152

for example, for 1, 2, 128, 256 the output can be (16 digits):

0000000000000001
0000000000000010
0000000010000000
0000000100000000

I tried

String.format("%16s", Integer.toBinaryString(1));

it puts spaces for left-padding:

`               1'

How to put 0s for padding. I couldn't find it in Formatter. Is there another way to do it?

P.S. this post describes how to format integers with left 0-padding, but it is not for the binary representation.

3
  • Have you tried using %016s? Dec 12, 2010 at 11:32
  • 1
    @Deniz yes, it fails with Exception in thread "main" java.util.FormatFlagsConversionMismatchException: Conversion = s, Flags = 0
    – khachik
    Dec 12, 2010 at 11:34
  • take a look at this: stackoverflow.com/a/15124135/1316649
    – fstang
    Jan 17, 2014 at 3:14

17 Answers 17

237

I think this is a suboptimal solution, but you could do

String.format("%16s", Integer.toBinaryString(1)).replace(' ', '0')
5
  • 3
    Yes, I do it now, but I believe there should be another way :) Thank you.
    – khachik
    Dec 12, 2010 at 11:43
  • actually after doing some research, looks like you can't do it just using printf syntax.. So perhaps it's not so bad after all. Dec 12, 2010 at 11:47
  • @Daniel Negative number won't contain any space, so it also works.
    – Eric
    Feb 15, 2019 at 5:30
  • @Daniel Integer::toBinaryString doc: Returns a string representation of the integer argument as an unsigned integer in base 2.
    – Alan
    Nov 26, 2019 at 18:23
  • This gets even worse if the width is a variable. Jan 5 at 12:06
20

There is no binary conversion built into the java.util.Formatter, I would advise you to either use String.replace to replace space character with zeros, as in:

String.format("%16s", Integer.toBinaryString(1)).replace(" ", "0")

Or implement your own logic to convert integers to binary representation with added left padding somewhere along the lines given in this so. Or if you really need to pass numbers to format, you can convert your binary representation to BigInteger and then format that with leading zeros, but this is very costly at runtime, as in:

String.format("%016d", new BigInteger(Integer.toBinaryString(1)))
2
  • Thanks, this one is better, since it avoids the overflow on big numbers (e.g. 2^30).
    – khachik
    Dec 12, 2010 at 11:51
  • 1
    Yes, but I really would not do it, I would use either replace method or my own padding method: one way would be to use String.format again to format the needed padding length with argument zero, or in code: String.format("%0" + (32 - binary.length()) + "d"%s", 0, binary) of course you'll need to watch for negative outcomes of 32 - binary.length()... Dec 12, 2010 at 12:02
19

Here a new answer for an old post.

To pad a binary value with leading zeros to a specific length, try this:

Integer.toBinaryString( (1 << len) | val ).substring( 1 )

If len = 4 and val = 1,

Integer.toBinaryString( (1 << len) | val )

returns the string "10001", then

"10001".substring( 1 )

discards the very first character. So we obtain what we want:

"0001"

If val is likely to be negative, rather try:

Integer.toBinaryString( (1 << len) | (val & ((1 << len) - 1)) ).substring( 1 )
1
17

You can use Apache Commons StringUtils. It offers methods for padding strings:

StringUtils.leftPad(Integer.toBinaryString(1), 16, '0');
9

I was trying all sorts of method calls that I haven't really used before to make this work, they worked with moderate success, until I thought of something that is so simple it just might work, and it did!

I'm sure it's been thought of before, not sure if it's any good for long string of binary codes but it works fine for 16Bit strings. Hope it helps!! (Note second piece of code is improved)

String binString = Integer.toBinaryString(256);
  while (binString.length() < 16) {    //pad with 16 0's
        binString = "0" + binString;
  }

Thanks to Will on helping improve this answer to make it work with out a loop. This maybe a little clumsy but it works, please improve and comment back if you can....

binString = Integer.toBinaryString(256);
int length = 16 - binString.length();
char[] padArray = new char[length];
Arrays.fill(padArray, '0');
String padString = new String(padArray);
binString = padString + binString;
2
  • This is a nice and simple solution. It could be improved by using the difference between binString.length() and 16 to create a string and then appending that string to binString rather than looping though with something like this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/2804866/1353098
    – Will
    Oct 12, 2012 at 11:45
  • 2
    Will - you are brilliant, ill put that into my code right now! I didnt like the loop either, thankyou!!! Oct 12, 2012 at 11:49
7

A simpler version of user3608934's idea "This is an old trick, create a string with 16 0's then append the trimmed binary string you got ":

private String toBinaryString32(int i) {
    String binaryWithOutLeading0 = Integer.toBinaryString(i);
    return "00000000000000000000000000000000"
            .substring(binaryWithOutLeading0.length())
            + binaryWithOutLeading0;
}
5

Starting with Java 11, you can use the repeat(...) method:

"0".repeat(Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros(i) - 16) + Integer.toBinaryString(i)

Or, if you need 32-bit representation of any integer:

"0".repeat(Integer.numberOfLeadingZeros(i != 0 ? i : 1)) + Integer.toBinaryString(i)
1
  • For the 16-digit version, shouldn't that also check for i being zero, like the 32-bit version does?
    – k314159
    Nov 8, 2021 at 11:27
4

I do not know "right" solution but I can suggest you a fast patch.

