In my .NET Core application, I have a decorator class that I hoped would be able to handle transactions by wrapping the execution of database commands in a TransactionScope. Unfortunately, it appears that support for TransactionScope isn't going to make it into SqlConnection by the release of .NET Core 2: https://github.com/dotnet/corefx/issues/19708:

In the absence of TransactionScope, I'm not sure of the best approach to this problem. With TransactionScope, my transaction decorator looks like this:

public class TransactionCommandHandlerDecorator<TCommand> : ICommandHandler<TCommand>
{
    private readonly ICommandHandler<TCommand> decorated;

    //constructor        

    public void Handle(TCommand command)
    {  
       using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
       {
           this.decorated.Handle(command);

           scope.Complete();
       }
    }
}

Currently, each implementation of ICommandHandler gets an instance of my DapperContext class and handles commands like this:

public void Handle(UpdateEntity command)
    {
        var sql = Resources.UpdateEntityPart1;

        this.context.Execute(sql, new
        {
           id = command.Id;             
        });

        var sql = Resources.UpdateEntityPart2;

        //call Execute again
    }

The DapperContext class has a connection factory to provide new connections for each call to its Execute method. Because the command handler may have to to perform multiple database writes for a single TCommand, I need the ability to rollback when something fails. Having to create transactions at the same time that I create connections (in DapperContext) means I have no way to guarantee transactional behavior across connections.

The one alternative I've considered doesn't seem all that satisfying:

  1. Manage connections and transactions at the command handler level, then pass that information to the dapper context. That way all queries for a given command use the same connection and transaction. This might work, but I don't like the idea of burdening my command handlers with this responsibility. In terms of overall design, it seems more natural that the DapperContext be the place to worry about having a connection.

My question, then: Is there any way to write a transaction decorator without the use of TransactionScope, given the current limitations of SqlConnection in .NET Core? If not, what's the next best solution that doesn't violate the principle of single responsibility too egregiously?

  • 2
    If I was you, I would comment to that particular Girhub issue to explain Microsoft that this is a major incompatibility and absolutely should be fixed. I think this is a major problem for many organizations migrating if TransactionScope doesn't work in Core 2. – Steven May 25 '17 at 21:19
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A solution could be to create a SqlTransaction as part of the decorator, and store it in some sort of ThreadLocal or AsyncLocal field, so it is available for other parts of the business transaction, even though it is not explicitly passed on. This is effectively what TransactionScope does under the cover (but more elegantly).

As example, take a look at this pseudo code:

public class TransactionCommandHandlerDecorator<TCommand>
    : ICommandHandler<TCommand>
{
    private readonly ICommandHandler<TCommand> decorated;
    private readonly AsyncLocal<SqlTransaction> transaction;

    public void Handle(TCommand command)
    {
        transaction.Value = BeginTranscation();

       try
       {
            this.decorated.Handle(command);

            transaction.Value.Commit();
       }
       finally
       {
           transaction.Value.Dispose();
           transaction.Value = null;
       }
   }
}

With an abstraction that handlers can use:

public interface ITransactionContainer
{
    SqlTransaction CurrentTransaction { get; }
}


public void Handle(UpdateEntity command)
{
    // Get current transaction
    var transaction = this.transactionContainer.CurrentTransaction;

    var sql = Resources.UpdateEntityPart1;

    // Pass the transaction on to the Execute 
    // (or hide it inside the execute would be even better)
    this.context.Execute(sql, transaction, new
    {
       id = command.Id;             
    });

    var sql = Resources.UpdateEntityPart2;

    //call Execute again
}

An implementation for ITransactionContainer could look something like this:

public class AsyncTransactionContainer : ITransactionContainer
{
    private readonly AsyncLocal<SqlTransaction> transaction;

    public AsyncTransactionContainer(AsyncLocal<SqlTransaction> transaction)
    {
        this.transaction = transaction;
    }

    public SqlTransaction CurrentTransaction =>
        this.transaction.Value
            ?? throw new InvalidOperationException("No transaction.");
}

Both the AsyncTransactionContainer and TransactionCommandHandlerDecorator depend on an AsyncLocal<SqlTransaction>. This should be a singleton (the same instance should be injected into both).

  • Appreciate the advice, Steven. I'm not able to test this at the moment, but I'm wondering if this will require me to keep the same SqlConnection instance across multiple calls to Execute. Since SqlTransaction is linked to a specific connection, I'm not sure what will happen if I try to call Dapper with CurrentTransaction but from a newly created connection. – Matt May 26 '17 at 14:27
  • This does mean reusing the same SqlConnection. The connection needs to be opened /closed as well inside the decorator. – Steven May 26 '17 at 15:23
  • Two more questions if you will: Is there any reason not to add a setter to the transaction container so that the decorator can rely on an interface as well? Think that would make unit testing easier.. Also, is Singleton necessary in this case? Wouldn't multiple instances (using AsyncScoped lifestyle, for example) of AsyncLocal function the same way, since instances only read from and write to the ExecutionContext from which they are called? Btw, for anyone else reading this, the commandhandler/decorator structure I'm using came from Steven's website. – Matt May 30 '17 at 20:45

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.