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this is my first time posting so apologies if it's not perfect. I'm working on a program to determine the sum, multiple, and exponential values of a pair of integers. I've got my code running okay unless I place either a 0 or 1 in the input, then the program just seems to loop in the CalculatePower procedure. My assumption is that these values cause the ECX counter to go below 0, but I can't seem to sort out how to fix it. It also seems to run somewhat slowly, so I'm also wondering if someone might have a suggestion to make it more efficient. Thanks!

 TITLE Two Integer Calculator          (example.asm)

 ; This program accepts two positive integers and calculates a sum, product, and power from the integers

 INCLUDE Irvine32.inc     ; Using procedure calls ReadInt, WriteInt, and WriteString

 .data

 ReadInt proto
 WriteInt proto
 WriteString proto

 prompt BYTE "Enter a positive integer: ",0   ; Text to prompt user for a positive integer
 sum BYTE "The sum is: ",0     ; Text preceeding the sum result
 product BYTE 0dh, 0ah, "The product is: ",0  ; Text preceeding the product result
 power BYTE 0dh, 0ah, "The power result is: ",0    ; Text preceeding the power value result
 spacer BYTE 0dh,0ah, " ",0dh,0ah,0      ; Takes the place of procedure call Crlf to place space between program and wait message
 integer DWORD ? ; The user-entered integer

 .code

 main PROC
 ; Asks for and receives the first integer from the user, moves it to EBX
 call GetInteger
 mov ebx,eax


 ; Receives the second integer from the user and moves it into the 'integer' variable
 call GetInteger
 mov integer,eax


 ; Adds the values in the EAX and EBX registers together, then displays the sum
 call AddNumbers
 mov edx,OFFSET sum
 call WriteString
 call WriteInt


 ; Reloads the original user-entered integer to the EAX register, multiplies the EAX and EBX reigsters, then displays the product
 mov eax,integer
 call MultiplyNumbers
 mov edx,OFFSET product
 call WriteString
 call WriteInt


 ; Reloads the original user-entered integer to the EAX register, then calculates the value stored in EAX to the power of the value in the EBX register
 mov eax,integer
 call CalculatePower
 mov edx,OFFSET power
 call WriteString
 call WriteInt

 ; Inserts a line of separation between program and the wait message
 mov edx,OFFSET spacer
 call WriteString

 exit
 main ENDP




 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
 GetInteger PROC
 ; Prompts the user to enter an integer, assuming that the
 ; user will enter valid, positive integers. Stores the
 ; user-entered integer in EAX
 ; Receives: 
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------

      mov edx, OFFSET prompt ; Prompts the user to enter an (assumed positive) integer
      call WriteString    ; Displays the string prompt to enter a positive integer
      call ReadInt   ; Stores the user-input integer in EAX

      ret
 GetInteger ENDP     ; End of UDP GetInteger




 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
 AddNumbers PROC
 ; Accepts two integers in EAX and EBX then adds the two
 ; integers together, storing the sum in EAX.
 ; Receives: EAX, EBX
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------

      add eax,ebx    ; adds the two integers together, sum is stored in EAX

      ret
 AddNumbers ENDP




 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
 MultiplyNumbers PROC USES ecx
 ; Accepts two integers in EAX and EBX. Uses the AddNumbers
 ; procedure to multiply the two numbers, then stores the
 ; product in EAX.
 ; Receives: EAX, EBX
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------

      mov ecx,eax
      dec ecx
      mov eax,ebx

      multiply:
           call AddNumbers
           loop multiply

      ret
 MultiplyNumbers ENDP




 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
 CalculatePower PROC
 ; Accepts two integers in EAX and EBX, then uses the
 ; MultiplyNumbers procedure to calculate the integer in EAX
 ; to the power of the integer in EBX. The result is stored
 ; in the EAX register.
 ; Receives: EAX, EBX, ECX
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------

