103

Is it possible to detect when someone presses Enter while typing in a JTextField in java? Without having to create a button and set it as the default.

167

A JTextField was designed to use an ActionListener just like a JButton is. See the addActionListener() method of JTextField.

For example:

Action action = new AbstractAction()
{
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
    {
        System.out.println("some action");
    }
};

JTextField textField = new JTextField(10);
textField.addActionListener( action );

Now the event is fired when the Enter key is used.

Also, an added benefit is that you can share the listener with a button even if you don't want to make the button a default button.

JButton button = new JButton("Do Something");
button.addActionListener( action );

Note, this example uses an Action, which implements ActionListener because Action is a newer API with addition features. For example you could disable the Action which would disable the event for both the text field and the button.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Agreed. More elegant solution than mine, in the general case. – Kos Dec 12 '10 at 21:28
  • @camickr is an expert of Java swings – Mohamed Iqzas Jan 2 '17 at 9:56
22
JTextField function=new JTextField(8);   
function.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){

                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e){

                        //statements!!!

                }});

all you need to do is addActionListener to the JTextField like above! After you press Enter the action will performed what you want at the statement!

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14

Add an event for KeyPressed.

private void jTextField1KeyPressed(java.awt.event.KeyEvent evt) {
  if(evt.getKeyCode() == KeyEvent.VK_ENTER) {
      // Enter was pressed. Your code goes here.
   }
} 
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  • -1 :( KeyListeners are way too low level from Swing's perspective. Use the API which is intended to be used with Swing :-) – nIcE cOw Aug 20 '13 at 5:47
  • 1
    @nIcEcOw KeyListeners are way too low level from Swing's perspective: CITATION NEEDED. – guido May 2 '15 at 13:09
  • 2
    @ᴳᵁᴵᴰᴼ: A very well documented thingy, can be found at the official tutorials of KeyBindings, though a very good answer on stackoverflow, also covers the same aspect :-) – nIcE cOw May 2 '15 at 16:50
  • 1
    @nIcEcOw that's exactly the doc page I had in mind. I find a lot of difference between suggesting to prefer bindings for shortcuts and actions, only use listeners for controlling the keyboard at low-level, and don't use because it's the wrong api. The doc page is not so black-and-white either. – guido May 3 '15 at 1:08
  • 1
    @ᴳᵁᴵᴰᴼ: KeyListeners have many shortcomings, which are taken care of by to a greater extent by KeyBindings, such as, focus related, copy/paste related and many many more. It is to be avoided, for trivial tasks, such as, as asked in OP. – nIcE cOw May 3 '15 at 2:23
8

Do you want to do something like this ?

JTextField mTextField = new JTextField();
    mTextField.addKeyListener(new KeyAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
            if(e.getKeyCode() == KeyEvent.VK_ENTER){
                // something like...
               //mTextField.getText();
               // or...
               //mButton.doClick();
            }
        }

    });
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1

First add action command on JButton or JTextField by:

JButton.setActionCommand("name of command");
JTextField.setActionCommand("name of command");

Then add ActionListener to both JTextField and JButton.

JButton.addActionListener(listener);
JTextField.addActionListener(listener);

After that, On you ActionListener implementation write

@Override
public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
{
    String actionCommand = e.getActionCommand();

    if(actionCommand.equals("Your actionCommand for JButton") || actionCommand.equals("Your   actionCommand for press Enter"))
    {
        //Do something
    }
}
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1

The other answers (including the accepted ones) are good, but if you already use Java8, you can do the following (in a shorter, newer way):

textField.addActionListener(
    ae -> {
        //dostuff
    }
);

As the accepted answer told, you can simply react with an ActionListener, which catches the Enter-Key.

However, my approach takes benefit of the functional concepts which was introduced in Java 8.

If you want to use the same action for example for a button and the JTextField, you can do the following:

ActionListener l = ae -> {
    //do stuff
}

button.addActionListener(l);
textField.addActionListener(l);

If further explaination is needed, please let me know!

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0

If you want to set a default button action in a JTextField enter, you have to do this:

//put this after initComponents();

textField.addActionListener(button.getActionListeners()[0]);

It is [0] because a button can has a lot of actions, but normally just has one (ActionPerformed).

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-2
public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e)
{
    int key=e.getKeyCode();
    if(e.getSource()==textField)
    {
        if(key==KeyEvent.VK_ENTER)
        { 
            Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().beep();
            textField_1.requestFocusInWindow();                     
        }
    }

To write logic for 'Enter press' in JTextField, it is better to keep logic inside the keyReleased() block instead of keyTyped() & keyPressed().

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  • 1
    -1 :( for repeating the same mistake again, which has already been down-voted in the previous answers, along with the specified reason for the same. KeyListeners are way too low level from Swing's perspective. Use the API which is intended to be used with Swing :-) – nIcE cOw Aug 20 '13 at 5:44
-3

Just use this code:

SwingUtilities.getRootPane(myButton).setDefaultButton(myButton);
| improve this answer | |

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