62

Is it possible to get the results of a test (i.e. whether all assertions have passed) in a tearDown() method? I'm running Selenium scripts, and I'd like to do some reporting from inside tearDown(), however I don't know if this is possible.

  • 1
    What kind of reporting? What exactly are you trying to do? – Falmarri Dec 11 '10 at 0:10
  • 4
    For instance, your test produces intermediate files (that are normally clean ed in tearDown) and you want to collect them if the test fails. – anatoly techtonik Dec 3 '12 at 9:39
  • Name of current test can be retrieved with unittest.id(). So in tearDown you can check self.id(). – gaoithe Jun 13 '16 at 11:23

12 Answers 12

14

CAVEAT: I have no way of double checking the following theory at the moment, being away from a dev box. So this may be a shot in the dark.

Perhaps you could check the return value of sys.exc_info() inside your tearDown() method, if it returns (None, None, None), you know the test case succeeded. Otherwise, you could use returned tuple to interrogate the exception object.

See sys.exc_info documentation.

Another more explicit approach is to write a method decorator that you could slap onto all your test case methods that require this special handling. This decorator can intercept assertion exceptions and based on that modify some state in self allowing your tearDown method to learn what's up.

@assertion_tracker
def test_foo(self):
    # some test logic
  • 2
    Unfortunately this doesn't make the distinction between "errors" and "failures" -- docs.python.org/library/unittest.html#organizing-test-code – Purrell Jun 25 '12 at 18:03
  • 8
    didn't work for me. sys.exc_info was always 3 Nones, even in tests with failures. May be difference with Python3 unittest? – hwjp Oct 30 '13 at 13:01
  • 1
    Using this method, if you are using nose.plugins.skip.SkipTest to mark tests as skipped, skipped tests will be reported as errors, since you raise SkipTest. This is probably not what you want in this case. – Clandestine Mar 10 '16 at 23:36
  • 2
    For the curious, this does NOT work for recent python versions. I believe that it breaks at python3.4 (ish). – mgilson Aug 30 '17 at 0:57
  • 6
    @mgilson This solution by exc_info() has been broken since Python 3.0 (the latest pre-release of 3.0 or rather 3.1.0 stable in Jun 2009) because the original sys.exc_info() is accessible only in the innermost try: ... except: ... block in Python 3. It is automatically cleared outside. Module unittest in Python 3.2 to 3.7-dev saves exc_info() before leaving the "except" block or converts the important part of exc_info to string in Python 3.0, 3.1. (I verified it now on all aforesaid Python versions.) – hynekcer Aug 31 '17 at 8:07
39

If you take a look at the implementation of unittest.TestCase.run, you can see that all test results are collected in the result object (typically a unittest.TestResult instance) passed as argument. No result status is left in the unittest.TestCase object.

So there isn't much you can do in the unittest.TestCase.tearDown method unless you mercilessly break the elegant decoupling of test cases and test results with something like this:

import unittest

class MyTest(unittest.TestCase):

    currentResult = None # holds last result object passed to run method

    def setUp(self):
        pass

    def tearDown(self):
        ok = self.currentResult.wasSuccessful()
        errors = self.currentResult.errors
        failures = self.currentResult.failures
        print ' All tests passed so far!' if ok else \
                ' %d errors and %d failures so far' % \
                (len(errors), len(failures))

    def run(self, result=None):
        self.currentResult = result # remember result for use in tearDown
        unittest.TestCase.run(self, result) # call superclass run method

    def test_onePlusOneEqualsTwo(self):
        self.assertTrue(1 + 1 == 2) # succeeds

    def test_onePlusOneEqualsThree(self):
        self.assertTrue(1 + 1 == 3) # fails

    def test_onePlusNoneIsNone(self):
        self.assertTrue(1 + None is None) # raises TypeError

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

EDIT: This works for Python 2.6 - 3.3, (modified for new Python bellow).

