32

How to get a random item from an enumeration?

enum Colors {
  Red, Green, Blue
}

function getRandomColor(): Color {
  // return a random Color (Red, Green, Blue) here
}

15 Answers 15

29

After much inspiration from the other solutions, and the keyof keyword, here is a generic method that returns a typesafe random enum.

function randomEnum<T>(anEnum: T): T[keyof T] {
  const enumValues = Object.keys(anEnum)
    .map(n => Number.parseInt(n))
    .filter(n => !Number.isNaN(n)) as unknown as T[keyof T][]
  const randomIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * enumValues.length)
  const randomEnumValue = enumValues[randomIndex]
  return randomEnumValue;
}

Use it like this:

interface MyEnum {X, Y, Z}
const myRandomValue = randomEnum(MyEnum) 

myRandomValue will be of type MyEnum.

6
  • 1
    Instead of Object.keys(anEnum).map(n => Number.parseInt(n)) couldn’t you use Object.values(anEnum).map(n => +n)? The enum’s keys are all strings whereas its values are a mix of numbers and strings (the numbers being the actual enum values and the strings being its keys). For example, given enum Bool { FALSE, TRUE }, Object.keys(Bool) would return ["0", "1", "FALSE", "TRUE"] (all strings) but Object.values(Bool) would return ["FALSE", "TRUE", 0, 1] (numbers and strings).
    – chharvey
    Apr 23, 2020 at 18:44
  • 2
    hmm, didnt work for me, is this for number based enums?
    – bitwit
    May 9, 2020 at 21:21
  • 1
    This code doesn't compile, have a lot of errors 1) Argument of type 'T' is not assignable to parameter of type 'object' 2) Property 'parseInt' does not exist on type 'NumberConstructor'. Do you need to change your target library? Try changing the 'lib' compiler option to 'es2015' or later 3) Property 'isNaN' does not exist on type 'NumberConstructor'. Do you need to change your target library? Try changing the 'lib' compiler option to 'es2015' or later Aug 4, 2021 at 16:47
  • most likely kotlin as changed their syntax. i will have a look and adjust. Aug 6, 2021 at 7:08
  • Just tried this with the newest Angular. Works on plain enums (with numeric values) but breaks when I create an enum with string values like enum Stuff {A="A", B="B"}. Edit: the answer by Kabir works, though.
    – Panossa
    Sep 28, 2022 at 14:06
27

Most of the above answers are returning the enum keys, but don't we really care about the enum values?

If you are using lodash, this is actually as simple as:

_.sample(Object.values(myEnum)) as MyEnum

The casting is unfortunately necessary as this returns a type of any. :(

If you're not using lodash, or you want this as its own function, we can still get a type-safe random enum by modifying @Steven Spungin's answer to look like:

function randomEnum<T>(anEnum: T): T[keyof T] {
  const enumValues = (Object.values(anEnum) as unknown) as T[keyof T][];
  const randomIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * enumValues.length);
  return enumValues[randomIndex];
}
2
  • what is myEnum in your lodash example?
    – vivekmore
    Jan 18, 2021 at 17:53
  • Something weird happens with Object.values(myEnum) - it returns an array of mixed strings and numbers like ['Red', 'Green', 'Blue', 0, 1, 2] for the Colors enum above. Object.keys does the same except the number are also strings in that case: ['Red', 'Green', 'Blue', '0', '1', '2']
    – Lewy Blue
    Sep 24, 2021 at 7:48
5

How about this, using Object.values from es2017 (not supported by IE and support in other browsers is more recent):

function randEnumValue<T>(enumObj: T): T[keyof T] {
  const enumValues = Object.values(enumObj);
  const index = Math.floor(Math.random() * enumValues.length);
  
  return enumValues[index];
}
0
5

So no answer did work for me, I end up doing like this:

having the following enum

export enum Jokenpo {
  PAPER = 'PAPER',
  ROCK = 'ROCK',
  SCISSOR = 'SCISSOR',
}

to random select

const index= Math.floor(Math.random() * Object.keys(Jokenpo).length);
const value= Object.values(Jokenpo)[index];

return Jokenpo[value];

I'm just getting a random value from the enums and using it to convert to the real thing.

2

This is the best I could come up with, but it looks like a hack and depends on the implementation of enum in TypeScript, which I'm not sure is guaranteed to stay the same.

