50

I have written this small function to get all keys and values of an object and store them into an array. The object might contain arrays as values...

Object { 0: [1,2,3,4] } to [0,1,2,3,4] converting all elements to integers

I wonder whether there is a faster/cleaner way to do so:

function flattenObject(obj) {
    // Returns array with all keys and values of an object
    var array = [];
    $.each(obj, function (key, value) {
        array.push(key);
        if ($.isArray(value)) {
            $.each(value, function (index, element) {
                array.push(element);
            });
        }
        else {
            array.push(value);
        }
    });

    return array
}
7
  • 2
    please add some data and the wanted output. May 23, 2017 at 12:05
  • There really isn't a 'good' way to do this (to arbitrary levels of nesting) in JS. The obvious solution is recursive which means you're potentially dealing with blowing the stack. If you're certain its only one level deep then your code is fine. May 23, 2017 at 12:12
  • Asking for code improvement is a better fit for codereview.stackexchange.com What don't you like about your code? A question that asks for "best way" is not a good fit for SO because there are many different correct answers. May 23, 2017 at 12:22
  • @JaredSmith Well, the OP doesn't seem to want to do this to arbitrary levels of nesting. In any case, you're not going to blow the stack unless you have objects nested thousands or tens of thousands deep.
    – user663031
    May 23, 2017 at 12:22
  • 2
    The operation of flattening an object like this triggers my smell detector. May 23, 2017 at 12:34

16 Answers 16

82

I wanted to flatten my deep object to one level depth. None of the above solutions worked for me.

My input:

{
    "user": {
        "key_value_map": {
            "CreatedDate": "123424",
            "Department": {
                "Name": "XYZ"
            }
        }
    }
}

Expected output:

{
    "user.key_value_map.CreatedDate": "123424",
    "user.key_value_map.Department.Name": "XYZ"
}

Code that worked for me:

function flattenObject(ob) {
    var toReturn = {};

    for (var i in ob) {
        if (!ob.hasOwnProperty(i)) continue;

        if ((typeof ob[i]) == 'object' && ob[i] !== null) {
            var flatObject = flattenObject(ob[i]);
            for (var x in flatObject) {
                if (!flatObject.hasOwnProperty(x)) continue;

                toReturn[i + '.' + x] = flatObject[x];
            }
        } else {
            toReturn[i] = ob[i];
        }
    }
    return toReturn;
}
6
  • 1
    You have multiple levels, so you would need to create a function and recursively call it
    – ddomingo
    Dec 12, 2018 at 13:19
  • 1
    @ddomingo I am actually calling my method recursively to reach deeper levels. Check line 6, did I miss something? Dec 12, 2018 at 15:09
  • 1
    Works like a charm, including nested arrays, unlike some NPM packages
    – MartijnvdB
    Oct 24, 2019 at 13:51
  • 1
    The inner loop can be simplified, please refer to my answer
    – Tofandel
    Jan 17, 2020 at 12:36
  • I also found an edge case, empty array's keys are removed from the output, it may not be desired
    – Tofandel
    Jul 2, 2020 at 16:44
34

Flattening Object can be done using recursion as below :

Sample Input

const obj = {
    name: "test",
    address: {
        personal: "abc",
        office: {
            building: 'random',
            street: 'some street'
        }
    }
}

Expected Output

{
    name : "test",
    address_personal: "abc"
    address_office_building: "random"
    address_office_street: "some street"
}


My Solution

  function flattenObj(obj, parent, res = {}){
    for(let key in obj){
        let propName = parent ? parent + '_' + key : key;
        if(typeof obj[key] == 'object'){
            flattenObj(obj[key], propName, res);
        } else {
            res[propName] = obj[key];
        }
    }
    return res;
}

Hope it helps

2
  • 2
    obj[key] == 'object' this is true in case of array as well
    – Santosh
    Oct 20, 2019 at 9:41
  • 1
    Maybe typeof obj[key] === typeof {} && !Array.isArray(obj[key]) would be good to go ❤
    – chankruze
    Jul 22, 2021 at 22:07
33

You could just concat all keys and values. (It does not solve the type casting to number for keys.)

var object =  { 0: [1, 2, 3, 4] },
    result = Object.keys(object).reduce(function (r, k) {
        return r.concat(k, object[k]);
    }, []);
    
console.log(result);