  • 1
    This works when running directly, but can cause this with nosetests: stackoverflow.com/questions/11980375/… – Hugo Jun 5 '14 at 6:09
  • Try print(self.currentResult) at the end of tearDown and at the end of run for this code snippet. For tests with F, the failures count increments for print in run but not for tearDown it seems. Was this intended? I would want to know in tearDown if the unit test that is being "tear down" failed or succeeded. – user3290525 Apr 13 '18 at 16:26
37

This solution is for Python versions 2.7 to 3.7 (the highest current version), without any decorators or other modification in any code before tearDown. Everything works according to the builtin classification of results. Also skipped tests or expectedFailure are recognized correctly. It evaluates the result of the current test, not a summary of all tests passed so far. Compatible also with pytest.

import unittest

class MyTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def tearDown(self):
        if hasattr(self, '_outcome'):  # Python 3.4+
            result = self.defaultTestResult()  # these 2 methods have no side effects
            self._feedErrorsToResult(result, self._outcome.errors)
        else:  # Python 3.2 - 3.3 or 3.0 - 3.1 and 2.7
            result = getattr(self, '_outcomeForDoCleanups', self._resultForDoCleanups)
        error = self.list2reason(result.errors)
        failure = self.list2reason(result.failures)
        ok = not error and not failure

        # demo:   report short info immediately (not important)
        if not ok:
            typ, text = ('ERROR', error) if error else ('FAIL', failure)
            msg = [x for x in text.split('\n')[1:] if not x.startswith(' ')][0]
            print("\n%s: %s\n     %s" % (typ, self.id(), msg))

    def list2reason(self, exc_list):
        if exc_list and exc_list[-1][0] is self:
            return exc_list[-1][1]

    # DEMO tests
    def test_success(self):
        self.assertEqual(1, 1)

    def test_fail(self):
        self.assertEqual(2, 1)

    def test_error(self):
        self.assertEqual(1 / 0, 1)

Comments: Only one or zero exceptions (error or failure) need be reported because not more can be expected before tearDown. The package unittest expects that a second exception can be raised by tearDown. Therefore the lists errors and failures can contain only one or zero elements together before tearDown. Lines after "demo" comment are reporting a short result.

Demo output: (not important)

$ python3.5 -m unittest test

EF.
ERROR: test.MyTest.test_error
     ZeroDivisionError: division by zero
FAIL: test.MyTest.test_fail
     AssertionError: 2 != 1

==========================================================
... skipped usual output from unittest with tracebacks ...
...
Ran 3 tests in 0.002s

FAILED (failures=1, errors=1)

Comparision to other solutions - (with respect to commit history of Python source repository):

  • This solution uses a private attribute of TestCase instance like many other solutions, but I checked carefully all relevant commits in the Python source repository that three alternative names cover the code history since Python 2.7 to 3.6.2 without any gap. It can be a problem after some new major Python release, but it could be clearly recognized, skipped and easily fixed later for a new Python. An advantage is that nothing is modified before running tearDown, it should never break the test and all functionality of unittest is supported, works with pytest and it could work many extending packages, but not with nosetest (not a suprise becase nosetest is not compatible e.g. with unittest.expectedFailure).

  • The solutions with decorators on the user test methods or with a customized failureException (mgilson, Pavel Repin 2nd way, kenorb) are robust against future Python versions, but if everything should work completely, they would grow like a snow ball with more supported exceptions and more replicated internals of unittest. The decorated functions have less readable tracebacks (even more levels added by one decorator), they are more complicated for debugging and it is unpleassant if another more important decorator has a problem. (Thanks to mgilson the basic functionality is ready and known issues can be fixed.)

  • The solution with modifired run method and catched result parameter

    • (scoffey) should work also for Python 2.6. The interpretation of results can be improved to requirements of the question, but nothing can work in Python 3.4+, because result is updated after tearDown call, never before.
    • Mark G.: (tested with Python 2.7, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 and with nosetest)
  • solution by exc_info() (Pavel Repin 2st way) works only with Python 2.

  • Other solutions are principially similar, but less complete or with more disadvantages.


Explained by Python source repository
= Lib/unittest/case.py =
Python v 2.7 - 3.3

class TestCase(object):
    ...
    def run(self, result=None):
        ...
        self._outcomeForDoCleanups = result   # Python 3.2, 3.3
        # self._resultForDoCleanups = result  # Python 2.7
        #                                     # Python 2.6 - no result saved
        ...
        try:
            testMethod()
        except...   # many times for different exception classes
            result.add...(self, sys.exc_info())  # _addSkip, addError, addFailure
        ...
        try:
            self.tearDown()
        ...