      mov ecx,eax
      dec ecx
      mov eax,ebx

      exponent:
           call MultiplyNumbers
           loop exponent

      ret
 CalculatePower ENDP

 END main
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  • 1
    Is there a particular reason why you are calling AddNumbers in a loop to multiply, instead of using the mul instruction? Is this for a school assignment where you are only allowed to use a certain subset of instructions, like everything has to be implemented in terms of add, inc, and dec? If so, these requirements should be stated explicitly in the question, otherwise the answers will inevitably not be very useful to you. :-) – Cody Gray May 29 '17 at 10:52
  • Yeah, it's a stupid requirement for the assignment - I will make sure to include that if I have to reach out again. Apparently whoever wrote out that the program needed to take "positive integers" didn't actually want you to consider either 0 or 1, and none of the professors or students have actually noticed this. – Sarah Koch May 30 '17 at 8:48
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Although it wasn't explicitly mentioned in the question, you did confirm in a comment that the assignment requires that you only use addition and subtraction. Otherwise, you would definitely want to use the mul/imul instructions for this. They are slower (less efficient) than addition/subtraction, but they are much faster than looping and doing repeated additions! Not to mention they make the code significantly easier to read and write, and therefore less buggy. With that stipulated, let's look at the core functions you have written.


 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
 AddNumbers PROC
 ; Accepts two integers in EAX and EBX then adds the two
 ; integers together, storing the sum in EAX.
 ; Receives: EAX, EBX
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
      add eax,ebx    ; adds the two integers together, sum is stored in EAX
      ret
 AddNumbers ENDP

This is actually a really good start. You are commenting your function definitions with all the information that is required about their calling convention, including what registers parameters are passed in and what registers the results are returned in. Too many beginning assembly-language programmers don't do this, and their code turns into an inscrutable mess.

The AddNumbers procedure is correct as written, but since it is so simple (only a single instruction other than the ret), I would have written it as a macro. If you know C, a macro is just like a preprocessor macro there: the assembler basically just copy-pastes the stuff from the macro into the place where you use it. Basic text substitution. This is really powerful because it saves the overhead of a function call (no need for a call or a ret), but you want to use macros sparingly because they can also bloat the code. Fewer than 3 instructions, though, and it's a clear case for a macro. But maybe you haven't learned about macros yet and aren't supposed to be using them. If not, ignore this advice. :-)


 ;-----------------------------------------------------------
 MultiplyNumbers PROC USES ecx
 ; Accepts two integers in EAX and EBX. Uses the AddNumbers
 ; procedure to multiply the two numbers, then stores the
 ; product in EAX.
 ; Receives: EAX, EBX
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------

      mov ecx,eax
      dec ecx
      mov eax,ebx

      multiply:
           call AddNumbers
           loop multiply

      ret
 MultiplyNumbers ENDP

This doesn't return the correct result if one of the inputs is 0 or 1.

If the assignment guarantees that the inputs will be positive integers, then mathematically, 0 is not a positive integer, so you don't have to worry about that case. (In real-world code, I'd want to add an assertion that verifies the inputs are non-zero, like a test that is conditionally included only in debugging/testing builds.)

But you still need to worry about an input of 1. To see why, let's think through the flow of the code with an example. Say EAX is 1 and EBX is 4. This should return 4, because 1 × 4 = 4. Unfortunately, it actually returns 8. The counter, ECX, is set to 0, but because AddNumbers is called before the counter is checked (by the LOOP instruction), AddNumbers always runs once. To fix this, you need to check the counter before entering the loop.

If you know C, what you have here now is basically a do { … } while (condition) loop. What you want is basically a while (condition) { … } loop. The condition needs to be checked at the top of the loop, not at the bottom.

