-1

This question already has an answer here:

Consider the following code:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

std::size_t preceding_pow2(std::size_t n)
{
    std::size_t k = 1;
    while (k > 0 && k < n) {
        k <<= 1;
    }
    return k >> 1;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::size_t n = argc > 1 ? std::stoull(argv[1]) : 1ULL << 6;
    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        std::cout << i << " " << preceding_pow2(i) << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

It produces the following result:

0 0
1 0
2 1
3 2
4 2
5 4
6 4
7 4
8 4
9 8
10 8
11 8
12 8
13 8
14 8
15 8
16 8
17 16
18 16
19 16
20 16
21 16
22 16
23 16
24 16
25 16
26 16
27 16
28 16
29 16
30 16
31 16
32 16
33 32
34 32
35 32
36 32
37 32
38 32
39 32
40 32
41 32
42 32
43 32
44 32
45 32
46 32
47 32
48 32
49 32
50 32
51 32
52 32
53 32
54 32
55 32
56 32
57 32
58 32
59 32
60 32
61 32
62 32
63 32

Which is:

  • For 0 as input, the output is 0
  • For 1 as input, the output is 0
  • If the input is a power of 2, it returns the preceding power of 2
  • If the input is not a power of 2, it returns the power of 2 that is less than this number

Would there be any faster way to implement that function for high performance code?

marked as duplicate by Weak to Enuma Elish, user207421, STLDev, phuclv, Blastfurnace May 27 '17 at 1:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    Consider that you haven't asked a question... I'd be looking at a math answer rather than a loop / counting answer. Maybe 2 ^ floor(log2(n)) , however that translates to C++... but probably there's a bit-twiddling approach to take the highest set bit – TessellatingHeckler May 27 '17 at 1:09
  • 1
    Which is really odd for someone with that much reputation – 8bitwide May 27 '17 at 1:13
  • 1
    This looks to be a better fit for codereview. Might be some benefit to a look-up table rather than loop and shift – user4581301 May 27 '17 at 1:13
  • 1
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs on another stack exchange site not listed. – STLDev May 27 '17 at 1:16
  • Sorry, did not even notice that I didn't write the question... – Vincent May 27 '17 at 1:22
1

You can rewrite your function with a bit twiddling hack:

std::size_t preceding_pow2(std::size_t v) {
    v--;
    v |= v >> 1;
    v |= v >> 2;
    v |= v >> 4;
    v |= v >> 8;
    v |= v >> 16;
    return (++v) >> 1;
}

Demo.

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