Python v. 3.4 - 3.6

    def run(self, result=None):
        ...
        # outocome is a context manager to catch and collect different exceptions
        self._outcome = outcome  
        ...
        with outcome...(self):
            testMethod()
        ...
        with outcome...(self): 
            self.tearDown() 
        ... 
        self._feedErrorsToResult(result, outcome.errors)

Note (by reading Python commit messages): A reason why test results are so much decoupled from tests is memory leaks prevention. Every exception info can access to frames of the failed process state including all local variables. If a frame is assigned to a local variable in a code block that could also fail, then a cross memory refence could be easily created. It is not terrible, thanks to garbage collector, but the free memory can became fragmented more quickly than if the memory would be released correctly. This is a reason why exception information and traceback are converted very soon to strings and why temporary objects like self._outcome are encapsulated and are set to None in a finally block in order to memory leaks are prevented.

  • It is the best solution I found so far after 2 days of continuous surfing. – Shantha Dodmane Jan 2 '17 at 17:25
  • 2
    @ShanthaDodmane: Thanks. I found this solution also after 2 days :-) of reading Python git repository, to verify that it is correct, but too late to get any attention here. – hynekcer Jan 2 '17 at 21:57
  • This really ought to be the accepted answer, it's far more complete and accurate. – Topperfalkon Sep 3 '18 at 11:25
  • Note that with pytest --pdb, self._outcome can be None. If you just want to know whether the last test failed, use something like last_test_failed = self._outcome and any(exc_info for test_case, exc_info in self._outcome.errors) – Lekensteyn Jan 3 '19 at 18:20
10

If you are using Python2 you can use the method _resultForDoCleanups. This method return a TextTestResult object:

<unittest.runner.TextTestResult run=1 errors=0 failures=0>

You can use this object to check the result of your tests:

def tearDown(self):
    if self._resultForDoCleanups.failures:
        ...
    elif self._resultForDoCleanups.errors:
        ...
    else:
        #Success

If you are using Python3 you can use _outcomeForDoCleanups:

def tearDown(self):
    if not self._outcomeForDoCleanups.success:
        ...
  • 1
    ._outcomeForDoCleanups has gone in 3.4. there is a thing called ._outcome, but it doesn't seem to expose the test pass/fail state... – hwjp Apr 19 '14 at 22:22
  • 1
    Accessing "private" members is generally frowned upon, and this API can change at any moment. Also: sometimes the failures attribute doesn't appear to be set, causing the tearDown to throw an AttributeError. – Pieter Dec 6 '16 at 12:00
  • 1
    Bingo... this code is specific to unittest. It is NOT compatible with Py.test. – Pieter Dec 6 '16 at 12:31
9

Following on from amatellanes' answer, if you're on Python3.4, you can't use _outcomeForDoCleanups. Here's what I managed to hack together:

def _test_has_failed(self):
    for method, error in self._outcome.errors:
        if error:
            return True
    return False

yucky, but it seems to work.

8

It depends what kind of reporting you'd like to produce.

In case you'd like to do some actions on failure (such as generating a screenshots), instead of using tearDown(), you may achieve that by overriding failureException.

For example:

@property
def failureException(self):
    class MyFailureException(AssertionError):
        def __init__(self_, *args, **kwargs):
            screenshot_dir = 'reports/screenshots'
            if not os.path.exists(screenshot_dir):
                os.makedirs(screenshot_dir)
            self.driver.save_screenshot('{0}/{1}.png'.format(screenshot_dir, self.id()))
            return super(MyFailureException, self_).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
    MyFailureException.__name__ = AssertionError.__name__
    return MyFailureException
  • 1
    This is clever, but I feel like it is a little sketchy. First, failureException should accept an argument (see docs.python.org/2.7/library/…). Second, it is documented to be an Exception whereas you've replaced it with a function. In principle, that should be OK as long as no other code actually relies on the fact that failureException is an exception class (i.e. raise self.failureException will now start failing where it would have succeeded before). – mgilson Aug 30 '17 at 11:26
3

Here's a solution for those of us who are uncomfortable using solutions that rely on unittest internals:

First, we create a decorator that will set a flag on the TestCase instance to determine whether or not the test case failed or passed:

import unittest
import functools

def _tag_error(func):
    """Decorates a unittest test function to add failure information to the TestCase."""

