0

I just wanted to know , I've searched everywhere in the documentation , but does LLVM have any support for non-concrete types ?

By non-concrete I mean , type like "iN" until runtime and then probably a sort of monomorphization pass ( see example below ) can be run to concretize the "iN" types to something like "i56" depending on the runtime parameters.

I do NOT wish to use the LLVM ORC JIT API , which would simplify everything, but not something that I wish to use.

Here is an example scenario for the transformation i need to apply. (Please Note that the language below is a custom language for which Im trying to build a compiler in LLVM).

( There can be many tricky cases but this is a basic example scenario. I have considered constructing a SSA form for my custom language at AST level but I would like to explore any possible options in the LLVM IR before making my own custom SSA form )

Before Transformation - 

(bits(datasize )) AddWithCarry(Boolean a)
{ 
    integer datasize =if a
                    then 5;
                    else 9;

    bits(datasize) res ;

    return res;

}



(integer)main()
{
        test(argv[1]); // command line argument

}

//===============================


After Transformation

(bits(datasize)) AddWithCarry(Boolean a)
{ 
       if a
            then 
             bits(5) res ;
             return res;
       else  
             bits(9) res ;
             return res;


}


(integer)main()
{
        test(argv[1]); // command line argument

}
1

No. LLVM IR is low-level, so all the types should be concrete. All the high-level transformations should be performed inside a frontend. If you'd need changes to be performed during the runtime, then some sort of JIT would be required.

  • I am aware of the usage of JIT , that would be much simpler. However , I need to do it without using the JIT so I was wondering if there was a way to do it without making a custom SSA for my custom language... – mal May 29 '17 at 15:27
  • Sorry , I meant custom SSA form for the AST of my language. – mal May 31 '17 at 11:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.