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I am trying to write an app that does something specific when it is brought back to the foreground after some amount of time. Is there a way to detect when an app is sent to the background or brought to the foreground?

  • 2
    May be to add a use case to the question because it doesn't seem to be obvious, so it's not addressed in the answers given. The app may start another app (Gallery for example), which will still reside in the same stack and appear as one of the app's screens, and then press Home button. None of the methods relying on App lifecycle (or even memory management) are able to detect this. They would trigger background state right when external Activity appears, not when you press Home. – Dennis K Mar 25 '15 at 19:41
  • This is the answer you're looking for: stackoverflow.com/a/42679191/2352699 – Fred Porciúncula Mar 8 '17 at 18:42
  • 1
    See Google Solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/3667022/… – user1269737 Feb 13 '18 at 13:17

40 Answers 40

0

This is my solution https://github.com/doridori/AndroidUtils/blob/master/App/src/main/java/com/doridori/lib/app/ActivityCounter.java

Basically involved counting the lifecycle methods for all Activity's with a timer to catch cases where there is no activity currently in the foreground but the app is (i.e. on rotation)

0

Here is my solution. Just register this ActivityLifecycleCallbacks in your main Application class. In the comments, I mention a user profile Activity edge case. That Activity is simply one with transparent edges.

/**
 * This class used Activity lifecycle callbacks to determine when the application goes to the
 * background as well as when it is brought to the foreground.
 */
public class Foreground implements Application.ActivityLifecycleCallbacks
{
    /**
     * How long to wait before checking onStart()/onStop() count to determine if the app has been
     * backgrounded.
     */
    public static final long BACKGROUND_CHECK_DELAY_MS = 500;

    private static Foreground sInstance;

    private final Handler mMainThreadHandler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
    private boolean mIsForeground = false;
    private int mCount;

    public static void init(final Application application)
    {
        if (sInstance == null)
        {
            sInstance = new Foreground();
            application.registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(sInstance);
        }
    }

    public static Foreground getInstance()
    {
        return sInstance;
    }

    public boolean isForeground()
    {
        return mIsForeground;
    }

    public boolean isBackground()
    {
        return !mIsForeground;
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityStarted(final Activity activity)
    {
        mCount++;

        // Remove posted Runnables so any Meteor disconnect is cancelled if the user comes back to
        // the app before it runs.
        mMainThreadHandler.removeCallbacksAndMessages(null);

        if (!mIsForeground)
        {
            mIsForeground = true;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityStopped(final Activity activity)
    {
        mCount--;

        // A transparent Activity like community user profile won't stop the Activity that launched
        // it. If you launch another Activity from the user profile or hit the Android home button,
        // there are two onStops(). One for the user profile and one for its parent. Remove any
        // posted Runnables so we don't get two session ended events.
        mMainThreadHandler.removeCallbacksAndMessages(null);
        mMainThreadHandler.postDelayed(new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                if (mCount == 0)
                {
                    mIsForeground = false;
                }
            }
        }, BACKGROUND_CHECK_DELAY_MS);
    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityCreated(final Activity activity, final Bundle savedInstanceState)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityResumed(final Activity activity)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityPaused(final Activity activity)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivitySaveInstanceState(final Activity activity, final Bundle outState)
    {

    }

    @Override
    public void onActivityDestroyed(final Activity activity)
    {

    }
}
0

My app needs to "reboot" after return from background - show a series of activities, according to client solicitations. After extensive search on how to manage the background/foreground transitions (treated very differently between iOS and Android), I crossed this question. Found very useful help here, specially from the most voted answer and the one flagged as correct. However, simply reinstantiate the root activity EVERY TIME the app enters foreground looked too annoying, when you think about UX. The solution that worked for me, and the one I think's most adequated - based on the Youtube and Twitter apps functionality - was to combine the answers from @GirishNair and @d60402: Calling the timer when the app's trimming memory, as follows:

@Override
public void onTrimMemory(int level) {
    if (stateOfLifeCycle.equals("Stop")) {
        startActivityTransitionTimer();
    }

    super.onTrimMemory(level);
}

My Timer limit is set to 30 seconds - I'm thinking about increasing this a little.

private final long MAX_ACTIVITY_TRANSITION_TIME = 30000;

And when app goes into foreground, is relaunched, or the app's destroyed, call the method to cancel timer.