    @functools.wraps(func)
    def decorator(self, *args, **kwargs):
        """Add failure information to `self` when `func` raises an exception."""
        self.test_failed = False
        try:
            func(self, *args, **kwargs)
        except unittest.SkipTest:
            raise
        except Exception:  # pylint: disable=broad-except
            self.test_failed = True
            raise  # re-raise the error with the original traceback.

    return decorator

This decorator is actually pretty simple. It relies on the fact that unittest detects failed tests via Exceptions. As far as I'm aware, the only special exception that needs to be handled is unittest.SkipTest (which does not indicate a test failure). All other exceptions indicate test failures so we mark them as such when they bubble up to us.

We can now use this decorator directly:

class MyTest(unittest.TestCase):
    test_failed = False

    def tearDown(self):
        super(MyTest, self).tearDown()
        print(self.test_failed)

    @_tag_error
    def test_something(self):
        self.fail('Bummer')

It's going to get really annoying writing this decorator all the time. Is there a way we can simplify? Yes there is!* We can write a metaclass to handle applying the decorator for us:

class _TestFailedMeta(type):
    """Metaclass to decorate test methods to append error information to the TestCase instance."""
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        for name, prop in dct.items():
            # assume that TestLoader.testMethodPrefix hasn't been messed with -- otherwise, we're hosed.
            if name.startswith('test') and callable(prop):
                dct[name] = _tag_error(prop)

        return super(_TestFailedMeta, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)

Now we apply this to our base TestCase subclass and we're all set:

import six  # For python2.x/3.x compatibility

class BaseTestCase(six.with_metaclass(_TestFailedMeta, unittest.TestCase)):
    """Base class for all our other tests.

    We don't really need this, but it demonstrates that the
    metaclass gets applied to all subclasses too.
    """


class MyTest(BaseTestCase):

    def tearDown(self):
        super(MyTest, self).tearDown()
        print(self.test_failed)

    def test_something(self):
        self.fail('Bummer')

There are likely a number of cases that this doesn't handle properly. For example, it does not correctly detect failed subtests or expected failures. I'd be interested in other failure modes of this, so if you find a case that I'm not handling properly, let me know in the comments and I'll look into it.


*If there wasn't an easier way, I wouldn't have made _tag_error a private function ;-)

  • Did you tried KeyboardInterrupt exception, expectedFailure decorator and Distinguishing test iterations using subtests? If you don't want to break that, you probably must use more internal names and monkey patch some unittest code. I vote up because basic features of unittest will probably work in every future Python version. Debugging of exceptions is more complicated if they are reraised by decorator. My solution should support every current unittest feature without explicitly enumerate anything. – hynekcer Aug 30 '17 at 13:21
  • @hynekcer -- You're right about KeyboardInterrupt -- I should be except Exception` rather than a bare except. And I agree, this might not work properly with subtests. It also might not work properly with expected failures and a few other cases. However, it does work robustly for a wide range of normal cases. – mgilson Aug 31 '17 at 11:45
  • The only verified problem is expectedFailure decorator that seems very hard to be fixed in your case. Subtests are problematic only with expectedFailure decorator, but relative easy by intercepting expectedFailure. Keyboard interrupt works and the result of test_failed will be anyway never seen after it. I tried your way last year before writing my solution, but I work sometimes on other test decorators and it was terrible to debug them in a combination. On the other hand, it is trivial to verify that a data structure in an undocumented attribute is the same in a new Python. ... – hynekcer Aug 31 '17 at 12:17
  • It works with Python master branch two weeks before Python 3.7 alpha 1. So it has at least two and half year until 3.8 stable. Changes in unittest since 3.5 are minimal. – hynekcer Aug 31 '17 at 12:31
  • @hynekcer -- Yeah, fixing expectedFailure is a bugger without relying on the implementation. If you rely on the implementation, it's as simple as checking func and test-case for a truthy __unittest_expecting_failure__ attribute and not setting the failed flag in that case. But of course, the entire point of the answer was to avoid relying on these implementation details :-) – mgilson Aug 31 '17 at 13:06
1

Python 2.7.

You can also get result after unittest.main():

t = unittest.main(exit=False)
print t.result

or use suite:

suite.addTests(tests)
result = unittest.result.TestResult()
suite.run(result)
print result
1

Name of current test can be retrieved with unittest.TestCase.id() method. So in tearDown you can check self.id().

