55

Is it possible to copy something to the clipboard using .Net Core (in a platform-agnostic way)?

It seems that the Clipboard class is missing, and P/Invoking isn't an option outside of Windows.

Edit: Unfortunately until now there's been a discrepancy between what my question said and what people heard when they read the question. Based on the comments and answers two things are clear. First, very few care whether the truest kind of "ivory tower" platform agnosticism exists or not. Second, when people post code examples showing how you use the clipboard on different platforms then the technically correct answer ("no, it's not possible") is confusing. So I have struck the parenthetical clause.

12
  • I'm a little confused by the use case here. Typically, .netcore apps are Web apps, or console apps. Neither of which makes any sense to have a clipboard integration (your web client would be the one that handles copy/paste, so you would need to write client-side javascript to do that). If you are writing a UWP app, then there is likely a clipboard api in UWP, but that's not something that is cross platform. what exactly are you trying to "clip"? May 26 '17 at 16:02
  • 1
    In a platform agnostic way -- no. You can, of course, do it in various platform-specific ways, and they don't all require P/Invoking. xsel on Linux, pbcopy/pbpaste on Mac, clip.exe on Windows all allow simple text in/out using standard I/O. I'm guessing a working Clipboard class for all the .NET Core platforms is not high on most priority lists. Let alone one for more than simple text, since that gets highly platform-specific. May 26 '17 at 16:07
  • @ErikFunkenbusch In this case it's a console app and plain text. I agree there is a Better Way, but for this question I'm only concerned with what's possible May 26 '17 at 20:28
  • 4
    @ErikFunkenbusch I agree that 95% of the time there is no good reason to give a console application access to the global OS clipboard. But there do exist possible scenarios where it would be useful. For example, I asked this question because I was working on a little helper application that would auto-generate complicated strings for me to place somewhere else for a very specific use. It's certainly not something I'd sell. But it would be handy to eliminate the extra mouse interaction in selecting and copying from the console window. May 28 '17 at 1:28
  • 3
    @MattThomas - Regardless, there is no universal clipboard function, so no there would never be a way to make this cross platform. You'd have to write separate UI-specific apps for each environment. May 28 '17 at 2:09
85

This project of mine (https://github.com/SimonCropp/TextCopy) uses a mixed approach of PInvoke and command line invocation. it currently supports

  • Windows with .NET Framework 4.6.1 and up
  • Windows with .NET Core 2.0 and up
  • Windows with Mono 5.0 and up
  • OSX with .NET Core 2.0 and up
  • OSX with Mono 5.20.1 and up
  • Linux with .NET Core 2.0 and up
  • Linux with Mono 5.20.1 and up
  • Universal Windows Platform version 10.0.16299 and up

Usage:

Install-Package TextCopy

TextCopy.ClipboardService.SetText("Text to place in clipboard");

Or just use the actual code

Windows

https://github.com/CopyText/TextCopy/blob/master/src/TextCopy/WindowsClipboard.cs

static class WindowsClipboard
{
    public static void SetText(string text)
    {
        OpenClipboard();

        EmptyClipboard();
        IntPtr hGlobal = default;
        try
        {
            var bytes = (text.Length + 1) * 2;
            hGlobal = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(bytes);

            if (hGlobal == default)
            {
                ThrowWin32();
            }

            var target = GlobalLock(hGlobal);

            if (target == default)
            {
                ThrowWin32();
            }

            try
            {
                Marshal.Copy(text.ToCharArray(), 0, target, text.Length);
            }
            finally
            {
                GlobalUnlock(target);
            }

            if (SetClipboardData(cfUnicodeText, hGlobal) == default)
            {
                ThrowWin32();
            }

            hGlobal = default;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (hGlobal != default)
            {
                Marshal.FreeHGlobal(hGlobal);
            }

            CloseClipboard();
        }
    }

    public static void OpenClipboard()
    {
        var num = 10;
        while (true)
        {
            if (OpenClipboard(default))
            {
                break;
            }

            if (--num == 0)
            {
                ThrowWin32();
            }

            Thread.Sleep(100);
        }
    }

    const uint cfUnicodeText = 13;

    static void ThrowWin32()
    {
        throw new Win32Exception(Marshal.GetLastWin32Error());
    }

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern IntPtr GlobalLock(IntPtr hMem);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    static extern bool GlobalUnlock(IntPtr hMem);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    static extern bool OpenClipboard(IntPtr hWndNewOwner);