1
  • 9
    If you don't want the object keys to be added to the array, simply remove k from .concat(). Ex: Object.keys(object).reduce(function (r, k) { return r.concat(object[k]); }, []);
    – Doug
    Oct 5, 2017 at 12:52
23

This answer is an improvement of @Muthukrishnan 's answer

If you want to flatten an object deeply outputting the values into a one level deep object keyed with the path of the value in the previous object

(eg: { foo: { bar: 'baz'} } => { 'foo.bar': 'baz' })

Here is how you can effectively do it:

/**
 * @param ob Object                 The object to flatten
 * @param prefix String (Optional)  The prefix to add before each key, also used for recursion
 **/
function flattenObject(ob, prefix = false, result = null) {
  result = result || {};

  // Preserve empty objects and arrays, they are lost otherwise
  if (prefix && typeof ob === 'object' && ob !== null && Object.keys(ob).length === 0) {
    result[prefix] = Array.isArray(ob) ? [] : {};
    return result;
  }

  prefix = prefix ? prefix + '.' : '';

  for (const i in ob) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(ob, i)) {
      if (typeof ob[i] === 'object' && ob[i] !== null) {
        // Recursion on deeper objects
        flattenObject(ob[i], prefix + i, result);
      } else {
        result[prefix + i] = ob[i];
      }
    }
  }
  return result;
}

/**
 * Bonus function to unflatten an object
 *
 * @param ob Object     The object to unflatten
 */
function unflattenObject(ob) {
  const result = {};
  for (const i in ob) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(ob, i)) {
      const keys = i.match(/^\.+[^.]*|[^.]*\.+$|(?:\.{2,}|[^.])+(?:\.+$)?/g); // Just a complicated regex to only match a single dot in the middle of the string
      keys.reduce((r, e, j) => {
        return r[e] || (r[e] = isNaN(Number(keys[j + 1])) ? (keys.length - 1 === j ? ob[i] : {}) : []);
      }, result);
    }
  }
  return result;
}


// TESTS
const obj = {
  value: {
    foo: {
      bar: 'yes',
      so: {
        freakin: {
          nested: 'Wow',
        }
      }
    },
  },
  // Some edge cases to test
  test: [true, false, [null, undefined, 1]],
  not_lost: [], // Empty arrays should be preserved
  not_lost2: {}, // Empty objects should be preserved
  // Be careful with object having dots in the keys
  'I.like.dots..in.object.keys...': "... Please don't override me",
  I: {
    like: {
      'dots..in': {
        object: {
          'keys...': "You've been overwritten"
        }
      }
    }
  }
};
console.log(flattenObject(['I', {'am': 'an array'}]));
let flat = flattenObject(obj);
console.log(flat, unflattenObject(flat));

There is an obvious problem that you could encounter with flattening this way if your object contains keys with dots, this is documented in the fiddle

5
  • Elegant! I wonder if unflattener could take a prefix as an argument. I guess it could just take a regex. Dec 28, 2020 at 9:37
  • Question: the line result[prefix] = Array.isArray(ob) ? [] : {}; looks funny, since prefix is either false or a string, so in theory prefix could be false at that stage and result[false] = … doesn’t seem to make sense🤔 Dec 28, 2020 at 11:28
  • 1
    @AntonStrogonoff You are correct, this line is only intended to be executed in recursive calls and not on the first iteration I added a condition so that it doesn't run if you pass an empty object to flattenObject
    – Tofandel
    Jan 4, 2021 at 13:46
  • @AntonStrogonoff I missed your comment re the prefix in unflatten, I'd say it can be worked around by just going to the value of the key you want after unflattening maybe not the best performance wise but if you implement unflatten with a prefix, you can make a gist and I'll integrate it in my answer
    – Tofandel
    Jun 18, 2021 at 11:12
  • Actually, I think prefix && … condition should take care of ensuring prefix is not false. Either way, here’s one possible implementation with (possibly excessive) value checks, but it’s in TypeScript: gist.github.com/strogonoff/08e9a3eb180ff6858e7bdd887412c8d0 Jun 19, 2021 at 18:27
16

I needed something really simple and here is a one-liner I came up with:

function flatten(obj){
  return Object.values(obj).flat()
}

Obviously, this is subject to your browser/JS env supporting this syntax. Here is a working example.

