I have the SuperClass Tile extended in many SubClassess such as GroundTile, WallTile, TrapTile etc..
In another Class, lets call it Main, i can use a function that retrieves me all instances of those classes as an array.

Main(){  
  void MyFunctionThatDoesThings(){
    GroundTile[] grounds = FindObjectsOfType<GroundTile>();
    WallTile[] walls = FindObjectsOfType<WallTile>();
    // ... *same code but for other Classes* ...
    Tile[] tiles = FindObjectsOfType<Tile>();
    // ... etc
  }
}

What I need to do is to filter from tiles array the elements that are not already present in the other arrays. Is there a way (or a Linq method) to do this other than Looping through the tiles array, checking if the current element is equal to any element in the other arrays, and if not keep it otherwise delete it?

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're already storing each array in it's own variable as you show above, then you can filter out the other arrays using the Except() extension method (which you get from using System.Linq;).

Then you can just do something like:

GroundTile[] grounds = FindObjectsOfType<GroundTile>();
WallTile[] walls = FindObjectsOfType<WallTile>();
TrapTile[] traps = FindObjectsOfType<TrapTile>();

Tile[] tiles = FindObjectsOfType<Tile>()
    .Except(traps)
    .Except(walls)
    .Except(grounds)
    .ToArray();
  • This is almost the same as @Sir Rufo's answer. And it's even "cleaner" to be read. Thank You. – Damiano Caprari May 22 '17 at 21:59
Tile[] tiles = FindObjectsOfType<Tile>().Except(
    Enumerable.Empty<Tile>()
        .Concat( grounds )
        ...
        .Concat( walls ) ).ToArray();
  • Couldn't you just use grounds.Concat... ? – NetMage May 22 '17 at 21:39
  • this worked perfectly, thank you – Damiano Caprari May 22 '17 at 21:51

This might do as an example if I understood correctly:

            List<int> l = new List<int> { 1, 2, 4 };
            List<int> s = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 };
            var result = s.Where(x => l.Contains(x));

One way to do it is by using LINQ. Assuming you have an ID to identify a particular object.

GroundTile[] grounds = FindObjectsOfType<GroundTile>();
WallTile[] walls = FindObjectsOfType<WallTile>();
// ... *same code but for other Classes* ...
Tile[] tiles = FindObjectsOfType<Tile>();

var existingTiles = grounds.Union(walls);

tiles = tiles.Where(t => existingTiles.All(e => e.ID != t.ID)).ToArray();
  • Why is converting to List needed? – Sir Rufo May 22 '17 at 21:02
  • True. It is not required. Thanks for pointing out. I will update. – Ram's stack May 22 '17 at 21:04
  • You should use All instead of Any – Sir Rufo May 22 '17 at 21:09
  • I understand your logic, and it should work. but i get this error: CS1929: Type 'GroundTile[]' does not contain a member 'Union' and the best extension method overload 'System.Linq.Queryable.Union<WallTile>(this System.Linq.IQueryable<WallTile>, System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<WallTile>)' requires an instance of type 'System.Linq.IQueryable<WallTile>' – Damiano Caprari May 22 '17 at 21:49
  • @DamianoCaprari Did you add using System.Linq? Union is extension method in System.Linq namespace – Ram's stack May 22 '17 at 22:14

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