20

I am trying to get the number of days difference in Windows powershell, I am extracting the last date of the year i.e.. 20171231(yyyyMMdd) from a text file that I have locally stored the date in that file.

Here is the below code that I am trying but not able to get the difference of the days, am getting the wrong output by directly subtracting, if am converting the string extracted from the file and then subtract it with the date type, even then am getting the wrong output.

$DateStr = (Get-Date).ToString("yyyyMMdd")

$content = Get-Content C:\Users\Date.txt 

$diff = $content.ToString();

#Convert it to the date type
$diff = [datetime]::parseexact($diff, 'yyyyMMdd', $null)

#$diff3 = $diff - $DateStr
41

Use New-TimeSpan as it represents a time interval. Like so,

$d1 = '2017-01-01'
$d2 = '2017-05-01'
$ts = New-TimeSpan -Start $d1 -End $d2
$ts.Days # Check results
120
1
  • 6
    (New-TimeSpan -Start '2017-01-01' -End '2017-05-01').Days (just to have here in form of one expression)
    – Nashev
    May 15 '18 at 15:55
3

A quick, dirty, one line powershell script to get the difference between current date and any future date:

[math]::Ceiling((([DateTime]'mm-dd-yyyy')-(Get-Date)).TotalDays)
2

$DateStr is going to be a string, so it can't be parsed as a date. You can also use new-timespan to get the difference between two dates.

$Date = Get-Date

$diff = Get-Content C:\Users\Date.txt -raw

#Convert it to the date type
$diff = [datetime]::parseexact($diff, 'yyyyMMdd', $null)

$diff3 = New-TimeSpan -Start $diff -end $Date

#Number of days
$diff3.days
1

Great answers by others but I often use Date-Diff function (it's powerful and well known to developers). See example below:

Using Namespace Microsoft.VisualBasic
Add-Type  -AssemblyName  Microsoft.VisualBasic
$beg = Get-Date '2019-01-01'
$end = Get-Date
[DateAndTime]::DateDiff([DateInterval]::Day, $beg, $end)

HTH

0
$Date = Get-Date

$diff = Get-Content C:\Users\Date.txt -raw

#Convert it to the date type
$diff = [datetime]::parseexact($diff, 'yyyyMMdd', $null)

#simply difference between dates give you a timespan, take days
($diff - $Date).Day
0
0

If you convert to datetime objects it's pretty straighforward to subtract them and look at the days property. This works with times too.

[datetime]'9/3' - [datetime]'9/1' | % days

2


[datetime]'10:30' - [datetime]'9:30' | % hours

1

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