34

In rspec you can do something like this:

let(:input) { 'foo' }
before_each do
   setup_some_thing(input)
end

context 'when input is bar do
  let(:input) { 'bar' }
  it 'does something different' do
  end
end

context 'when input is baz do
  let(:input) { 'baz' }
  it 'does something else different' do
  end
end

This allows you to define a method call or instantiation of a large object as a sum of its smaller parts. You can then override those individual small parts inside different contexts. The idea being that you create a happy path before each test, and then specify deviations from the happy path within your context blocks.

Unfortunately, I can't seem to do this with Jest. I've tried the following:

beforeEach(() => {
  let input = 'foo';
  beforeEach(() => {
    setupSomeThing(input);
  });

  describe('when input is bar', () => {
    input = 'bar';
    it('does something different', () => {

    });
  });

  describe('when input is baz', () => {
    input = 'baz';
    it('does something different', () => {

    });
  });
});

Because jest executes every describe block before running any specific describe block, input is always 'baz'. Does anyone know a work around, or a way to get the rspec behavior?

Thanks in advance!

Update

You can get similar behavior (albeit without lazy evaluation) using beforeAll.

beforeEach(() => {
  let input = 'foo';
  beforeEach(() => {
    setupSomeThing(input);
  });

  describe('when input is bar', () => {
    beforeAll(() => {
     input = 'bar';
    });

    it('does something different', () => {

    });
  });

  describe('when input is baz', () => {
    beforeAll(() => {
     input = 'baz';
    });        

    it('does something different', () => {

    });
  });
});
  • 3
    Put the assignment inside the it? – Bergi May 23 '17 at 17:19
  • 7
    Try also look at github.com/tatyshev/given2 – Ruslan Dec 20 '17 at 23:05
  • 3
    Also take a look at github.com/stalniy/bdd-lazy-var – rudolph9 Jun 12 '18 at 17:16
  • 3
    It's been a while since I've messed with this. What's at stake is code duplication. With the rspec let way of doing things, you can avoid calling setupSomeThing in every single "it" block. Or separate before blocks in each describe block. With one function, it's somewhat trivial to do without the rspec-style lets. But if the setup requires 8 different inputs, some of which need to change between contexts and some that don't, it's much easier to just have that setup code once in a before block that uses "let" variables that are changed depending on the context. – Noah May 14 at 21:50
  • 2
    It ends up cleaning up your test code substantially. The lets act as declarative control switches to hit different branches of the code under test. This reduces the test to clean blocks specifying what the switches are (essentially specifying what logical branches to go through) followed by a set of it blocks describing all of the things that should happen given that set of lets. – Noah May 14 at 21:58
3

The best solutions I've found have been libraries like

https://github.com/stalniy/bdd-lazy-var

and

https://github.com/tatyshev/given2

If you don't want to introduce a dependency, you can get similar behavior (albeit without lazy evaluation) by doing something like this:

beforeEach(() => {
  let input = 'foo';
  beforeEach(() => {
    setupSomeThing(input);
  });

  describe('when input is bar', () => {
    beforeAll(() => {
     input = 'bar';
    });

    it('does something different', () => {

    });
  });

  describe('when input is baz', () => {
    beforeAll(() => {
     input = 'baz';
    });        

    it('does something different', () => {

    });
  });
});

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