Given an enumeration such as

enum Color { Red, Green, Blue }

if we console.log it, we get the following output.

{
  '0': 'Red',
  '1': 'Green',
  '2': 'Blue',
  Red: 0,
  Green: 1,
  Blue: 2,
}

This means we can go through this object's keys and grab only numeric values, like this:

const enumValues = Object.keys(Color)
  .map(n => Number.parseInt(n))
  .filter(n => !Number.isNaN(n))

In our case, enumValues is now [0, 1, 2]. We now only have to pick one of these, at random. There's a good implementation of a function which returns a random integer between two values, which is exactly what we need to randomly select an index.

const randomIndex = getRandomInt(0, enumValues.length)

Now we just pick the random enumeration value:

const randomEnumValue = enumValues[randomIndex]
3
  • TSLint gives the error: TS2322: Type 'number' is not assignable to type 'Color' on your last line
    – jarodsmk
    May 31, 2018 at 7:20
  • Hmm, maybe something changed in the meantime or we have different compiler flags. Unfortunately I am currently unable to test it out, and I don't think I remember what version this was. :/ May 31, 2018 at 15:20
  • Darn, no worries :/ I'm working on a different solution myself - I'm also using SonarTS alongside TSLint which has pretty strict rules
    – jarodsmk
    Jun 1, 2018 at 7:35
2

If you need to support string or heterogeneous enums, I might suggest a function like this:

const randomEnumKey = enumeration => {
  const keys = Object.keys(enumeration)
    .filter(k => !(Math.abs(Number.parseInt(k)) + 1));
  const enumKey = keys[Math.floor(Math.random() * keys.length)];
  
  return enumKey;
};

To get a random value:

const randomEnumValue = (enumeration) => enumeration[randomEnumKey(enumeration)];

Or simply:

MyEnum[randomEnumKey(MyEnum)]

Example:

https://stackblitz.com/edit/typescript-random-enum

1
2

EDIT: Fixed type issue.

Tidying up @ShailendraSingh's answer a bit, if the enum is defined as in the question, without any custom indexes, then this is a simple approach:

enum Color {
  Red, Green, Blue
}
  
function getRandomColor(): Color {
  var key = Math.floor(Math.random() * Object.keys(Color).length / 2);
  return Color[key];
}

Note that the return type Color here (as requested in the question) is actually the enum index and not a color name.

2
  • TS Lint gives the error: TS2322: Type 'number' is not assignable to type 'Color'
    – jarodsmk
    May 31, 2018 at 7:18
  • 2
    That's not linter, that's Typescript itself. May 22, 2019 at 21:11
1

In addition to @sarink answer.

import _ from 'lodash';

export function getRandomValueFromEnum<E>(enumeration: { [s: string]: E } | ArrayLike<E>): E {
  return _.sample(Object.values(enumeration)) as E;
}
1

You can find below code to get things done.

enum Colors {
  Red,
  blue,
  pink,
  yellow,
  Orange
}

function getRandomColor(): string {
  // returns the length
  const len = (Object.keys(Colors).length / 2) - 1;
  // calculate random number
  const item = (Math.floor(Math.random() * len) + 0);

  return Colors[item];
}
3
  • 1
    This will fail if you specify an enum like enum Colors { Red: 100, Blue } May 29, 2017 at 14:49
  • 4
    yes but i have given the answer for the format specified in question and its work perfectly fine for that. May 29, 2017 at 19:41
  • @LazarLjubenović it looks like for that, you could do const item = Math.floor(Math.random() * Object.keys(Colors).length); const i2 = Object.keys(Colors)[item]; return Colors[i2]; Mar 22, 2018 at 15:31
0

Here is a solution that worked for me in ES5:

function getRandomEnum<T extends object>(anEnum: T): T[keyof T] {
  const enumValues = Object.keys(anEnum)
    .filter(key => typeof anEnum[key as keyof typeof anEnum] === 'number')
    .map(key => key);
 
  const randomIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * enumValues.length)
  
  return anEnum[randomIndex as keyof T];
}
3
  • Can you explain what's different than other answers and why is ES5 relevant? Dec 10, 2019 at 16:14
  • 1
    Number.parseInt() and Number.isNan() does not exist on type 'NumberConstructor' when I target ES5 in TypeScript. I also had trouble when leaving out <T extends object> in the signature! The solution of this question works nice if you target greater than ES5. I guess the javascript file still will work, but wanted to remove the linter errors.
    – wulf11
    Dec 11, 2019 at 9:57
  • why this code returns a random number sometimes? Aug 4, 2021 at 17:13
0

