I want to have a sorted set by age;

The method compareTo() in this case works fine but the problem is that remove() and contians() methods returns always false;

INTERESTING: In case I uncomment the lines form compareTo() method, remove() and contains() methods works fine; but I want to use the other field as sorting.

Does someone have any idea why does not work properly; Found old Hibernate issue: https://hibernate.atlassian.net/browse/HHH-2634; is this already fixed?

Bellow are the used classes:

@Entity(name = "CAMPAIGN")
public class Campaign implements Identifiable, Serializable {
    public static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    @Column(name = "ID")
    private Long id;


    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "campaign", cascade = CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, orphanRemoval = true)
    @OrderBy("age ASC")
    private SortedSet<MailingAddress> mailingAddresses = new TreeSet<>();

    ...

    public void removeMailingAddress(MailingAddress mailingAddress) {
        this.mailingAddresses.remove(mailingAddress);
        //this.mailingAddresses.contains(mailingAddress);

        mailingAddress.setCampaign(null);
    }
}

And

@Entity(name = "MAILING_ADDRESS")
public class MailingAddress implements Identifiable, Comparable, Serializable {
    public static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    @Column(name = "ID")
    private Long id;

    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name = "CAMPAIGN_ID")
    private Campaign campaign;

    @Column(name = "AGE")
    private Integer age;

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Object o) {
        if (o == null) {
            return 1;
        }

        if (!(o instanceof MailingAddress)) {
            throw new ClassCastException("Cannot compare MailingAddress with " + o.getClass());
        }

        MailingAddress o1 = (MailingAddress) o;
        int comparison;

        // comparison for id
        /*comparison = compareFields(this.id, o1.id);
        if (comparison != 0) {
            return comparison;
        }*/

        // comparison for ageBand
        comparison = compareFields(this.age, o1.age);
        if (comparison != 0) {
            return comparison;
        }

        return 0;
    }

    private int compareFields(Comparable field1, Comparable field2) {
        if (field1 == null && field2 == null) {
            return 0;
        } else if (field1 == null && field2 != null) {
            return -1;
        } else if (field1 != null && field2 == null) {
            return 1;
        }
        return field1.compareTo(field2);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        return this.compareTo(o) == 0;
    }

}

UPDATE:

Found that using SortedSet as interface for TreeSet in combination with Hibernate the methods remove() and contains() does not work properly. "SortedSet mailingAddresses = new TreeSet<>();"

Changed the definition to "Set mailingAddresses = new TreeSet<>();" and the methods remove() and contains() works fine; Also the sorting that is using compareTo() is working also for other fields than id.

Probably there is a bug in combination of TreeSet, SortedSet and Hibernate. If someone found an explanation for this "bug" please let me know.

Here is a working version:

@Entity
public class MailingAddress implements Identifiable, Comparable, Serializable {
    public static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    @Column(name = "ID")
    private Long id;

    private Integer age;

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Object o) {
        if (o == null) {
            return 1;
        }

        if (!(o instanceof MailingAddress)) {
            throw new ClassCastException("Cannot compare MailingAddress with " + o.getClass());
        }

        MailingAddress o1 = (MailingAddress) o;
        int comparison = compareFields(this.age, o1.age);
        if (comparison != 0) {
            return comparison;
        }

        return 0;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) return false;

        MailingAddress that = (MailingAddress) o;

        if (id != null ? !id.equals(that.id) : that.id != null) return false;
        return age != null ? age.equals(that.age) : that.age == null;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return 31;
    }

    private int compareFields(Comparable field1, Comparable field2) {
        if (field1 == null && field2 == null) {
            return 0;
        } else if (field1 == null && field2 != null) {
            return -1;
        } else if (field1 != null && field2 == null) {
            return 1;
        }
        return field1.compareTo(field2);
    }
}

AND

@Entity
public class Campaign implements Identifiable, Serializable {
    public static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    @Column(name = "ID")
    private Long id;


    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "campaign", cascade = CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, orphanRemoval = true)
    @OrderBy("age ASC")
    private Set<MailingAddress> mailingAddresses = new TreeSet<>();

    ...
}
  • Your code would be so much cleaner and less open to bugs if you stopped using raw types. – Lew Bloch May 24 '17 at 18:58
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem here is that you override equals without overriding hashCode. As explained in this article, you need to provide both. Also, the reference check does not work for the merge entity state transition.

Since you don't have a natural business key in MailingAddress, you need to use the entity identifier like this:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if (this == o) return true;
    if (!(o instanceof MailingAddress)) return false;
    MailingAddress ma = (MailingAddress) o;
    return getId() != null && Objects.equals(getId(), ma.getId());
}

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return 31;
}

Check this article to understand why hashCode needs to return a constant value in this case.

But, that's not all.

Why do you use a TreeSet with @OrderBy("age ASC"). The order is given at query-time, and then you override that in Java. Since you use @OrderBy, it makes more sense to use a List since the sorting is done when executing the SELECT statement.

  • @ Vlad Mihalcea, Thank you for answer! I've enhanced the code based on your advice(initially I had equals() and hashCode(), but I some people advised to remove them in case of TreeSet, that is using Comparable), but the issue in case of TreeSet is not resolved. I've tested for HashSet and is working fine. – Linu Radu May 24 '17 at 21:04
  • regarding using a list indeed is more clean that solution; I'm using Set usually because as I understood is more safe vladmihalcea.com/2013/10/16/… – Linu Radu May 24 '17 at 21:23
  • That article says that HHH-5855 was fixed in 5.0.8. Lists are fine now. – Vlad Mihalcea May 24 '17 at 21:25
  • other benefits of TreeSet is that also the inserted elements are properly sorted – Linu Radu May 24 '17 at 21:52

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