Example shows how to:

  • find if current test has error or failure in errors or failures list
  • print test id with PASS or FAIL or EXCEPTION

Tested example here works with @scoffey 's nice example.

def tearDown(self):
    result = "PASS"
    #### find and show result for current test
    # I did not find any nicer/neater way of comparing self.id() with test id stored in errors or failures lists :-7
    id = str(self.id()).split('.')[-1]
    # id() e.g. tup[0]:<__main__.MyTest testMethod=test_onePlusNoneIsNone>
    #           str(tup[0]):"test_onePlusOneEqualsThree (__main__.MyTest)"
    #           str(self.id()) = __main__.MyTest.test_onePlusNoneIsNone
    for tup in self.currentResult.failures:
        if str(tup[0]).startswith(id):
            print ' test %s failure:%s' % (self.id(), tup[1])
            ## DO TEST FAIL ACTION HERE
            result = "FAIL"
    for tup in self.currentResult.errors:
        if str(tup[0]).startswith(id):
            print ' test %s error:%s' % (self.id(), tup[1])
            ## DO TEST EXCEPTION ACTION HERE
            result = "EXCEPTION"

    print "Test:%s Result:%s" % (self.id(), result)

example of result:

python run_scripts/tut2.py 2>&1 
E test __main__.MyTest.test_onePlusNoneIsNone error:Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "run_scripts/tut2.py", line 80, in test_onePlusNoneIsNone
    self.assertTrue(1 + None is None) # raises TypeError
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'NoneType'

Test:__main__.MyTest.test_onePlusNoneIsNone Result:EXCEPTION
F test __main__.MyTest.test_onePlusOneEqualsThree failure:Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "run_scripts/tut2.py", line 77, in test_onePlusOneEqualsThree
    self.assertTrue(1 + 1 == 3) # fails
AssertionError: False is not true

Test:__main__.MyTest.test_onePlusOneEqualsThree Result:FAIL
Test:__main__.MyTest.test_onePlusOneEqualsTwo Result:PASS
.
======================================================================
ERROR: test_onePlusNoneIsNone (__main__.MyTest)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "run_scripts/tut2.py", line 80, in test_onePlusNoneIsNone
    self.assertTrue(1 + None is None) # raises TypeError
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'NoneType'

======================================================================
FAIL: test_onePlusOneEqualsThree (__main__.MyTest)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "run_scripts/tut2.py", line 77, in test_onePlusOneEqualsThree
     self.assertTrue(1 + 1 == 3) # fails
AssertionError: False is not true

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 3 tests in 0.001s

FAILED (failures=1, errors=1)
1

Inspired by scoffey’s answer, I decided to take mercilessnes to the next level, and have come up with the following.

It works in both vanilla unittest, and also when run via nosetests, and also works in Python versions 2.7, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4 (I did not specifically test 3.0, 3.1, or 3.5, as I don’t have these installed at the moment, but if I read the source code correctly, it should work in 3.5 as well):

#! /usr/bin/env python

from __future__ import unicode_literals
import logging
import os
import sys
import unittest


# Log file to see squawks during testing
formatter = logging.Formatter(fmt='%(levelname)-8s %(name)s: %(message)s')
log_file = os.path.splitext(os.path.abspath(__file__))[0] + '.log'
handler = logging.FileHandler(log_file)
handler.setFormatter(formatter)
logging.root.addHandler(handler)
logging.root.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
log = logging.getLogger(__name__)


PY = tuple(sys.version_info)[:3]


class SmartTestCase(unittest.TestCase):

    """Knows its state (pass/fail/error) by the time its tearDown is called."""

    def run(self, result):
        # Store the result on the class so tearDown can behave appropriately
        self.result = result.result if hasattr(result, 'result') else result
        if PY >= (3, 4, 0):
            self._feedErrorsToResultEarly = self._feedErrorsToResult
            self._feedErrorsToResult = lambda *args, **kwargs: None  # no-op
        super(SmartTestCase, self).run(result)

    @property
    def errored(self):
        if (3, 0, 0) <= PY < (3, 4, 0):
            return bool(self._outcomeForDoCleanups.errors)
        return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.errors]

    @property
    def failed(self):
        if (3, 0, 0) <= PY < (3, 4, 0):
            return bool(self._outcomeForDoCleanups.failures)
        return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.failures]