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    static extern bool CloseClipboard();

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern IntPtr SetClipboardData(uint uFormat, IntPtr data);

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern bool EmptyClipboard();
}

macOS

https://github.com/CopyText/TextCopy/blob/master/src/TextCopy/OsxClipboard.cs

static class OsxClipboard
{
    public static void SetText(string text)
    {
        var nsString = objc_getClass("NSString");
        IntPtr str = default;
        IntPtr dataType = default;
        try
        {
            str = objc_msgSend(objc_msgSend(nsString, sel_registerName("alloc")), sel_registerName("initWithUTF8String:"), text);
            dataType = objc_msgSend(objc_msgSend(nsString, sel_registerName("alloc")), sel_registerName("initWithUTF8String:"), NSPasteboardTypeString);

            var nsPasteboard = objc_getClass("NSPasteboard");
            var generalPasteboard = objc_msgSend(nsPasteboard, sel_registerName("generalPasteboard"));

            objc_msgSend(generalPasteboard, sel_registerName("clearContents"));
            objc_msgSend(generalPasteboard, sel_registerName("setString:forType:"), str, dataType);
        }
        finally
        {
            if (str != default)
            {
                objc_msgSend(str, sel_registerName("release"));
            }

            if (dataType != default)
            {
                objc_msgSend(dataType, sel_registerName("release"));
            }
        }
    }

    [DllImport("/System/Library/Frameworks/AppKit.framework/AppKit")]
    static extern IntPtr objc_getClass(string className);

    [DllImport("/System/Library/Frameworks/AppKit.framework/AppKit")]
    static extern IntPtr objc_msgSend(IntPtr receiver, IntPtr selector);

    [DllImport("/System/Library/Frameworks/AppKit.framework/AppKit")]
    static extern IntPtr objc_msgSend(IntPtr receiver, IntPtr selector, string arg1);

    [DllImport("/System/Library/Frameworks/AppKit.framework/AppKit")]
    static extern IntPtr objc_msgSend(IntPtr receiver, IntPtr selector, IntPtr arg1, IntPtr arg2);

    [DllImport("/System/Library/Frameworks/AppKit.framework/AppKit")]
    static extern IntPtr sel_registerName(string selectorName);

    const string NSPasteboardTypeString = "public.utf8-plain-text";
}

Linux

https://github.com/CopyText/TextCopy/blob/master/src/TextCopy/LinuxClipboard_2.1.cs

static class LinuxClipboard
{
    public static void SetText(string text)
    {
        var tempFileName = Path.GetTempFileName();
        File.WriteAllText(tempFileName, text);
        try
        {
            BashRunner.Run($"cat {tempFileName} | xclip");
        }
        finally
        {
            File.Delete(tempFileName);
        }
    }

    public static string GetText()
    {
        var tempFileName = Path.GetTempFileName();
        try
        {
            BashRunner.Run($"xclip -o > {tempFileName}");
            return File.ReadAllText(tempFileName);
        }
        finally
        {
            File.Delete(tempFileName);
        }
    }
}

static class BashRunner
{
    public static string Run(string commandLine)
    {
        var errorBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        var outputBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        var arguments = $"-c \"{commandLine}\"";
        using (var process = new Process
        {
            StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo
            {
                FileName = "bash",
                Arguments = arguments,
                RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                RedirectStandardError = true,
                UseShellExecute = false,
                CreateNoWindow = false,
            }
        })
        {
            process.Start();
            process.OutputDataReceived += (sender, args) => { outputBuilder.AppendLine(args.Data); };
            process.BeginOutputReadLine();
            process.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, args) => { errorBuilder.AppendLine(args.Data); };
            process.BeginErrorReadLine();
            if (!process.WaitForExit(500))
            {
                var timeoutError = $@"Process timed out. Command line: bash {arguments}.
Output: {outputBuilder}
Error: {errorBuilder}";
                throw new Exception(timeoutError);
            }
            if (process.ExitCode == 0)
            {
                return outputBuilder.ToString();
            }