const flatten=(obj)=>Object.values(obj).flat()

const x={x:[1,2,3],y:[4,5,6,7]}

console.log(flatten(x))

5
  • 1
    Please use this answer carefully. This is just a proposal and not supported in Firefox, Edge... developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Mar 6, 2019 at 12:19
  • 1
    Browser compatibilty is a different question. Most would use Babel or other transpilers to safely target required browsers.
    – husayt
    Jun 13, 2019 at 10:04
  • Array.prototype.flat is now supported in all major browsers
    – Bin Ury
    May 21, 2020 at 19:13
  • Yes, there is clause in the answer that this is subject to browser support. This simple one line implementation doesn't aim to cover arrays or complex structures. Sometimes, this is just what is needed. Lodash is not an answer to everything.
    – husayt
    Jul 3, 2020 at 17:12
  • Yup, precisely what I needed
    – Murwa
    Apr 5 at 1:02
7

A more modern JavaScript and TypeScript implementation of a simple object to flat property map converter. It's using Object.entries to do a proper for of loop only on owned properties.

Exmaple Input:

const address = {
  name: 'Address 1',
  address: {
    street: {name: 'Test Street', no: 123}
  }
};

Output:

{
    'address.street.name': 'Test Street'
    'address.street.no': 123
    'name': 'Address 1'
}

JavaScript:

export function toFlatPropertyMap(obj, keySeparator = '.') {
  const flattenRecursive = (obj, parentProperty, propertyMap = {}) => {
    for(const [key, value] of Object.entries(obj)){
      const property = parentProperty ? `${parentProperty}${keySeparator}${key}` : key;
      if(value && typeof value === 'object'){
        flattenRecursive(value, property, propertyMap);
      } else {
        propertyMap[property] = value;
      }
    }
    return propertyMap;
  };
  return flattenRecursive(obj);
}

TypeScript:

export function toFlatPropertyMap(obj: object, keySeparator = '.') {
  const flattenRecursive = (obj: object, parentProperty?: string, propertyMap: Record<string, unknown> = {}) => {
    for(const [key, value] of Object.entries(obj)){
      const property = parentProperty ? `${parentProperty}${keySeparator}${key}` : key;
      if(value && typeof value === 'object'){
        flattenRecursive(value, property, propertyMap);
      } else {
        propertyMap[property] = value;
      }
    }
    return propertyMap;
  };
  return flattenRecursive(obj);
}
6

If you're feeling really lazy then you can make use of the popular NPM library flat.

Example (from their docs)

var flatten = require('flat')

flatten({
    key1: {
        keyA: 'valueI'
    },
    key2: {
        keyB: 'valueII'
    },
    key3: { a: { b: { c: 2 } } }
})

// {
//   'key1.keyA': 'valueI',
//   'key2.keyB': 'valueII',
//   'key3.a.b.c': 2
// }
3

Generate an array of tuples (two-element arrays) of keys and values (which might themselves be arrays), then deep-flatten it.

function flattenObject(obj) { 
      return flatten(Object.keys(obj).map(k => [toNumber(k), obj[k]]));
}

// Substitute your own favorite flattening algorithm.
const flatten = a => Array.isArray(a) ? [].concat(...a.map(flatten)) : a;

// Convert to number, if you can.
const toNumber = n => isNaN(+n) ? n : +n;

console.log(flattenObject({a: [1, 2], b: 3, 0: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]}));

1
  • 1
    "...to get all keys and values of an object and store them into an array..."
    – Joe Clay
    May 23, 2017 at 12:02
3

You can skip the inner loop if you have to push contents of an array to another array. See if this helps --

function flattenObject(obj) {
// Returns array with all keys and values of an object
var array = [];
$.each(obj, function (key, value) {
    array.push(key);
    if ($.isArray(value)) {
        Array.prototype.push.apply(array, value);
    }
    else {
        array.push(value);
    }
});

return array;
}
var obj = {"key1" : [1,3,3],"key2" : "val", "key3":23};
var output = flattenObject(obj);
console.log(output);

Fiddle Link -- https://jsfiddle.net/0wu5z79a/1/

EDIT : This solution is valid only for your scenario where you know that the nesting is till one level only else you need to have some recursion for deep inner objects.

