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Is there any way I can read bytes of a float value in JS? What I need is to write a raw FLOAT or DOUBLE value into some binary format I need to make, so is there any way to get a byte-by-byte IEEE 754 representation? And same question for writing of course.

2

Would this snippet help?

var parser = new BinaryParser
  ,forty = parser.encodeFloat(40.0,2,8) 
  ,twenty = parser.encodeFloat(20.0,2,8);  
console.log(parser.decodeFloat(forty,2,8).toFixed(1));   //=> 40.0
console.log(parser.decodeFloat(twenty,2,8).toFixed(1));  //=> 20.0
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  • 6
    The algorithm used in that snippet is thoroughly broken. It fails on particular values when used to read floats or doubles. For example, it reads 40.0 as 32.0, and 20.0 as 16.0. – Katelyn Gadd Mar 25 '12 at 10:38
  • 2
    Having BinaryParser makes you dependent on that snippet. – Vasiliy Stavenko Apr 20 '14 at 2:07
  • 6
    Do not use this BinaryParser class! It is not strict compliant (it uses with)! – Qix - MONICA WAS MISTREATED Sep 17 '14 at 0:11
40

You can do it with typed arrays:

var buffer = new ArrayBuffer(4);
var intView = new Int32Array(buffer);
var floatView = new Float32Array(buffer);

floatView[0] = Math.PI
console.log(intView[0].toString(2)); //bits of the 32 bit float

Or another way:

var view = new DataView(new ArrayBuffer(4));
view.setFloat32(0, Math.PI);
console.log(view.getInt32(0).toString(2)); //bits of the 32 bit float

Not sure what browser support is like though

9
8

I've created an expansion of Milos' solution that should be a bit faster, assuming TypedArrays are not an option of course (in my case I'm working with an environment where they're not available):

function Bytes2Float32(bytes) {
    var sign = (bytes & 0x80000000) ? -1 : 1;
    var exponent = ((bytes >> 23) & 0xFF) - 127;
    var significand = (bytes & ~(-1 << 23));

    if (exponent == 128) 
        return sign * ((significand) ? Number.NaN : Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY);

    if (exponent == -127) {
        if (significand == 0) return sign * 0.0;
        exponent = -126;
        significand /= (1 << 22);
    } else significand = (significand | (1 << 23)) / (1 << 23);

    return sign * significand * Math.pow(2, exponent);
}

Given an integer containing 4 bytes holding an IEEE-754 32-bit single precision float, this will produce the (roughly) correct Javascript number value without using any loops.

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  • 1
    if (significand == 0) return sign * 0.0; - surely anything times zero is... zero? Does -1 * 0.0 produce negative zero? – Nick Oct 22 '13 at 22:13
  • @Haravikk, What about getting the bit representation of a number? – Pacerier Apr 17 '17 at 18:39
  • @Pacerier: My answer to another question should help with that: stackoverflow.com/a/16043259/2187548 – Haravikk Apr 18 '17 at 19:36
3

Koolinc's snippet is good if you need a solution that powerful, but if you need it for limited use you are better off writing your own code. I wrote the following function for converting a string hex representation of bytes to a float:

function decodeFloat(data) {
    var binary = parseInt(data, 16).toString(2);
    if (binary.length < 32) 
        binary = ('00000000000000000000000000000000'+binary).substr(binary.length);
    var sign = (binary.charAt(0) == '1')?-1:1;
    var exponent = parseInt(binary.substr(1, 8), 2) - 127;
    var significandBase = binary.substr(9);
    var significandBin = '1'+significandBase;
    var i = 0;
    var val = 1;
    var significand = 0;

    if (exponent == -127) {
        if (significandBase.indexOf('1') == -1)
            return 0;
        else {
            exponent = -126;
            significandBin = '0'+significandBase;
        }
    }

    while (i < significandBin.length) {
        significand += val * parseInt(significandBin.charAt(i));
        val = val / 2;
        i++;
    }

    return sign * significand * Math.pow(2, exponent);
}

There are detailed explanations of algorithms used to convert in both directions for all formats of floating points on wikipedia, and it is easy to use those to write your own code. Converting from a number to bytes should be more difficult because you need to normalize the number first.

1
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    I've expanded this solution to handle 64-bit floats and little-endian encoding. It also takes an array of bytes instead of a base-16 string (so that 64-bit floats work fine without rounding issues). gist.github.com/2192799 – Katelyn Gadd Mar 25 '12 at 10:53
3

I had a similar problem, I wanted to convert any javascript number to a Buffer and then parse it back without stringifying it.

function numberToBuffer(num) {
  const buf = new Buffer(8)
  buf.writeDoubleLE(num, 0)
  return buf
}

Use example:

// convert a number to buffer
const buf = numberToBuffer(3.14)
// and then from a Buffer
buf.readDoubleLE(0) === 3.14

This works on current Node LTS (4.3.1) and up. didn't test in lower versions.

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    I can confirm that this also works on Node.js 0.10.40. With my old version of Node-RED (0.11.1) I obviously don't have access to Float32Array so your solution is the only one for me! I use 'new Buffer(array)' to create the Buffer from a 4 byte binary float array and buffer.readFloatBE(0) to retreive the float. – winne2 Jan 6 '17 at 16:47
  • Tested on Node.JS 10.15, this solution seems faster than using typed arrays. Obviously if you're not using Node.JS, you cannot use buffers. – Oren Jun 25 '19 at 11:27
0

I expect you could figure it out (blech), but I assume you're asking if there's something built-in. Not as far as I've ever heard; see sections 8.5 and 15.7 of the spec.

0

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