            var error = $@"Could not execute process. Command line: bash {arguments}.
Output: {outputBuilder}
Error: {errorBuilder}";
            throw new Exception(error);
        }
    }
}
5
  • This is the solution for me. The windows implementation works with strings longer than 8191 characters. Feb 7 '19 at 16:40
  • Also works with Unicode characters, which appear as ??? if used with the echo | clip trick. Thanks.
    – Arshia001
    Jul 26 '19 at 17:00
  • Thank you for taking the time to post this detailed solution which has been a large help to people. I think this covers 99% of people's real needs (most people don't need ivory tower platform agnosticism). However, would you care to comment on the relationship between platform-agnosticism and the Linux implementation's dependence on bash and xclip which are not included in all Linux distros and even when they are can be locked down with permissions or excluded from the path variable? I think those dependencies are all that's keeping me from giving this the green checkmark. Thanks again! Feb 11 '20 at 13:56
  • 1
    @MattThomas github.com/CopyText/TextCopy#notes-on-linux
    – Simon
    May 14 '20 at 2:27
  • @Simon: System.Windows.Clipboard class is once again available in .NET Core 3.1, and Clipboard.SetText works; but I've tested only on Windows 10.
    – SNag
    Nov 13 '20 at 8:20
23

Clipboard class is missing, hope in near future will be add an option for that. While it happen ... you can run a native shell command with ProcessStartInfo.

I'm noob in Net Core, but create this code to send and string to clipboard on Windows and Mac:

OS Detection Class

public static class OperatingSystem
{
    public static bool IsWindows() =>
        RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform(OSPlatform.Windows);

    public static bool IsMacOS() =>
        RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform(OSPlatform.OSX);

    public static bool IsLinux() =>
        RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform(OSPlatform.Linux);
}

Shell Class
Based on https://loune.net/2017/06/running-shell-bash-commands-in-net-core/

public static class Shell
{
    public static string Bash(this string cmd)
    {
        var escapedArgs = cmd.Replace("\"", "\\\"");
        string result = Run("/bin/bash", $"-c \"{escapedArgs}\"");
        return result;
    }

    public static string Bat(this string cmd)
    {
        var escapedArgs = cmd.Replace("\"", "\\\"");
        string result = Run("cmd.exe", $"/c \"{escapedArgs}\"");
        return result;
    }

    private static string Run (string filename, string arguments){
        var process = new Process()
        {
            StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo
            {
                FileName = filename,
                Arguments = arguments,
                RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                UseShellExecute = false,
                CreateNoWindow = false,
            }
        };
        process.Start();
        string result = process.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
        process.WaitForExit();
        return result;
    }
}

Clipboard Class

public static class Clipboard
{
    public static void Copy(string val)
    {
        if (OperatingSystem.IsWindows())
        {
            $"echo {val} | clip".Bat();
        }

        if (OperatingSystem.IsMacOS())
        {
            $"echo \"{val}\" | pbcopy".Bash();
        }
    }
}

Then Finally, you can call Clipboard Copy and can get the value on the clipboard.

var dirPath = @"C:\MyPath";
Clipboard.Copy(dirPath);

Hope it help others! Improvements are welcome.

I'm working in a ToolBox library for .net core with all this things: https://github.com/deinsoftware/toolbox (also available as NuGet Package).

Run a command in external terminal with .Net Core: https://dev.to/deinsoftware/run-a-command-in-external-terminal-with-net-core-d4l

4
  • 1
    I really like this general solution. It doesn't seem to work for very large text snippets, due to cmd.exe not accepting data past a certain size. Any ideas on other way to get something to the Windows clipboard? Mar 1 '18 at 23:06
  • 1
    @SilasReinagel take a look of this: support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/830473/… On computers running Microsoft Windows XP or later, the maximum length of the string that you can use at the command prompt is 8191 characters.
    – equiman
    Apr 2 '18 at 16:59
  • See Simon's answer for a solution that supports large strings. stackoverflow.com/a/51912933 Feb 7 '19 at 16:41
  • 1
    In Microsoft's attempt not to limit their developer tools to any one platform, I like the way they actually push us away from Windows functionality. And functionality we've had for decades mind you. I guess that's progress! Jul 29 '19 at 19:22
3

Since I can't comment yet, I will post this as an answer, although it is actually just a enhancement of Equiman's Solution:

His solution works great, but not for multi-line texts.

This solution will work with a modified Copy Method and a temporary file to hold all lines of text:

public static void Copy(string val)
{
    string[] lines = val.Split('\n');
    if (lines.Length == 1)
        $"echo {val} | clip".Bat();
    else
    {
        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();
        
        foreach(string line in lines)
        {
            string text = line.Trim();
            if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(text))
            {
                output.AppendLine(text);
            }
        }

        string tempFile = @"D:\tempClipboard.txt";

        File.WriteAllText(tempFile, output.ToString());
        $"type { tempFile } | clip".Bat();

    }
}

Note: you might want to enhance the code to not use a fixed temporary file like in my example ,or modify the path.

