I'm trying to read the names of shared libraries used in binaries, using the C language. So far, I have the following program in test.c:

#include <string.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <elf.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    const char *ls = NULL;
    int fd = -1;
    struct stat stat = {0};

    if (argc != 2) {
      printf("Missing arg\n");
      return 0;
    }

    // open the file in readonly mode
    fd = open(argv[1], O_RDONLY);
    if (fd < 0) {
        perror("open");
        goto cleanup;
    }

    // get the file size
    if (fstat(fd, &stat) != 0) {
        perror("stat");
        goto cleanup;
    }

    // put the file in memory
    ls = mmap(NULL, stat.st_size, PROT_READ, MAP_PRIVATE, fd, 0);
    if (ls == MAP_FAILED) {
        perror("mmap");
        goto cleanup;
    }

    Elf64_Ehdr *eh = (Elf64_Ehdr *)ls;
    // looking for the PT_DYNAMIC segment
    for (int i = 0; i < eh->e_phnum; i++) {
        Elf64_Phdr *ph = (Elf64_Phdr *)((char *)ls + (eh->e_phoff + eh->e_phentsize * i));
        const char *strtab = NULL;
        if (ph->p_type == PT_DYNAMIC) {
            const Elf64_Dyn *dtag_table = (const Elf64_Dyn *)(ls + ph->p_offset);

            // looking for the string table
            for (int j = 0; 1; j++) {
                // the end of the dtag table is marked by DT_NULL
                if (dtag_table[j].d_tag == DT_NULL) {
                    break;
                }

                if (dtag_table[j].d_tag == DT_STRTAB) {
                  strtab = (const char *)dtag_table[j].d_un.d_ptr;
                  printf("string table addr: %p\n", strtab);
                }
            }

            // no string table ? we're stuck, bail out
            if (strtab == NULL) {
              printf("no strtab, abort\n");
              break;
            }

            // now, i print shared libraries
            for (int j = 0; 1; j++) {
                // the end of the dtag table is marked by DT_NULL
                if (dtag_table[j].d_tag == DT_NULL) {
                    break;
                }

                if (dtag_table[j].d_tag == DT_NEEDED) {
                  printf("too long: %d\n", &strtab[dtag_table[j].d_un.d_val] >= ls + stat.st_size);
                  printf("string offset in strtab: %lu\n", dtag_table[j].d_un.d_val);
                  printf("string from strtab: %s\n", &strtab[dtag_table[j].d_un.d_val]);
                }
            }

            // only go through the PT_DYNAMIC segment we found,
            // other segments dont matter
            break;
        }
    }

    // cleanup memory
    cleanup:
    if (fd != -1) {
        close(fd);
    }
    if (ls != MAP_FAILED) {
        munmap((void *)ls, stat.st_size);
    }

    return 0;
}

I compile it with:

gcc -g -Wall -Wextra test.c

When I run ./a.out a.out (so reading the shared libraries of itself), it seems to work fine, I get the following output:

string table addr: 0x4003d8
too long: 0
string offset in strtab: 1
string from strtab: libc.so.6

However, when I run it against system binaries, like /bin/ls, with ./a.out /bin/ls, then I get a segfault at line 78.

string table addr: 0x401030
too long: 0
string offset in strtab: 1
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

I don't know why. Reading the /bin/ls with readelf, the adresses I use seem right and the string offset seems right too:

$ readelf -a /bin/ls | grep dynstr
...
[ 6] .dynstr           STRTAB           0000000000401030  00001030
...

$ readelf -p .dynstr /bin/ls
String dump of section '.dynstr':
  [     1]  libselinux.so.1
  ...

What am I doing wrong?

  • And if you run in a debugger, what are the values of all involved variables when the crash happens? Do they look valid? – Some programmer dude May 24 '17 at 6:54
  • Are you sure that what start at &strtab[dtag_table[j].d_un.d_val] is a nul-terminated string? – LPs May 24 '17 at 6:55
  • Use valgrind to find your memory issue – Ôrel May 24 '17 at 6:59
  • Try commenting in english, otherwise your comments will often be useless for everyone but you – Badda May 24 '17 at 6:59
  • I've updated the comments to English. @Someprogrammerdude The variables look valid to me, yes. But I must have missed something. @LPs it should be, the strtab is supposed to be a series of null-terminated strings according to the ELF spec. I'm assuming that the system's /bin/ls conforms to the spec. @Ôrel I've tried that, it says the error is at line 78, more precisely within the call to printf. – conradkdotcom May 24 '17 at 7:08
up vote 1 down vote accepted

What am I doing wrong?

For a non-PIE binary, this:

strtab = (const char *)dtag_table[j].d_un.d_ptr;

points to where the .dynstr would have been if that binary was actually running in current process.

If the binary is not running, you need to relocate this value by $where_mmaped - $load_addr. The $where_mmaped is your ls variable. The $load_addr is the address where the binary was statically linked to load (usually it's the p_vaddr of the first PT_LOAD segment; for x86_64 binary the typical value is 0x400000).

You'll note that this neatly explains why ./a.out a.out works: you read .dynstr from your own address space, while using a.out to figure out correct offsets.

  • Thanks a lot, two answers within 2 days ! – conradkdotcom May 25 '17 at 10:05
  • From what I understand, this works because PT_LOAD's p_offset is 0. To make the program more reliable, I suppose one would have to take p_offset into account, resulting in something like strtab = ls + load_offset + (strtab_addr - load_addr). Is that assumption correct? – conradkdotcom May 25 '17 at 12:39

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