The correct code would look like this:

      mov  ecx, eax
      dec  ecx              ; ECX = (EAX - 1)
      jz   finished         ; bail out early if ECX == 0
      mov  eax, ebx         ; EAX = EBX
  multiply:
      call AddNumbers       ; EAX += EBX
      loop multiply         ; decrement counter and keep looping if != 0
  finished:
      ret

Except that you should avoid using the very slow LOOP instruction. Instead, replace it with the equivalent expanded form (DEC + JNZ), which is significantly faster:

      mov  ecx, eax
      dec  ecx              ; ECX = (EAX - 1)
      jz   finished         ; bail out early if ECX == 0
      mov  eax, ebx         ; EAX = EBX
  multiply:
      call AddNumbers       ; EAX += EBX
      dec  ecx              ; decrement counter
      jnz  multiply         ; keep looping if counter != 0
  finished:
      ret

This is a somewhat counter-intuitive case where more instructions actually result in faster code. Your teacher probably taught you LOOP because it is conceptually simple, but no real-world code ever uses it, whether written by an assembly-language programmer or generated by a compiler, because the expanded form is much faster. You can basically forget that the LOOP instruction even exists. It's only useful when you're optimizing for size above all else, which is rarely done, especially when hand-writing assembly code.

Another bonus optimization tip is code like:

mov  ecx, eax
dec  ecx

can sometimes be replaced by the multipurpose LEA instruction, which does the move and decrement in a single step:

lea  ecx, [eax - 1]

For complicated reasons, it varies whether this will actually be faster in the real world, but it won't be any slower, and it's a useful trick to know. (Compilers love to use it, as do expert assembly hackers.) The only caveat is that LEA doesn't set flags like DEC does, which is why you can't use it here (you need the flags set in order to conditionally branch—JZ, JNZ, etc.).

If you'd followed my earlier advice and turned the AddNumbers function into a macro, the assembler would generate this code:

      mov  ecx, eax
      dec  ecx              ; ECX = (EAX - 1)
      jz   finished         ; bail out early if ECX == 0
      mov  eax, ebx         ; EAX = EBX
  multiply:
      add  eax, ebx         ; inline expansion of AddNumbers macro
      dec  ecx              ; decrement counter
      jnz  multiply         ; keep looping if counter != 0
  finished:
      ret

That's about as optimal as you're going to get without either (A) being able to use a multiply instruction, or (B) unrolling the loop (and therefore making the code a lot more complicated, for very little gain). The necessity of looping is inevitably going to make this code dog-slow. That's a good lesson that micro-optimization can only go so far. If you've chosen a bad/inefficient algorithm, then you're doomed to slow code no matter how much you try and tweak it.


;-----------------------------------------------------------
 CalculatePower PROC
 ; Accepts two integers in EAX and EBX, then uses the
 ; MultiplyNumbers procedure to calculate the integer in EAX
 ; to the power of the integer in EBX. The result is stored
 ; in the EAX register.
 ; Receives: EAX, EBX, ECX
 ; Returns: EAX
 ;-----------------------------------------------------------

      mov ecx,eax
      dec ecx
      mov eax,ebx

      exponent:
           call MultiplyNumbers
           loop exponent

      ret
 CalculatePower ENDP

The bug here is essentially the same as the bug we uncovered in MultiplyNumbers, except compounded by the fact that CalculatePower calls MultiplyNumbers. Fortunately, the fix is also the same.

Also, you're basing your counter off of the wrong input. If we're calculating EAXEBX, then we want to base the counter off of EBX.

      mov  ecx, ebx
      dec  ecx              ; ECX = (EBX - 1)
      jz   finished         ; bail out early if ECX == 0
      mov  ebx, eax         ; EBX = EAX
  exponent:
      call MultiplyNumbers  ; EAX *= EBX
      dec  ecx              ; decrement counter
      jnz  exponent         ; keep looping if counter != 0
  finished:
      ret

To see that this is correct, think through some examples—or better yet, single-step through some in a debugger!

  • If we are calculating 51, then ECX will be set to 1−1 (== 0), the loop will be skipped, and the result (EAX) will be 5.
  • If we are calculating 52, then ECX will be set to 2−1 (== 1), the loop will iterate one time, and the result (EAX) will be 5×5 (== 25).
  • If we are calculating 15, then ECX will be set to 5−1 (== 4), the loop will iterate four times, and the result (EAX) will be 1×1×1×1×1 (== 1).