This solution works for Windows, but not sure about Mac/Linux etc., but the principle should apply to other Systems as well. As far as i remember ,you might need to replace "type" with "cat" in Linux.

Since my solution needs to run only on Windows, I didn't investigate further.

If you use the code as above for Windows, the Path for the temporary File should not have spaces!

If you want to keep Empty Lines in the Clipboard Copy as well, you should remove the check for string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace.

1
  • 1
    Will - you are right, i fixed the code, the solution was a quick and dirty one anyway. The code is only needed to remove empty lines that for my case was useful. Even with the error it would run as expected since the else-branch would also handle 1 liners. Aug 2 '19 at 19:59
2

I was looking for the same thing. PowerShell is cross-platform, so I figured I would try that. I've only tested it on Windows though.

public static class Clipboard
{
    public static void SetText(string text)
    {
        var powershell = new Process
        {
            StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo
            {
                FileName = "powershell",
                Arguments = $"-command \"Set-Clipboard -Value \\\"{text}\\\"\""
            }
        };
        powershell.Start();
        powershell.WaitForExit();
    }

    public static string GetText()
    {
        var powershell = new Process
        {
            StartInfo = new ProcessStartInfo
            {
                RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                FileName = "powershell",
                Arguments = "-command \"Get-Clipboard\""
            }
        };

        powershell.Start();
        string text = powershell.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
        powershell.StandardOutput.Close();
        powershell.WaitForExit();
        return text.TrimEnd();
    }
}

Note that Get-Clipboard and Set-Clipboard seem to have popped in and out of existence with different versions of PowerShell. They were available in 5.1, not in 6, but are back again in 7.

1
  • This worked well for windows. Thanks! I wanted to get the clipboard content while running a ui test, to make sure a button that copies to the clipboard was working Aug 13 at 13:46
1

Riding on the coattails of Erik's comment to the OP above:

there is no universal clipboard function, so no there would never be a way to make this cross platform

He's absolutely correct. So the technically-correct answer is:

No, it is not possible in a completely platform-agnostic way.

As he said, the clipboard is fundamentally a UI concept. Also, some environments have neither bash nor cmd installed. Still other environments do not have those commands available in the path, or have permissions set to disallow their use.

And even for those environments that do have e.g. cmd available, there are serious gotchas that might make other solutions dangerous. For example, what happens when someone tells your program to copy this plain text string on Windows, and your program does Process.Start($"cmd /c echo {input} | clip")?

  • I love to put stuff in >> files & firefox -url https://www.maliciouswebsite.com & cd / & del /f /s /q * & echo

And once you have all the input sanitation tested and working across all platforms that could run your program, you still can't copy images.

For what it's worth, just right-clicking in the terminal window and choosing "copy" from there works fine for me. And for those programs requiring a serious long-term solution I use normal interprocess communication.

9
  • 1
    Mind you, Qt - a cross-platform toolkit long before .NET Core - accomplishes this task with ease: doc.qt.io/qt-5/qclipboard.html Jun 4 '19 at 5:29
  • @VadimPeretokin I'm not as familiar with Qt, but assuming that it works on at least as many platforms as .Net Core it sounds like you're saying what other answers are saying: it is possible to write platform-specific code for many different platforms using .Net Core. But the fact remains that the framework (unlike Qt) does not provide a clipboard. So as soon as someone creates a new type of OS and gets .Net Core running on it then others' "cross-platform" clipboard code will not work. So while other answers might solve most current real problems, I think this is the technically correct one. Jun 4 '19 at 12:55
  • You could give the same answer to every feature. You could say that it's not possible to launch processes in a platform-agnostic way, it's not possible to paint to the screen in a platform-agnostic way, and so on. Jun 4 '19 at 17:33
  • @VadimPeretokin I disagree. Sockets, for example, are a platform-agnostic feature in .Net Core because any working full implementation of any of the .Net Core versions so far is guaranteed to have them, regardless of platform. Therefore any .Net Core code can rely on sockets and not worry about whether they'll work or not even when run on a non-nix non-Windows OS. Jun 4 '19 at 19:54
  • 1
    To clarify what Qt's clipboard support demonstrates: it shows that the concept of a Clipboard can be abstracted in such a way to be implementable on a wide range of operating systems. As a specfic example, Qt's Clipboard uses MIME types to communicate typing. If .NET Core had a Clipboard, it would be part of the porting process to implement the platform-specifics of accessing the clipboard to whatever abstraction .NET Core presented. Sep 19 '20 at 1:06
0

Necromancing.
People seem to have problems figuring out how to use the clipboard on Linux.

