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I have this simple C++ code named hello.cpp which has a function to print "Hello world"

#include <iostream>

void hello_world();

int main() {
    std::cout << "Start" << std::endl;
}

void hello_world() {
    std::cout << "Hello world" << std::endl;
}

I build the .dll (~1.9mb) using:

g++ -c hello.cpp
g++ -static -fPIC -o hello.dll hello.o

(using -shared gives a WinError 126 ... module not found when trying to access it in python)

The python code is:

from ctypes import cdll

lib = cdll.LoadLibrary('hello.dll')
lib.hello_world()

This throws the following error:

AttributeError: function 'hello_world' not found

I've read people mention that a __declspec(dllexport) wrapper is necessary and so is a extern "C" so that the code doesn't get "mangled". So now using that as the code:

#include <iostream>

extern "C" {
    __declspec(dllexport) void hello_world();
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Opened" << std::endl;
}


void hello_world() {
    std::cout << "hello world" << std::endl;
}

The python line lib.hello_world() now raises:

OSError: exception: access violation writing 0x000E28A0

What are the issues here? How can I get python to recognise and run the C++ function in the .dll? Can I skip the middleman and somehow run a C++ function from a .cpp file or a .o file?

edit:

Using eryksun's answer, it turns out that the dllexport isn't needed. The extern "C" is a must though

  • 1: You are mixing c compilers and C (C++) runtimes (Python is compiled with VStudio while your .dll with g++). 2: Your .dll has a main function which qualifies it as an executable (not to mention the lack of -shared linker flag). – CristiFati May 26 '17 at 23:06
  • @CristiFati Changing the name of the function in my C++ code from main to anything else gives me a undefined reference to `WinMain@16' error when on the 2nd step of the g++ process. Could you elaborate on the "Python is compiled with VStudio"? – Lobstw May 26 '17 at 23:13
  • That's usually because you're building a Windows Application (check [MSDN]: /SUBSYSTEM (Specify Subsystem) linker flag). – CristiFati May 26 '17 at 23:17
  • Should I be building a Windows application or not in this case? I didn't know .o or .dlls were considered applications. If yes or even if not, what should I do instead with g++? – Lobstw May 26 '17 at 23:28
  • 1
    Try -static -shared -- as weird as that sounds. – Eryk Sun May 27 '17 at 0:48
2

Thanks to @eryksun, this was solved in this case by compiling like this:

g++ -c hello.cpp
g++ -static -shared -o hello.dll hello.o

Having the C++ code set up like so:

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::cout << "Opened" << std::endl;
}

void hello_world() {
    std::cout << "hello world" << std::endl;
}

extern "C" {
    void hello_world();
}

And running it from Python as usual:

from ctypes import cdll

lib = cdll.LoadLibrary('hello.dll')
lib.hello_world()
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