2

I use this recursive function:

function flattenObject(obj, prefix = '') {
  return Object.keys(obj).reduce((acc, k) => {
    const pre = prefix.length ? prefix + '.' : '';
    if (typeof obj[k] === 'object') Object.assign(acc, flattenObject(obj[k], pre + k));
    else acc[pre + k] = obj[k];
    return acc;
  }, {});
}

Example of use:

const obj = { a: { b: { c: 1 } }, d: 1 };
const output = flattenObject(obj);
console.log(output); //{"a.b.c":1,"d":1}
1

Using Reduce in typescript It will be something like

export const flattenObject = (obj: Record<string, unknown>): Record<string, unknown> =>
  Object.entries(obj).reduce((acc, [key, value]) => {
    if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null) {
      Object.entries(value).forEach(([iKey, iValue]) => {
        acc[`${key}-${iKey}`] = iValue;
      });
    } else {
      acc[key] = value;
    }
    return acc;
  }, {});
0

The function below will flatten an object to the specified depth. This function uses a loop rather than recursion. You can choose how child property keys are named, the default is 'parent.child'. The result is an array of [key, value] arrays, like Object.entries(). It requires lodash for isPlainObject and partition(), though you could write your own isPlainObject, partition functions if you wanted to remove the dependency.

/**
 * Returns an array containing the properties of the given Object in the same format
 * as Object.entries(). Goes through child objects to the specified depth, 
 * flattening the properties and prefixing child keys with a parent key names.
 * @param {Object} object to retrieve property values for
 * @param {Number} maxDepth the maximum number of times to look at properties of
 * properties of the given object.
 * Set to 1 to only retrieve the property values of the given object, 2 to get
 * properties and sub-properties etc.
 * @param {Function} keyPrefixer a function that takes a parent object name, and
 * a child object name and returns a string representing the combined name.
 * @returns {Array} containing the properties and child properties of the given object.
 * Each property is returned as an array [key, value]. 
 * Returns an empty array if object is null, undefined, not-an-object, or empty.
 */
const flattenEntries = (
  object,
  maxDepth = 2,
  keyPrefixer = (parentKey, childKey) => `${parentKey}.${childKey}`) => {

  if (!object || !_.isPlainObject(object)) {
    return [];
  }

  // make maxDepth >= 1
  maxDepth = Math.max(1, Math.abs(maxDepth));

  const entryIsNotAnObject = ([key, val]) => !_.isPlainObject(val);

  let [simpleProperties, childObjects] = _.partition(Object.entries(object), entryIsNotAnObject);

  let result = simpleProperties;

  for (let depth = 1; depth < maxDepth; depth++) {

    for (let [childObjectKey, childObject] of childObjects) {
      const entries = Object.entries(childObject);
      const addParentPrefixToKey = ([key, val]) => [keyPrefixer(childObjectKey, key), val];
      const prefixedEntries = entries.map(addParentPrefixToKey);
      [simpleProperties, childObjects] = _.partition(prefixedEntries, entryIsNotAnObject);
      result = result.concat(simpleProperties);
    }
  }

  return result;
};

const test = {
  a: 'one',
  b: {
    c: 'three',
    d: {
      e: {
        f: ['six', 'six'],
        g: 7
      }
    }
  }
};

console.log(flattenEntries(test, 10));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.15/lodash.min.js"></script>

3
  • It works, performs efficiently without recursing, allows you to choose how to format the output, and is predictable about how far down the object structure it will go. A deeply nested object could overflow the stack with the recursive solutions show above.
    – Module11
    May 27, 2020 at 14:51
  • I personally have never seen an object with 10000 levels of nesting that would blow the recursion stack, it would likely blow your browser's memory before that.. Outputting as an array does solve the dot in the keys issue though but I wouldn't call it flat then. It also has the problem that you need to know the max depth of your object and cannot set it as an arbitrary big number as that would make the function very slow because of the loop
    – Tofandel
    Jul 2, 2020 at 15:58
  • @Tofandel never say never. What this solution does is makes the code predictable; this avoids any unexpected behaviour. This could happen for example if you had user generated input that you were processing where you cannot make any assumptions about the data coming in. The benefit of this solution is you can choose how deep an object you are happy to support in your application, the default is 2, though you can just as easily set it to 100, or 1000 and you should never have any problems in production.
    – Module11
    Sep 3, 2020 at 9:47
0

This solution can handle deeply nested objects

const isObject = o => o && typeof o === 'object' && !(o instanceof Date);

const flattenObject = obj => Object.entries(obj).reduce((acc, [key, val]) => ({
  ...acc, ...(isObject(val) ? flattenObject(val) : { [key]: val })
}), {});

Remember that this function returns an empty object for strings, dates, numbers, etc.