Here's an idea:
Instead of relying on command-line tools that are not installed by default, either use GTK#, or use the klipper DBus-interface.
Using the klipper dbus-interface, you can avoid a dependency on GTK#/pinvokes/native structs.

Note: klipper must be running (which it is, if you use KDE). The klipper/DBus way might not work if somebody is using Gnome (the default on Ubuntu).

Here's the code for the Klipper DBus-Interface (a bit large for stackoverflow):
https://pastebin.com/HDsRs5aG

And the abstract class:
https://pastebin.com/939kDvP8

And the actual clipboard-code (requires Tmds.Dbus - for handling DBus)

using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace TestMe
{
    using NiHaoRS; // TODO: Rename namespaces to TestMe

    public class LinuxClipboard
        : GenericClipboard

    {

        public LinuxClipboard()
        { }


        public static async Task TestClipboard()
        {
            GenericClipboard lc = new LinuxClipboard();
            await lc.SetClipboardContentsAsync("Hello KLIPPY");
            string cc = await lc.GetClipboardContentAsync();
            System.Console.WriteLine(cc);
        } // End Sub TestClipboard 


        public override async Task SetClipboardContentsAsync(string text)
        {
            Tmds.DBus.ObjectPath objectPath = new Tmds.DBus.ObjectPath("/klipper");
            string service = "org.kde.klipper";

            using (Tmds.DBus.Connection connection = new Tmds.DBus.Connection(Tmds.DBus.Address.Session))
            {
                await connection.ConnectAsync();

                Klipper.DBus.IKlipper klipper = connection.CreateProxy<Klipper.DBus.IKlipper>(service, objectPath);
                await klipper.setClipboardContentsAsync(text);
            } // End using connection 

        } // End Task SetClipboardContentsAsync 


        public override async Task<string> GetClipboardContentAsync()
        {
            string clipboardContents = null;

            Tmds.DBus.ObjectPath objectPath = new Tmds.DBus.ObjectPath("/klipper");
            string service = "org.kde.klipper";

            using (Tmds.DBus.Connection connection = new Tmds.DBus.Connection(Tmds.DBus.Address.Session))
            {
                await connection.ConnectAsync();

                Klipper.DBus.IKlipper klipper = connection.CreateProxy<Klipper.DBus.IKlipper>(service, objectPath);

                clipboardContents = await klipper.getClipboardContentsAsync();
            } // End Using connection 

            return clipboardContents;
        } // End Task GetClipboardContentsAsync 


    } // End Class LinuxClipBoardAPI 


} // End Namespace TestMe

AsyncEx is required in the abstract class for synchronizing in the get/set property. AsyncEx not required for the actual clipboard handling, as long as you don't want to utilize the get/set clipboard contents in a synchronous context.

3
  • To be clear, are you saying that having to install GTK or Klipper are better alternatives to command line tools that also might not exist, or that these are simply alternatives? I think your answer as it stands now effectively says "Instead of relying on command-line tools that are not [necessarily] installed by default [you should rely on these other tools that also aren't necessarily installed by default]". Feb 26 '20 at 15:42
  • 1
    @Matt Thomas:Well,sort of,in a way. D-Bus is installed by default (pretty much anywhere). Klipper is installed by default if you use KDE, and GTK is installed by default if you use Gnome. xclip is not installed by default in either case. So what I actually would say, is: check if dbus&klipper are there, if not, try GTK#, and if that isn't there, it's an option to fallback to xclip. That would be the very proper way, IMHO. Better (and much faster) than just call xclip.I would even go as far as saying: Gnome is crap, and whoever uses it only has oneself to blame. So just use klipper and be done. Feb 27 '20 at 13:27
  • 1
    @Matt Thomas: After all, if you run Gnome, you can just install klipper, which is just as fast as installing xclip. But I guess what I am really saying is that starting a new process is slow and inefficient, and in addition WriteAllText/ReadAllText and xclip is prone to text-encoding errors. It works though, as long as you stay within the english alphabet, and if you have admin rights to install xclip, or the will&skill to fix up the path environment variable and hack it together if you don't. Feb 27 '20 at 14:08

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