3

I am following this blogpost by @StephenHaunts here https://stephenhaunts.com/2014/10/10/simple-async-await-example-for-asynchronous-programming/#comments

What is the purpose of last return statement in the code, inside LongRunningOperation.

private static async Task<string> LongRunningOperation()
{
     int counter;    
     for (counter = 0; counter < 50000; counter++)
     {
         Console.WriteLine(counter);
     }    
     return "Counter = " + counter;
}

Now what I know is:

  1. As I am calling this LongrunningOperation inside Task.Run, it should return whatever this awaited method is returning by default. Then Why it is not doing that.

  2. If I use Task.Result property then It'll run behave synchronously and block calling thread, which is not recommended.

What I want to ask is:

  1. How I'll get this returned value printed at calling spot?

  2. And why @Stephen have written that statement when there is no need of it?

Thanks in advance.

1
  • 1
    What do you mean by have written that statement when there is no need of? The return type of that method is async Task<string>, of course you have to return a string or it won't compile. May 23 '17 at 8:46
5

What is the purpose of last return statement in the code, inside LongRunningOperation.

To return the string "Counter = 50000" and demonstrate that the loop has been completed. This is not very useful, but, obviously, this is a toy example. You could declare your method as static async Task instead of static async Task<string> and not return a value.

As I am calling this LongrunningOperation inside Task.Run, it should return whatever this awaited method is returning by default. Then Why it is not doing that.

What makes you think it is not doing that? Does the following snippet not return the expected result?

string s = await Task.Run(() => LongrunningOperation());
// s should now contain "Counter = 50000".

Note: Calling Task.Run without await will return the potentially unfinished task instead of the result.

If I use Task.Result property then It'll run behave synchronously and block calling thread, which is not recommended.

Exactly, which is why you shouldn't do it.

How I'll get this returned value printed at calling spot?

By doing something with the return value. Either by assigning it to a string (as demonstrated above), or by printing it directly:

Console.WriteLine(await Task.Run(() => LongrunningOperation()));

And why @Stephen have written that statement when there is no need of it?

That, you'll have to ask Stephen. :-)

6
  • 3
    Worth to note that, strictly speaking, LongrunningOperation will always run synchronously because is a CPU bound operation, even when wrapped inside Task.Run. The only difference is that in the latter it is executed in another thread (but again synchronously). May 23 '17 at 8:56
  • @FedericoDipuma: That depends on your definition of "(a)synchronous". Some would argue that multi-threading is "asynchronous" by definition, but you are right, it is not "asynchronous" in the usual C# async-await sense.
    – Heinzi
    May 23 '17 at 9:00
  • @FedericoDipuma, Ohh then can you give me a simple console based async.await example which would behave asynchronously by every mean. As according to my understanding above example is asynchronous as it not halting calling thread.
    – Iqra.
    May 23 '17 at 9:06
  • @Heinzi, Really thanks a lot to help me out understanding this.
    – Iqra.
    May 23 '17 at 9:08
  • 2
    @Eqra From C# perspective an async operation is not bound to the CPU. A pure asynchronous action is usually an I/O operation (disk, network, etc.), which does not block any thread while waiting for complete. Stephen better explains this in his blog using Task.Run as an example. If you have further doubts you'll better create another question, this is too broad to be explained in comments. May 23 '17 at 9:22
-1

A symple

private async Task DoSomething()
{
  var counter = await LongRunningOperation();
  //More code.
}

Will do.

EDIT:

You can also do:

private void DoSomething()
{
  var counter = LongRunningOperation().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
  //More code
}

If you don't want to make the method async.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.