cout << "ERROR::SHADER::FRAGMENT::COMPILATION_FAILED\n" << infoLog << std::endl;
}
// Link shaders
GLuint shaderProgram = glCreateProgram();
glAttachShader(shaderProgram, vertexShader);
glAttachShader(shaderProgram, fragmentShader);
glLinkProgram(shaderProgram);
// Check for linking errors
glGetProgramiv(shaderProgram, GL_LINK_STATUS, &success);
if (!success) {
    glGetProgramInfoLog(shaderProgram, 512, NULL, infoLog);
    std::cout << "ERROR::SHADER::PROGRAM::LINKING_FAILED\n" << infoLog << std::endl;
}
glDeleteShader(vertexShader);
glDeleteShader(fragmentShader);


// Set up vertex data (and buffer(s)) and attribute pointers
GLfloat vertices[] = {
    -0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, // Left  
     0.5f, -0.5f, 0.0f, // Right 
     0.0f,  0.5f, 0.0f  // Top   
};
GLuint VBO, VAO;
glGenVertexArrays(1, &VAO);
glGenBuffers(1, &VBO);
// Bind the Vertex Array Object first, then bind and set vertex buffer(s) and attribute pointer(s).
glBindVertexArray(VAO);

glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, VBO);
glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(vertices), vertices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

glVertexAttribPointer(0, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 3 * sizeof(GLfloat), (GLvoid*)0);
glEnableVertexAttribArray(0);

glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0); // Note that this is allowed, the call to glVertexAttribPointer registered VBO as the currently bound vertex buffer object so afterwards we can safely unbind

glBindVertexArray(0); // Unbind VAO (it's always a good thing to unbind any buffer/array to prevent strange bugs)

// Game loop
while (!glfwWindowShouldClose(window))
{
    // Check if any events have been activiated (key pressed, mouse moved etc.) and call corresponding response functions
    glfwPollEvents();

    // Render
    // Clear the colorbuffer
    glClearColor(0.2f, 0.3f, 0.3f, 1.0f);
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

    // Draw our first triangle
    glUseProgram(shaderProgram);
    glBindVertexArray(VAO);
    glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);
    glBindVertexArray(0);

    // Swap the screen buffers
    glfwSwapBuffers(window);
}
// Properly de-allocate all resources once they've outlived their purpose
glDeleteVertexArrays(1, &VAO);
glDeleteBuffers(1, &VBO);
// Terminate GLFW, clearing any resources allocated by GLFW.
glfwTerminate();
return 0;
}

// Is called whenever a key is pressed/released via GLFW
void key_callback(GLFWwindow* window, int key, int scancode, int action, int mode)
{
if (key == GLFW_KEY_ESCAPE && action == GLFW_PRESS)
    glfwSetWindowShouldClose(window, GL_TRUE);
}

Source : https://learnopengl.com/code_viewer.php?code=getting-started/hellotriangle

I recommend you to learn OpenGL from start. https://learnopengl.com/ is a great place to learn OpenGL.

5
  • Thanks for your response. I do not see any difference in how I've created and bound the VBO and VAO, nor in how I've filled the VBO. Would you mind pointing out how you've done this differently? Also, I have used shaders in other tutorials, with success. What is killing me is that the current tutorial I am using does not use shaders (not yet, not at this stage in the tutorial) and their code is working. The only difference is that they are using Qt for window management and I am using GLFW. I will have to test your code without the shader portion to see if it works. May 23, 2017 at 14:14
  • There's no way a MODERN opengl program can RENDER anything(like triangles) without shaders but older opengl versions(below 3.0) can render without shaders using glBegin(), glVertex3f(), glEnd() etc. The tutorial you are using should be an old OpenGL tutorial or a modern OpenGL tutorial that isn't willing to draw anything at that stage. Please see learnopengl.com. It has explained everything you need to know about and using VBOs and VAOs. If you can't understand that please leave a comment and I will explain. :)
    – IAS0601
    May 24, 2017 at 5:53
  • Can you give me the link to the tutorial you're using?
    – IAS0601
    May 24, 2017 at 6:00
  • At your request, I did start following learnopengl.com yesterday and noted the section in the hello_triangle exercise where the shaders for modern opengl are required, unlike older opengl versions. It must simply be that the tutorial I was following (found here) was using an older version. The explanation of vbo's/vao's were much better explained on learnopengl.com than on open.gl, where i was studying before. Thank you very much for your input! May 24, 2017 at 13:13
  • I'm very happy to see that my answer helped you. :)
    – IAS0601
    May 25, 2017 at 3:19
2

You have Draw -> Clear -> Swap.

Clear before you draw, not after:

while (!glfwWindowShouldClose(window))
{
    glfwPollEvents();
    if (glfwGetKey(window, GLFW_KEY_ESCAPE) == GLFW_PRESS)
    {
        glfwSetWindowShouldClose(window, GL_TRUE);
    }

    glClearColor(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

    glViewport(0, 0, width, height);
    glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);

    glfwSwapBuffers(window);
}
8
  • Thank you! Unfortunately that didn't work either, though I am sure that it was one of the issues buried in there. I also removed the glViewPort() function. I'm at a loss! May 22, 2017 at 18:12
  • @cfarvin Check the winding order of your vertices. CW versus CCW and depending if you have BackfaceCulling turned on or off. May 22, 2017 at 18:28
  • @FrancisCugler hmmmm... I'll have to go research what you mean. I've never heard of BacfaceCulling or CW vs CCW. You may have not seen the question before it was edited by mods - I am a total beginner and have been following a tutorial. I'll check back in after some review on those topics ^ (and thank you). May 22, 2017 at 18:37
  • @cfarvin CW is Clockwise ordering of vertices and CCW is Counter Clockwise ordering of Vertices. Depending if you have Back Face Culling turned on or off and the order in which you label the vertices will determine if the triangle is rendered to the screen. This is more important when you get into 3D Scenes with a Camera. What back face culling is; is when you have a triangle with 3 vertices and you paint the face of that say blue to saving processing time it will only render the front face which is determined by the winding order of the vertices.... May 22, 2017 at 18:41
  • @cfarvin ... continued. So if you have a camera facing in towards the screen and back face culling is turned on and depending on the Handedness of the 3D coordinate system you are using LH or RH along with the winding order, the triangle face that is towards the camera may or may not be drawn. If you implement a camera with motion to move around the triangle then you would see the other side or not. With back face culling turned on it will only paint or render one surface face of the triangle and not the other. May 22, 2017 at 18:44

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