It is not perfect, but could try something like this..

function getRandomEnum(input: object): any {
  const inputTransform: { [key: string]: string } = input as { [key: string]: string };
  const keysToArray = Object.keys(inputTransform);
  const valuesToArray = keysToArray.map(key => inputTransform[key]);

  if (!isNaN(parseInt(keysToArray[0], 10))) {
    const len = keysToArray.length;

    while (keysToArray.length !== len / 2) {
      keysToArray.shift();
      valuesToArray.shift();
    }
  }

  const randIndex = Math.floor(keysToArray.length * Math.random());

  return valuesToArray[randIndex];
}

Tested with...

enum Names {
  foo,
  bar,
  baz,
  // foo = "fooZZZ",
  // bar = "barZZZ",
  // baz = "bazZZZ",
}

for (let i = 0; i < 10; i += 1) {
  const result = getRandomEnum(Names);
  if (result === Names.foo) console.log(`${result} is foo`);
  else if (result === Names.bar) console.log(`${result} is bar`);
  else if (result === Names.baz) console.log(`${result} is baz`);
}

Outputs...

0 is foo
0 is foo
2 is baz
0 is foo
2 is baz
2 is baz
1 is bar
1 is bar
2 is baz
1 is bar

or...

bazZZZ is baz
bazZZZ is baz
bazZZZ is baz
barZZZ is bar
bazZZZ is baz
barZZZ is bar
barZZZ is bar
fooZZZ is foo
barZZZ is bar
fooZZZ is foo
0
enum Colors {
  Red, Green, Blue
}

const keys = Object.keys(Colors)
const real_keys = keys.slice(keys.length / 2,keys.length)
const random =  real_keys[Math.floor(Math.random()*real_keys.length)]
console.log(random)

Tested on TypeScript 3.5.2 using ESNext. It's quite simple.

Bonus using namespace

enum Colors {
  Red,
  Green,
  Blue,
}
namespace Colors {
  // You need to minus the function inside your namespace
  // That's why I had - 1
  // Because instead of 0,1,2,red,green,blue = 6
  // It will be 0,1,2,red,green,blue,Random = 7
  export function Random(): any {
    const length = ((Object.keys(Colors).length - 1) / 2)
    return Colors[Math.floor(Math.random() * length / 2)]
  }
}

console.log(Colors.Random())
0

Ease solution that works with all types of enums

function randomEnum<T extends Record<string, number | string>>(anEnum: T): T[keyof T] {
  const enumValues = getEnumValues(anEnum);
  const randomIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * enumValues.length);
        
  return enumValues[randomIndex];
}

Used lodash, but function can be rewritten without it

function getEnumValues<T extends Record<string, number | string>>(anEnum: T): Array<T[keyof T]> {
  const enumClone = _.clone(anEnum);

  _.forEach(enumClone, (_value: number | string, key: string) => {
      if (!isNaN(Number(key))) {
        delete enumClone[key];
      }
    });

  return _.values(enumClone) as Array<T[keyof T]>;
}

enum Status { active, pending }
enum Type { active = 'active', pending = 'pending' } 
enum Mixed { active = 'active', pending = 1 }

randomEnum(Status) // (Return random between 0,1) 
randomEnum(Type) // (Return 'active' or 'pending' string) 
randomEnum(Mixed) // (Return 'active' or 1)
0

A solution based on @Steven Spungin answer, and skipping the unnecessary filtering:

function randomEnum<T>(anEnum: T): T[keyof T] {
    const enumValues = Object.keys(anEnum) as T[keyof T][];
    const randomIndex = Math.floor(Math.random() * enumValues.length / 2);
    return enumValues[randomIndex];
}
-1

this is working for me.

enum Colors {
  Red = 'Red', 
  Green = 'Green', 
  Blue = 'Blue',
};

function getRandomInt(min: number, max: number) {
  return Math.floor(Math.random() * max) + min;
}

const colorKeys = Object.keys(Colors) as (keyof typeof Colors)[];

const randomColor = Colors[
  colorKeys[
    getRandomInt(0, colorKeys.length)
  ]
];
1
  • 1
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    – Community Bot
    Jun 8, 2022 at 12:48

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