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[There is a similar question Shared ownership of IDisposable objects in C# but the accepted answer suffers from similar design problems which my solution has]

I have been trying to think around this problem having seen many designs taking a blind leap of faith in garbage collector when working in c#. Reason being many times its easy to ignore that one need to handle the IDisposable rather carefully making them close equivalent of resource allocation in c++. I understand that pedantically speaking Dispose is not the equivalent of c++ destructor but if you are holding on to native resources which needs to be cleaned in a deterministic manner it becomes very similar.

But if the object is shared by multiple resources (for eg. an HttpClient object which is meant to be created and used concurrently for performance), who owns the responsibility of calling Dispose since there is no single owner? To solve this problem I came up with a SharedOwner library which has a similar interface as shared_ptr.

Code snippet:

SharedOwner:

public static SharedHandle<T> MakeSharedHandle(Func<T> createSharedOwner)
{
    var obj = new SharedHandle<T>(createSharedOwner());
    return obj;
}

public SharedHandle(T obj)
{
    AddReference();
    m_object = obj;
}

public Handle<T> GetHandle()
{
    AddReference();
    return new Handle<T>(this);
}

internal void Decrement()
{
    if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref m_refCounter) == 0)
    {
        m_object.Dispose();
        m_object = default(T);
    }
}

internal T GetInternalHandler() { return m_object; }

private void AddReference()
{
    Interlocked.Increment(ref m_refCounter);
}

~SharedHandle()
{
    m_object.Dispose();
}

Handle

is a transparent wrapper that manages the ref counting calls keeping that abstracted from consumers.

public sealed class Handle<T> : IDisposable where T : IDisposable
    {
        private SharedHandle<T> m_handle;
        bool disposed = false;
        internal Handle(SharedHandle<T> handle) { m_handle = handle; }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if (!disposed)
            {
                m_handle.Decrement();
                GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
                disposed = true;
            }
        }

        ~Handle()
        {
            if (!disposed)
            {
                m_handle.Decrement();
            }
        }

The typical usage pattern that I imagined would be:

using (var sharedClient = this.m_sharedClient.GetHandle()) // m_sharedClient is the SharedHandle passed
{
     var httpClient = (HttpClient)sharedClient;
     // use httpClient
}

Now I see two issues with this approach which deviate it from the original motivation of simulating shared_ptr behavior:

  • The first reference is held by SharedHandle itself. So even when all Handles are out of scope one reference would still be held by SharedHandle thereby making the if block in Decrement unreachable.

  • The final Dispose happens when the SharedHandle dies which in lot of sense is no better than not calling Dispose on the underlying object itself. Hence making the solution much less valuable.

I am thinking of moving the reference counting to Handle and using SharedHandle as the control block in shared_ptr but then that means that one may end up with a valid SharedHandle object holding on to a Disposed internal object.

Another alternative that I can think of is making SharedHandle derive from IDisposable and just call Decrement in Dispose. But then this brings other set of design issues. Is there anything that can be done to solve this problem in a more elegant way?

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  • You do know that the GC never calls Dispose()? It could be called by a finalizer, but you never know when, or if, they get called. Bottom-line - you must ensure that it is explicitly called. May 24, 2017 at 4:49
  • 1
    The correct design with any IDisposable is to never share them. Why do you think you need to? What's your underlying design. May 24, 2017 at 4:50
  • @Enigmativity I am aware that GC and Dispose are orthogonal. The motivation came from this gist.github.com/JonCole/… ConnectionMultiplexer objects can and should be reused for performance. Now any component that needs to talk to the redis cache will in some form hold on the shared connection multiplexer.
    – bashrc
    May 24, 2017 at 4:57
  • Quote: "Users of the ConnectionMultiplexer MUST handle ObjectDisposedExceptions". This library requires a ten foot pole, start by never calling Dispose() and keeping your fingers crossed, you'll probably be okay. May 24, 2017 at 10:33
  • 1
    So maybe instead use a pool of connections and manage them in a pool object, "loaning" connections to other classes and managing if the connection is checked out or back to the pool. That way you can totally control calling dispose when you feel is necessary. May 25, 2017 at 5:48

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