Again, though this code will be very slow, there is no real way to optimize it further. Since it's logic is so complicated (so many instructions), you wouldn't even want to turn MultiplyNumbers into a macro. The overhead of its internal loop vastly outweighs the overhead of a function call, so there wouldn't be any performance win to expanding the code inline, even if you were willing to trade code bloat for speed.

So again, we see that a good algorithm is the real key to writing efficient code. Your code implements an iterated-multiplication algorithm to do exponentiation. Computing ab this way requires b − 1 multiplications. But there are algorithms that can do it much more efficiently. The standard technique is called exponentiation by squaring. For example, if you wanted to compute a15, you could do:

a^3  = (a * a * a)
a^7  = (a^3) * (a^3) * a
a^15 = (a^7) * (a^7) * a

This requires a total of 6 multiplications, as compared to the 14 multiplications that would be required for iterated multiplication—an improvement of more than two-fold!

Just for fun, assuming that you could use multiplication instructions, you could apply this algorithm to write CalculatePower as follows:

; Calculates EAX^EBX via exponentiation by squaring.
; Returns result in EAX.
; Clobbers: EBX, ECX
   mov  ecx, 1        ; ECX holds result; initialize to 1
   test ebx, ebx      ; is the exponent zero?
   jz   finished      ; if so, skip everything and return result (1)
check_even:
   test ebx, 1        ; test lowest bit (sets flags according to result of EBX % 2)
   jz   skip          ; skip next instruction if exponent is even (EBX % 2 == 0)
   imul ecx, eax      ; result *= base
skip:
   imul eax, eax      ; base *= base
   shr  ebx, 1        ; exponent /= 2
   jnz  check_even    ; keep looping if exponent != 0
finished:
   mov  eax, ecx      ; put result in EAX
   ret

But it turns out that this is not even the most efficient way. Going back to our original example of a15, this can actually be done in only 5 multiplications!

a^2  = (a * a)
a^3  = (a^2) * a
a^6  = (a^3) * (a^3)
a^12 = (a^6) * (a^6)
a^15 = (a^12) * (a^3)

Unfortunately, this is not a suitable general approach, since there are no efficient algorithms known for finding the minimal sequence of multiplications required (i.e., the minimal-length addition chain for the exponent). In computer science terms, this problem is NP-complete. Although there are heuristic algorithms available, I've found that even quality optimizing C compilers don't use them. Instead, they will just use the good old exponentiation-by-squaring algorithm to simplify chains of multiplications. For example:

unsigned int To15thPower(unsigned int a)
{
    return (a * a * a *
            a * a * a *
            a * a * a *
            a * a * a *
            a * a * a);
}

would be compiled to code that required 6 multiplications:

To15thPower(unsigned int):    ; parameter is in EAX
    mov     edx, eax
    imul    edx, eax
    imul    edx, eax
    imul    edx, edx
    imul    edx, eax
    imul    edx, edx
    imul    eax, edx
    ret

even though, as we saw, it can actually be done in only 5. To get that optimization, you'd need to write the code to explicitly show the algorithm as it should be implemented:

unsigned int To15thPower_Optimized(unsigned int a)
{
    unsigned int a2  = a * a;
    unsigned int a3  = a2 * a;
    unsigned int a6  = a3 * a3;
    unsigned int a12 = a6 * a6;
    return a12 * a3;
}
To15thPower_Optimized(unsigned int):   ; parameter is in EAX
    mov     edx, eax
    imul    eax, edx
    imul    eax, edx
    mov     edx, eax
    imul    edx, eax
    imul    edx, edx
    imul    eax, edx
    ret

Well, that was both complicated and fun. :-) Hopefully you learned something!

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  • Thanks, Cody! Thank was insanely informative! I managed to get this program working well enough that I got a great grade on it, but the extra info you gave is certainly more than helpful to a new programmer. We haven't tackled macros yet (and I doubt we will in this class), but it's information that will prove helpful in the future. – Sarah Koch Jul 1 '17 at 20:49

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