String.format("%16s", Integer.toBinaryString(1)).replace(" ", "0");

I have just tried it and saw that it works fine.

1
  • why the formatter is only 16 characters wide? why not %32s ? May 27, 2015 at 7:13
3

try...

String.format("%016d\n", Integer.parseInt(Integer.toBinaryString(256)));

I dont think this is the "correct" way to doing this... but it works :)

1
  • 1
    This is certainly a poor way to do it because it only works up to a small fraction of input values.... The largest output it can successfully produce is 0000001111111111 for the input value 1023 Any value larger than that will produce the output from toBinaryString(1024) of 10000000000 which is too large for the parseInt(...) Thus, the input only works for 1K of 64K possible input values
    – rolfl
    Mar 18, 2015 at 16:53
1

I would write my own util class with the method like below

public class NumberFormatUtils {

public static String longToBinString(long val) {
    char[] buffer = new char[64];
    Arrays.fill(buffer, '0');
    for (int i = 0; i < 64; ++i) {
        long mask = 1L << i;
        if ((val & mask) == mask) {
            buffer[63 - i] = '1';
        }
    }
    return new String(buffer);
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    long value = 0b0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000101L;
    System.out.println(value);
    System.out.println(Long.toBinaryString(value));
    System.out.println(NumberFormatUtils.longToBinString(value));
}

}

Output:

5
101
0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000101

The same approach could be applied to any integral types. Pay attention to the type of mask

long mask = 1L << i;

1

A naive solution that work would be

String temp = Integer.toBinaryString(5);
while (temp.length() < Integer.SIZE) temp = "0"+temp; //pad leading zeros
temp = temp.substring(Integer.SIZE - Short.SIZE); //remove excess

One other method would be

String temp = Integer.toBinaryString((m | 0x80000000));
temp = temp.substring(Integer.SIZE - Short.SIZE);

This will produce a 16 bit string of the integer 5

1

You can use lib https://github.com/kssource/BitSequence. It accept a number and return bynary string, padded and/or grouped.

String s = new BitSequence(2, 16).toBynaryString(ALIGN.RIGHT, GROUP.CONTINOUSLY));  
return  
0000000000000010  

another examples:

[10, -20, 30]->00001010 11101100 00011110
i=-10->00000000000000000000000000001010
bi=10->1010
sh=10->00 0000 0000 1010
l=10->00000001 010
by=-10->1010
i=-10->bc->11111111 11111111 11111111 11110110
1

// Below will handle proper sizes

public static String binaryString(int i) {
    return String.format("%" + Integer.SIZE + "s", Integer.toBinaryString(i)).replace(' ', '0');
}

public static String binaryString(long i) {
    return String.format("%" + Long.SIZE + "s", Long.toBinaryString(i)).replace(' ', '0');
}
0

This is an old trick, create a string with 16 0's then append the trimmed binary string you got from String.format("%s", Integer.toBinaryString(1)) and use the right-most 16 characters, lopping off any leading 0's. Better yet, make a function that lets you specify how long of a binary string you want. Of course there are probably a bazillion other ways to accomplish this including libraries, but I'm adding this post to help out a friend :)

public class BinaryPrinter {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.format("%d in binary is %s\n", 1, binaryString(1, 4));
        System.out.format("%d in binary is %s\n", 128, binaryString(128, 8));
        System.out.format("%d in binary is %s\n", 256, binaryString(256, 16));
    }

    public static String binaryString( final int number, final int binaryDigits ) {
        final String pattern = String.format( "%%0%dd", binaryDigits );
        final String padding = String.format( pattern, 0 );
        final String response = String.format( "%s%s", padding, Integer.toBinaryString(number) );

        System.out.format( "\npattern = '%s'\npadding = '%s'\nresponse = '%s'\n\n", pattern, padding, response );

        return response.substring( response.length() - binaryDigits );
    }
}
0

This method converts an int to a String, length=bits. Either padded with 0s or with the most significant bits truncated.

static String toBitString( int x, int bits ){
    String bitString = Integer.toBinaryString(x);
    int size = bitString.length();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder( bits );
    if( bits > size ){
        for( int i=0; i<bits-size; i++ )
            sb.append('0');
        sb.append( bitString );
    }else
        sb = sb.append( bitString.substring(size-bits, size) );

    return sb.toString();
}
0
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
  for(int j=str[i].length();j<4;j++)
  str[i]="0".concat(str[i]);
}

str[i].length() is length of number say 2 in binary is 01 which is length 2 change 4 to desired max length of number. This can be optimized to O(n). by using continue.

0
import java.util.Scanner;
public class Q3{
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Scanner scn=new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter a number:");
    int num=scn.nextInt();
    int numB=Integer.parseInt(Integer.toBinaryString(num));
    String strB=String.format("%08d",numB);//makes a 8 character code
    if(num>=1 && num<=255){
     System.out.println(strB);
    }else{
        System.out.println("Number should be in range between 1 and 255");
    }
  }
}
1
  • 1
    numB and num are equal and not different in any way
    – igorepst
    Apr 10, 2019 at 18:02

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