On App extension:

@Override
public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, Bundle arg1) {
    stopActivityTransitionTimer();
    stateOfLifeCycle = "Create";
}

@Override
public void onActivityDestroyed(Activity activity) {
    stopActivityTransitionTimer();
    stateOfLifeCycle = "Destroy";
}

On the activity (preferably on a base activity, inherited by the others):

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    if (App.wasInBackground) {
        stopActivityTransitionTimer();
    }
}

In my case, when app goes foreground after the max time, a new task is created, so the stopActivityTransitionTimer() is called upon onActivityCreated() or onActivityDestroyed(), in the app extension class - turning unnecessary to call the method in an activity. Hope it helps.

0

How about this solution

public class BaseActivity extends Activity
{

    static String currentAct = "";

    @Override
    protected void onStart()
    {
        super.onStart();

        if (currentAct.equals(""))
            Toast.makeText(this, "Start", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();

        currentAct = getLocalClassName();
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStop()
    {
        super.onStop();

        if (currentAct.equals(getLocalClassName()))
        {
            currentAct = "";
            Toast.makeText(this, "Stop", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
        }
    }
}

All Activity need to extends BaseActivity.

When an activity call another (A->B) then currentAct is not equal getLocalClassName() because the onStart() of the second activity (B) is called before the onStop() of the first (A) (https://developer.android.com/guide/components/activities.html#CoordinatingActivities).

When the user press the home button or change between application will just call onStop() and then currentAct is equal getLocalClassName().

0

By using below code I'm able to get my app foreground or background state.

For more detail about it's working, strong text click here

import android.content.ComponentCallbacks2;
import android.content.Context;
import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

private Context context;
private Toast toast;

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);
    context = this;
}

private void showToast(String message) {
    //If toast is already showing cancel it
    if (toast != null) {
        toast.cancel();
    }

    toast = Toast.makeText(context, message, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
    toast.show();
}

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    showToast("App In Foreground");
}

@Override
public void onTrimMemory(int level) {
    super.onTrimMemory(level);
    if (level == ComponentCallbacks2.TRIM_MEMORY_UI_HIDDEN) {
        showToast("App In Background");
    }
  }
}
0

I managed to monitor app navigation going to background and back to foreground by implementing a BaseActivity that exploits the use of onResume, onPause and onStop activity callbacks. Here is my implementations.

override fun onResume() {
    super.onResume()
    if (AppActivityState.state == AppState.ON_LAUNCHED) {
        // We are in the first launch.
        onLaunched()
    } else {
        if (AppActivityState.state == AppState.ON_BACKGROUND) {
            // We came from background to foreground.
            AppActivityState.state = AppState.ON_FOREGROUND
            onForeground()
        } else {
            // We are just navigating through pages.
            AppActivityState.state = AppState.RESUMED
        }
    }
}

override fun onPause() {
    super.onPause()
    // If state is followed by onStop then it means we will going to background.
    AppActivityState.state = AppState.PAUSED
}

override fun onStop() {
    super.onStop()

    // App will go to background base on the 'pause' cue.
    if (AppActivityState.state == AppState.PAUSED) {
        AppActivityState.state = AppState.ON_BACKGROUND
        onBackground()
    }
}

After creating BaseActivity, you just have to extend this activity to any activity on your app.

