14

Initially, I have a class to store some processed values and re-use those with its other methods.

The problem is when i tried to divide the class method into multiple process to speed up, python spawned processes but it seems didn't work (as I saw in Task Manager that only 1 process was running) and result is never delivered.

I did couple of search and found that pathos.multiprocessing can do this instead but I wonder if standard library can solve this problems?

from multiprocessing import Pool

class A():
    def __init__(self, vl):
        self.vl = vl
    def cal(self, nb):
        return nb * self.vl
    def run(self, dt):
        t = Pool(processes=4)
        rs = t.map(self.cal, dt)
        t.close()
        return t

a = A(2)

a.run(list(range(10)))
3
  • 3
    Use an if __name__ == '__main__' guard. Commented May 25, 2017 at 16:52
  • this doesn't seem like it needs multiprocessing at all. are you using much bigger data or something? or a different method? the overhead of spawning a process to execute one multiplication is just not worth it.
    – acushner
    Commented May 25, 2017 at 16:57
  • A similar question came up awhile ago with joblib; it would be faster to use numpy because of the effort in copying and context-switching for a new process. stackoverflow.com/questions/44084513/… Commented May 25, 2017 at 16:58

2 Answers 2

19

Your code fails as it cannot pickle the instance method (self.cal), which is what Python attempts to do when you're spawning multiple processes by mapping them to multiprocessing.Pool (well, there is a way to do it, but it's way too convoluted and not extremely useful anyway) - since there is no shared memory access it has to 'pack' the data and send it to the spawned process for unpacking. The same would happen to you if you tried to pickle the a instance.

The only shared memory access available in the multiprocessing package is a little known multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool so if you really want to do this:

from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool

class A():
    def __init__(self, vl):
        self.vl = vl
    def cal(self, nb):
        return nb * self.vl
    def run(self, dt):
        t = ThreadPool(processes=4)
        rs = t.map(self.cal, dt)
        t.close()
        return rs

a = A(2)
print(a.run(list(range(10))))
# prints: [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18]

But this will not give you parallelization as it essentially maps to your regular threads which do have access to the shared memory. You should pass class/static methods instead (if you need them called) accompanied with the data you want them to work with (in your case self.vl). If you need to share that data across processes you'll have to use some shared memory abstraction, like multiprocessing.Value, applying mutex along the way of course.

UPDATE

I said you could do it (and there are modules that more or less are doing it, check pathos.multiprocessing for example) but I don't think it's worth the trouble - when you come to a point where you have to trick your system into doing what you want, chances are you're either using a wrong system or you should rethink your design. But for the sake of informedness, here is one way to do what you want in a multiprocessing setting:

import sys
from multiprocessing import Pool

def parallel_call(params):  # a helper for calling 'remote' instances
    cls = getattr(sys.modules[__name__], params[0])  # get our class type
    instance = cls.__new__(cls)  # create a new instance without invoking __init__
    instance.__dict__ = params[1]  # apply the passed state to the new instance
    method = getattr(instance, params[2])  # get the requested method
    args = params[3] if isinstance(params[3], (list, tuple)) else [params[3]]
    return method(*args)  # expand arguments, call our method and return the result

class A(object):

    def __init__(self, vl):
        self.vl = vl

    def cal(self, nb):
        return nb * self.vl

    def run(self, dt):
        t = Pool(processes=4)
        rs = t.map(parallel_call, self.prepare_call("cal", dt))
        t.close()
        return rs

    def prepare_call(self, name, args):  # creates a 'remote call' package for each argument
        for arg in args:
            yield [self.__class__.__name__, self.__dict__, name, arg]

if __name__ == "__main__":  # important protection for cross-platform use
    a = A(2)
    print(a.run(list(range(10))))
    # prints: [0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18]

I think it's pretty self explanatory how it works, but in short it passes the name of your class, its current state (sans signals, tho), a desired method to be called and arguments to invoke it with to a parallel_call function which is called for each process in the Pool. Python automatically pickles and unpickles all this data so all parallel_call needs to do is reconstruct the original object, find a desired method in it and call it with the provided param(s).

This way we're passing only the data without trying to pass active objects so Python doesn't complain (well, in this case, try adding a reference to a instance method to your class parameters and see what happens) and everything works just fine.

If you want to go heavy on the 'magic' you can make it look exactly like your code (create your own Pool handler, pick up names from the functions and send the names to actual processes, etc.) but this should serve a sufficient function for your example.

However, before you raise your hopes up, keep in mind that this will work only when sharing a 'static' instance (an instance that doesn't change its initial state once you start invoking it in a multiprocessing context). If the A.cal method is to change the internal state of the vl property - it would affect only the instance where it changes (unless it changes in the main instance that calls the Pool between calls). If you want to share the state as well, you can upgrade parallel_call to pick up instance.__dict__ after the call and return it together with the method call result, then on the calling side you'd have to update the local __dict__ with the returned data to change the original state. And that's not enough - you'd actually have to create a shared dict and handle all the mutex staff to have it concurrently accessed by all the processes (you can use multiprocessing.Manager for that).

So, as I was saying, more trouble than its worth...

4
  • So in my case there is no solution that we can use a class method to spam multiple process with using the shared memory in class, right? Is the correct approach only be bring the spawning methods outside the class?
    – Gotte
    Commented May 26, 2017 at 7:45
  • There is a solution, I just updated my answer. It's clunky and not all that nice, but it works... Then again, I'd suggest re-thinking your design so you don't have to deal with shared instances' states. No reason to make it harder on yourself than it has to be...
    – zwer
    Commented May 26, 2017 at 13:30
  • Thank you for you help. I added up your code and it run perfectly however I think I should redesign my code just as your advice :)
    – Gotte
    Commented May 29, 2017 at 0:37
  • @zwer Thanks a gazillion times! this has been driving me insane! on a side note, how do I terminate the now zombie process?
    – Hossein
    Commented May 4, 2020 at 8:26
0

Question: it seems didn't work (as I saw in Task Manager that only 1 process was running) and result is never delivered.

You see only 1 process as Pool calculate the number of used processes as follows:
You give range(10) = task index 0..9, therefore Pool compute (10 / 4) * 4 = 8+1 = 9.
After starting the first process there are no more task left.
Use range(32) and you will see 4 process running.

You are returning return t, instead of returning the result of rs = pool.map(....


This will work, for instance

def cal(self, nb):
    import os
    print('pid:{} cal({})'.format(os.getpid(), nb))
    return nb * self.vl

def run(self,df):
    with mp.Pool(processes=4) as pool:
       return pool.map(self.cal, df)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    a = A(2)
    result = a.run(list(range(32)))
    print(result)

Tested with Python: 3.4.2

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