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I have a shader that ideally needs 28 bits of mantissa, though I can use less and degrade performance. How can I determine what the precision of 'highp' is in OpenGL ES? It's probably an FP24, with 16bits mantissa, but I cannot figure out for sure or how to ask OpenGL. Any ideas?

3 Answers 3

37

From the OpenGL ES Shading Language reference:

  • highp - 16-bit, floating point range: -2^62 to 2^62, integer range: -2^16 to 2^16
  • mediump - 10 bit, floating point range: -2^14 to 2^14, integer range: -2^10 to 2^10
  • lowp - 8 bit, floating point range: -2 to 2, integer range: -2^8 to 2^8
5
  • 1
    That's the minimum precision required by the standard. Is it also the actual precision used by the PVR SGX GPUs?
    – Minthos
    Dec 11, 2012 at 10:19
  • It isn't. On my device the numbers appear to be 31 bits, 15 bits and 8 bits. Probably 32, 16 and 8. I don't know where the last bit went.
    – Minthos
    Dec 11, 2012 at 10:52
  • Integers appear to be 24 bit regardless of type.
    – Minthos
    Dec 11, 2012 at 10:56
  • 5
    I don't want to nitpick, but GLSL does not mandate anything with respect to the number of bits required to represent lowp, mediump or highp, only the minimum range of values and precision. So for lowp floating-point values, we have a guaranteed range of [-2.0,2.0] and precision of 2.0^-8 but that says nothing of how many bits the system uses to represent it. Mar 5, 2015 at 13:21
  • If the specification for highp is +/- 2^16 integers, then doesn't that mean it has 16 bits of mantissa, and it has more bits than that total? May 20, 2019 at 10:46
17

In my testing on my line of expensive toys:

For both ints and floats, the precisions and ranges across fragment and vertex shaders are the same.

So I will not list all combinations exhaustively.

Also note that precision of ints is defined to be always 0.

PowerVR SGX543MP3 (iPhone 5):

  • Floats
    • Low: precision = 8, range = 0 to 0 (Not sure, but I think this means that we cannot expect a lowp to actually be able to represent a value reaching exactly 2 or -2, I don't really know of a great way to test this, nor should we over-concern ourselves with these limitations, just use mediump when this could ever be an issue)
    • Medium: precision = 10, range = 15 to 15 (meets spec)
    • High: precision = 23, range = 127 to 127 (exceeds spec)
  • Ints
    • Low: range = 23 to 23 (exceeds spec)
    • Medium: range = 23 to 23 (exceeds spec)
    • High: range = 23 to 23 (exceeds spec)

A7 & PowerVR G6430 (iPad Air):

  • Floats
    • Low: precision = 10, range = 15 to 15 (exceeds spec)
    • Medium: precision = 10, range = 15 to 15 (meets spec)
    • High: precision = 23, range = 127 to 127 (exceeds ES 2.0 spec, meets 3.0 spec)
  • Ints
    • Low: range = 15 to 14 (exceeds spec)
    • Medium: range = 15 to 14 (exceeds ES 2.0 spec, meets ES 3.0 spec)
    • High: range = 31 to 30 (exceeds ES 2.0 spec, meets ES 3.0 spec)

A8 & PowerVR GX6450 (iPhone 6 Plus):

  • Floats
    • Low: precision = 10, range = 15 to 15 (exceeds spec)
    • Medium: precision = 10, range = 15 to 15 (meets spec)
    • High: precision = 23, range = 127 to 127 (exceeds ES 2.0 spec, meets 3.0 spec)
  • Ints
    • Low: range = 15 to 14 (exceeds spec)
    • Medium: range = 15 to 14 (exceeds ES 2.0 spec, meets ES 3.0 spec)
    • High: range = 31 to 30 (exceeds ES 2.0 spec, meets ES 3.0 spec)

Here is an example of how you might query the values.

int range[2], precision;
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_HIGH_FLOAT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Fragment shader high precision float range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_MEDIUM_FLOAT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Fragment shader medium precision float range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_LOW_FLOAT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Fragment shader low precision float range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);

glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_HIGH_INT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Fragment shader high precision int range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_MEDIUM_INT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Fragment shader medium precision int range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_LOW_INT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Fragment shader low precision int range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);

glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_VERTEX_SHADER, GL_HIGH_FLOAT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Vertex shader high precision float range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_VERTEX_SHADER, GL_MEDIUM_FLOAT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Vertex shader medium precision float range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_VERTEX_SHADER, GL_LOW_FLOAT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Vertex shader low precision float range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);

glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_VERTEX_SHADER, GL_HIGH_INT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Vertex shader high precision int range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_VERTEX_SHADER, GL_MEDIUM_INT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Vertex shader medium precision int range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_VERTEX_SHADER, GL_LOW_INT, range, &precision);
NSLog(@"Vertex shader low precision int range: %d %d precision: %d", range[0], range[1], precision);

It is not clear to me yet whether you can expect tangible performance improvements by choosing a lower-precision type (Even on some phones that are now 3 years old).

It's clear that the trend is towards convergence with desktop hardware as it can be seen that the recent GPU's have completely eliminated the 8 bit types and are recycling the mediump ones for lowp.

13

You want GetShaderPrecisionFormat to query the range and precision of of shader types

int range[2], precision;
glGetShaderPrecisionFormat(GL_FRAGMENT_SHADER, GL_HIGH_FLOAT, range, &precision);

will give you the range and precision of highp float.

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  • Do you mean glGetShaderPrecisionFormat? glGetShaderPrecisionType seems to be a typo.
    – gonzojive
    Dec 13, 2010 at 5:14
  • glGetShaderPrecisionFormat sure works, so maybe you should edit your response to fix the typo and I can mark it correct. Just to make it easier on the next guy. Thanks for the answer!
    – gonzojive
    Dec 13, 2010 at 18:23
  • whoops -- yes, more of a brain-o than a typo -- just misremembering the name and not looking closely enough when checking the spec...
    – Chris Dodd
    Dec 13, 2010 at 18:52
  • Another minor error in the code: range should be an int array of length 2. The result is the same though.
    – Minthos
    Dec 11, 2012 at 10:36
  • What determines the precision types? Is it OS dependent? GPU dependent? Does it vary by programming language or OpenGL version? May 20, 2019 at 10:44

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