0

The following solution handles the case for null values and arrays.

let user = {
  name: "John Doe",
  address: {
    personal: {
      city: "Haridwar",
      state: "Uttrakhand",
      area: "Majra",
    },
    office: {
      city: "Hyderabad",
      area: {
        landmark: "Hi Tech",
        pincode: [12321, 23414],
        lane: null
      }
    }
  }
}


function more_magic() {
  let ans = {};
  let magic = function (obj, parent) {
    for (let key in obj) {
      if (typeof obj[key] === "object" && obj[key] !== null && Array.isArray(obj[key]) === false) {
        magic(obj[key], parent + "_" + key);
      } else {
        ans[parent + "_" + key] = obj[key];
      }
    }
  }
  magic(user, "user");
  return ans;
}
console.log(more_magic())

0

I needed something similar that would deep flatten objects recursively into a string, but with customizations on different provided matchers. Based on some examples here this is what I finally ended up with, using lodash and some lodash fp functions. This way you can reduce true down to just "T" and undefined down to just "U". The matchers will need a matching key with the process. Everything else is just processed with String(item)

import _ from "lodash"

import flow from "lodash/fp/flow"
import some from "lodash/fp/some"
import reduce from "lodash/fp/reduce" 
....

const deepValuesToComparableString = items => {
  let matchers = {
    u: _.isUndefined, n: _.isNull,
    b: _.isBoolean, o: _.isObject,
    a: _.isArray, z: _.stubTrue
  }
  let process = {
    u: _.constant("U"), n: _.constant("N"),
    b: b => b ? "T" : "F", o: flow(_.flatMapDeep, _.values),
    a: _.flattenDeep, z: String
   }
  let convertForMatch = _.cond(_.zip(_.values(matchers), _.values(process)))
  let stillHasDepth = some(matchers.o || matchers.a)
  let valuesFor = reduce((acc, item) => [...acc, ...convertForMatch(item)], [])
  let flatReduceValues = reduce((acc, item) => [
    ...acc, ...stillHasDepth(item) 
      ? valuesFor(flatReduceValues(valuesFor(item))) 
      : valuesFor(item)
  ], [])
  return flatReduceValues(items).join("")
}

unit test:

test("it converts a 1d array of models into a string", () => {
  let someArrayData = [
    new TestDataClass({ someStr: "Test1", someOtherStr: "Abc", someNum: 1, someBool: false, someObjWithArrField: { someField: "some obj field", subRows: [{someSubRowField: "123", someOtherSubRowField: "testA"  }]}}),
    new TestDataClass({ someStr: "Test2", someOtherStr: undefined, someNum: 2, someBool: true,  someObjWithArrField: { someField: "obj field 2", subRows: [{someSubRowField: "234", someOtherSubRowField: "test B" }]}}),
    new TestDataClass({ someStr: "Sfds3", someOtherStr: "GGG", someNum: 3, someBool: null,  someObjWithArrField: { someField: "some field 3", subRows: [{someSubRowField: "456", someOtherSubRowField: "test C" }]}}),
  ]
  let result = deepValuesToComparableString(someArrayData)
  let expectedStr = "Test1Abc1Fsome obj field123testATest2U2Tobj field 2234test BSfds3GGG3Nsome field 3456test C"
  expect(result).toEqual(expectedStr)
})
0

Using ES6 "Spread Operator"... , Please let me know for flaws 😊

function flattenObj(data, parent = null){
// Create an empty object .
let dataMap = {}
// Loop over the data object that was given .
for(const key in data){
    // Set a key name by checking if parent was set by previous recursive calls .
    const keyName = parent ? parent + '.' + key : key;
    // Check the data type.
    if(typeof data[key] === 'object' && !Array.isArray(data[key])) {
        // Using ES6 "Spread Operator" i overwrite the dataMap object with:
        // current dataMap + returned object result of the recurive call .
        dataMap = { ...dataMap, ...flattenObj(data[key], keyName)};
    } else {
        // If data type is anything but an object append the "key: value" .
        dataMap[keyName] = data[key];
    }
}
return dataMap;

}

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