    @property
    def passed(self):
        return not (self.errored or self.failed)

    def tearDown(self):
        if PY >= (3, 4, 0):
            self._feedErrorsToResultEarly(self.result, self._outcome.errors)


class TestClass(SmartTestCase):

    def test_1(self):
        self.assertTrue(True)

    def test_2(self):
        self.assertFalse(True)

    def test_3(self):
        self.assertFalse(False)

    def test_4(self):
        self.assertTrue(False)

    def test_5(self):
        self.assertHerp('Derp')

    def tearDown(self):
        super(TestClass, self).tearDown()
        log.critical('---- RUNNING {} ... -----'.format(self.id()))
        if self.errored:
            log.critical('----- ERRORED -----')
        elif self.failed:
            log.critical('----- FAILED -----')
        else:
            log.critical('----- PASSED -----')


if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

When run with unittest:

$ ./test.py -v
test_1 (__main__.TestClass) ... ok
test_2 (__main__.TestClass) ... FAIL
test_3 (__main__.TestClass) ... ok
test_4 (__main__.TestClass) ... FAIL
test_5 (__main__.TestClass) ... ERROR
[…]

$ cat ./test.log
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_1 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_2 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- FAILED -----
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_3 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_4 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- FAILED -----
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_5 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- ERRORED -----

When run with nosetests:

$ nosetests ./test.py -v
test_1 (test.TestClass) ... ok
test_2 (test.TestClass) ... FAIL
test_3 (test.TestClass) ... ok
test_4 (test.TestClass) ... FAIL
test_5 (test.TestClass) ... ERROR

$ cat ./test.log
CRITICAL test: ---- RUNNING test.TestClass.test_1 ... -----
CRITICAL test: ----- PASSED -----
CRITICAL test: ---- RUNNING test.TestClass.test_2 ... -----
CRITICAL test: ----- FAILED -----
CRITICAL test: ---- RUNNING test.TestClass.test_3 ... -----
CRITICAL test: ----- PASSED -----
CRITICAL test: ---- RUNNING test.TestClass.test_4 ... -----
CRITICAL test: ----- FAILED -----
CRITICAL test: ---- RUNNING test.TestClass.test_5 ... -----
CRITICAL test: ----- ERRORED -----

Background

I started with this:

class SmartTestCase(unittest.TestCase):

    """Knows its state (pass/fail/error) by the time its tearDown is called."""

    def run(self, result):
        # Store the result on the class so tearDown can behave appropriately
        self.result = result.result if hasattr(result, 'result') else result
        super(SmartTestCase, self).run(result)

    @property
    def errored(self):
        return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.errors]

    @property
    def failed(self):
        return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.failures]

    @property
    def passed(self):
        return not (self.errored or self.failed)

However, this only works in Python 2. In Python 3, up to and including 3.3, the control flow appears to have changed a bit: Python 3’s unittest package processes results after calling each test’s tearDown() method… this behavior can be confirmed if we simply add an extra line (or six) to our test class:

@@ -63,6 +63,12 @@
             log.critical('----- FAILED -----')
         else:
             log.critical('----- PASSED -----')
+        log.warning(
+            'ERRORS THUS FAR:\n'
+            + '\n'.join(tc.id() for tc, _ in self.result.errors))
+        log.warning(
+            'FAILURES THUS FAR:\n'
+            + '\n'.join(tc.id() for tc, _ in self.result.failures))


 if __name__ == '__main__':

Then just re-run the tests:

$ python3.3 ./test.py -v
test_1 (__main__.TestClass) ... ok
test_2 (__main__.TestClass) ... FAIL
test_3 (__main__.TestClass) ... ok
test_4 (__main__.TestClass) ... FAIL
test_5 (__main__.TestClass) ... ERROR
[…]

…and you will see that you get this as a result:

CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_1 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:

CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_2 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:

CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_3 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_4 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_5 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
__main__.TestClass.test_4

Now, compare the above to Python 2’s output:

CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_1 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:

CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_2 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- FAILED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_3 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- PASSED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_4 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- FAILED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:

WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
__main__.TestClass.test_4
CRITICAL __main__: ---- RUNNING __main__.TestClass.test_5 ... -----
CRITICAL __main__: ----- ERRORED -----
WARNING  __main__: ERRORS THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_5
WARNING  __main__: FAILURES THUS FAR:
__main__.TestClass.test_2
__main__.TestClass.test_4