In these type of implementation, you can accurately detect the following: - onBackground > app will go to background - onForeground > app will go back to foreground - onLaunch > app just opened

I hope this will help you :)

0

We can expand this solution using LiveData:

class AppForegroundStateLiveData : LiveData<AppForegroundStateLiveData.State>() {

    private var lifecycleListener: LifecycleObserver? = null

    override fun onActive() {
        super.onActive()
        lifecycleListener = AppLifecycleListener().also {
            ProcessLifecycleOwner.get().lifecycle.addObserver(it)
        }
    }

    override fun onInactive() {
        super.onInactive()
        lifecycleListener?.let {
            this.lifecycleListener = null
            ProcessLifecycleOwner.get().lifecycle.removeObserver(it)
        }
    }

    internal inner class AppLifecycleListener : LifecycleObserver {

        @OnLifecycleEvent(Lifecycle.Event.ON_START)
        fun onMoveToForeground() {
            value = State.FOREGROUND
        }

        @OnLifecycleEvent(Lifecycle.Event.ON_STOP)
        fun onMoveToBackground() {
            value = State.BACKGROUND
        }
    }

    enum class State {
        FOREGROUND, BACKGROUND
    }
}

Now we can subscribe to this LiveData and catch the needed events. For example:

appForegroundStateLiveData.observeForever { state ->
    when(state) {
        AppForegroundStateLiveData.State.FOREGROUND -> { /* app move to foreground */ }
        AppForegroundStateLiveData.State.BACKGROUND -> { /* app move to background */ }
    }
}
0

you can simply call this method in your application class

ProcessLifecycleOwner.get().getLifecycle().addObserver(new LifecycleEventObserver() {
            @Override
            public void onStateChanged(@NonNull LifecycleOwner source, @NonNull Lifecycle.Event event) {
                Log.e(TAG, "onStateChanged: " + event.toString());
            }
        });

Lifecycle.Event will simply return the state of the application

ON_CREATE
ON_START
ON_RESUME
ON_PAUSE
ON_STOP
ON_DESTROY
ON_ANY

it will return ON_PAUSE & ON_STOP when the app goes to background and will return ON_START & ON_RESUME when the app comes to the foreground

-1

I'm using this solution: http://nathanael.hevenet.com/android-dev-detecting-when-your-app-is-in-the-background-across-activities/

In short- Build a dedicate service that every activity report him about each lifecycle event, and this service get the info about the status of the app.

Very much like @oldschool4664 solution, but cleaner in my opinion

-3

The principal problem is that you have to get an specific behavior when you start an activity from background. If you override your onPause() and onResume() methods, you'll have a close answer, but not the solution. The problem is that onPause() and onResume() methods are called even if you don't minimize your application, they can be called when you start an activity and later you press the back button to return to your activity. To eliminate that problem and to know really when your application comes from background, you must to get the running process and compare with your process:

private boolean isApplicationBroughtToBackground() {
    ActivityManager am = (ActivityManager) getSystemService(Context.ACTIVITY_SERVICE);
    List<RunningTaskInfo> tasks = am.getRunningTasks(1);
    if (!tasks.isEmpty()) {
        ComponentName topActivity = tasks.get(0).topActivity;
        if (!topActivity.getPackageName().equals(getPackageName())) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Now you have to declare a boolean variable:

public boolean wasPaused = false;

And ask when your activity comes to background:

@Override
public void onPause(){
    super.onPause();
    if(isApplicationBroughtToBackground())
        wasPaused = true;
}

Now, when your activity comes to the screen again, ask in onResume() method:

@Override
public void onResume(){
    super.onResume();
    if(wasPaused){
        lockScreen(true);
    }
    wasPaused = false;
}

And this is it. Now, when your activity comes to background, and later the user brings it to foreground, the lock screen will appear.

If you want to repeat this behavior for whatever activity of your app, you have to create an activity (could be BaseActivity), put this methods, and all your activities have to inherit from BaseActivity.

I hope that this help to you.

Greetings!

  • 3
    As stated elsewhere on this page, getRunningTasks() is not intended for production code, and apparently, apps have been pulled for using it. – Nate Mar 15 '13 at 2:02

protected by Community Apr 17 '14 at 0:56

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