Since Python 3 processes errors/failures after the test is torn down, we can’t readily infer the result of a test using result.errors or result.failures in every case. (I think it probably makes more sense architecturally to process a test’s results after tearing it down, however, it does make the perfectly valid use-case of following a different end-of-test procedure depending on a test’s pass/fail status a bit harder to meet…)

Therefore, instead of relying on the overall result object, instead we can reference _outcomeForDoCleanups as others have already mentioned, which contains the result object for the currently running test, and has the necessary errors and failrues attributes, which we can use to infer a test’s status by the time tearDown() has been called:

@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@
 from __future__ import unicode_literals
 import logging
 import os
+import sys
 import unittest


@@ -16,6 +17,9 @@
 log = logging.getLogger(__name__)


+PY = tuple(sys.version_info)[:3]
+
+
 class SmartTestCase(unittest.TestCase):

     """Knows its state (pass/fail/error) by the time its tearDown is called."""
@@ -27,10 +31,14 @@

     @property
     def errored(self):
+        if PY >= (3, 0, 0):
+            return bool(self._outcomeForDoCleanups.errors)
         return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.errors]

     @property
     def failed(self):
+        if PY >= (3, 0, 0):
+            return bool(self._outcomeForDoCleanups.failures)
         return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.failures]

     @property

This adds support for the early versions of Python 3.

As of Python 3.4, however, this private member variable no longer exists, and instead, a new (albeit also private) method was added: _feedErrorsToResult.

This means that for versions 3.4 (and later), if the need is great enough, one can — very hackishlyforce one’s way in to make it all work again like it did in version 2…

@@ -27,17 +27,20 @@
     def run(self, result):
         # Store the result on the class so tearDown can behave appropriately
         self.result = result.result if hasattr(result, 'result') else result
+        if PY >= (3, 4, 0):
+            self._feedErrorsToResultEarly = self._feedErrorsToResult
+            self._feedErrorsToResult = lambda *args, **kwargs: None  # no-op
         super(SmartTestCase, self).run(result)

     @property
     def errored(self):
-        if PY >= (3, 0, 0):
+        if (3, 0, 0) <= PY < (3, 4, 0):
             return bool(self._outcomeForDoCleanups.errors)
         return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.errors]

     @property
     def failed(self):
-        if PY >= (3, 0, 0):
+        if (3, 0, 0) <= PY < (3, 4, 0):
             return bool(self._outcomeForDoCleanups.failures)
         return self.id() in [case.id() for case, _ in self.result.failures]

@@ -45,6 +48,10 @@
     def passed(self):
         return not (self.errored or self.failed)

+    def tearDown(self):
+        if PY >= (3, 4, 0):
+            self._feedErrorsToResultEarly(self.result, self._outcome.errors)
+

 class TestClass(SmartTestCase):

@@ -64,6 +71,7 @@
         self.assertHerp('Derp')

     def tearDown(self):
+        super(TestClass, self).tearDown()
         log.critical('---- RUNNING {} ... -----'.format(self.id()))
         if self.errored:
             log.critical('----- ERRORED -----')

…provided, of course, all consumers of this class remember to super(…, self).tearDown() in their respective tearDown methods…

Disclaimer: Purely educational, don’t try this at home, etc. etc. etc. I’m not particularly proud of this solution, but it seems to work well enough for the time being, and is the best I could hack up after fiddling for an hour or two on a Saturday afternoon…

  • 1
    +1 but: You should not add to the object self.result directly, otherwise you get the failures from test methods reported twice or you lose eventually errors from tearDown if something goes wrong. A new temporary result object only for the errors from the test method is a solution. (I did not see this end of screen, until I began to write an answer.) – hynekcer Sep 21 '16 at 1:21
0

Tested for python 3.7 - sample code for getting info of failing assertion but can give idea how to deal with errors:

def tearDown(self):
    if self._outcome.errors[1][1] and hasattr(self._outcome.errors[1][1][1], 'actual'):
        print(self._testMethodName)
        print(self._outcome.errors[1][1][1].actual)
        print(self._outcome.errors[1][1][1].expected)
0

In few words, this gives True if all test run so far exited with no errors or failures:

class WatheverTestCase(TestCase):

    def tear_down(self):
        return not self._outcome.result.errors and not self._outcome.result.failures

Explore _outcome's properties to access more detailed possibilities.

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