1

A C++11 implementation of the Dijkstra Algorithm by Michal Forisek does compute the shortest distance quite fast & elegantly with not too much code. But how can I return the path too ?

struct edge
{
    edge(const int _to, const int _len): to(_to), length(_len)
    {

    }

    int to;
    int length;
};

int dijkstra(const vector< vector<edge> > &graph, int source, int target) {
    vector<int> min_distance( graph.size(), INT_MAX );
    min_distance[ source ] = 0;
    set< pair<int,int> > active_vertices;
    active_vertices.insert( {0,source} );

    while (!active_vertices.empty()) {
        int where = active_vertices.begin()->second;
        if (where == target) return min_distance[where];
        active_vertices.erase( active_vertices.begin() );
        for (auto ed : graph[where]) 
            if (min_distance[ed.to] > min_distance[where] + ed.length) {
                active_vertices.erase( { min_distance[ed.to], ed.to } );
                min_distance[ed.to] = min_distance[where] + ed.length;
                active_vertices.insert( { min_distance[ed.to], ed.to } );
            }
    }
    return INT_MAX;
}

int main()
{

    std::vector<edge> node0 {edge(1,1), edge (3,7), edge (2,1)};
    std::vector<edge> node1 {edge(0,1), edge (2,2), edge (3,4)};
    std::vector<edge> node2 {edge(1,2), edge (3,3), edge (0,1)};
    std::vector<edge> node3 {edge(2,3), edge (0,7), edge (1,4)};

    std::vector<std::vector<edge>> graph {node0, node1, node2, node3};

    int r = dijkstra(graph, 0, 3);

return 0;
}
0

Instead of returning:

Starting at the destination, examine all nodes with edges going to it. Pick the node adjacent to the destination with the lowest min distance+ed.length to the destination node. If the adjacent node is not in the min distance map, ignore it.

This is your new destination. Repeat until your destination is your source.

Basically you can greedily walk back to the start, because you know which node is cheapest to get to the start.

This is cheap if your edges are bidirectional, or if you have a way to look up edges backwards.

Otherwise, tracking both min distance and node you came from in the min distance map lets you do it just as easily.

struct edge
{
  int to;
  int length;
};

using node = std::vector<edge>;
using graph = std::vector<node>;
void add_edge( graph& g, int start, int finish, int length ) {
  if ((int)g.size() <= (std::max)(start, finish))
    g.resize( (std::max)(start,finish)+1 );
  g[start].push_back( {finish, length} );
  g[finish].push_back( {start, length} );
}

using path = std::vector<int>;

struct result {
  int distance;
  path p;
};
result dijkstra(const graph &graph, int source, int target) {
  std::vector<int> min_distance( graph.size(), INT_MAX );
  min_distance[ source ] = 0;
  std::set< std::pair<int,int> > active_vertices;
  active_vertices.insert( {0,source} );

  while (!active_vertices.empty()) {
    int where = active_vertices.begin()->second;
    if (where == target)
    {
      int cost = min_distance[where];
      // std::cout << "cost is " << cost << std::endl;
      path p{where};
      while (where != source) {
        int next = where;
        for (edge e : graph[where])
        {
          // std::cout << "examine edge from " << where << "->" << e.to << " length " << e.length << ":";

          if (min_distance[e.to] == INT_MAX)
          {
            // std::cout << e.to << " unexplored" << std::endl;
            continue;
          }

          if (e.length + min_distance[e.to] != min_distance[where])
          {
            // std::cout << e.to << " not on path" << std::endl;
            continue;
          }
          next = e.to;
          p.push_back(next);
          // std::cout << "backtracked to " << next << std::endl;
          break;
        }
        if (where==next)
        {
          // std::cout << "got lost at " << where << std::endl;
          break;
        }
        where = next;
      }
      std::reverse( p.begin(), p.end() );
      return {cost, std::move(p)};
    }
    active_vertices.erase( active_vertices.begin() );
    for (auto ed : graph[where]) 
      if (min_distance[ed.to] > min_distance[where] + ed.length) {
        active_vertices.erase( { min_distance[ed.to], ed.to } );
        min_distance[ed.to] = min_distance[where] + ed.length;
        active_vertices.insert( { min_distance[ed.to], ed.to } );
      }
  }
  return {INT_MAX};
}

int main()
{
  graph g;
  add_edge(g, 0, 1, 1);
  add_edge(g, 0, 3, 7);
  add_edge(g, 0, 2, 1);
  add_edge(g, 1, 2, 2);
  add_edge(g, 1, 3, 4);
  add_edge(g, 2, 3, 3);


  auto r = dijkstra(g, 0, 3);
  std::cout << "cost is " << r.distance << ": ";
  for (int x:r.p) {
    std::cout << x << " then ";
  }
  std::cout << "and we are done.\n";

  return 0;
}

Live example.

3

You can make it return the shortest path by creating a "parents" list. Basically, this list will hold the parent of each vertex you track. By parent, I mean that for any vertex, the parent of that vertex is the node previous to it in the shortest path. When you update the min_distance list, you should also update the "parents" list by setting the parent of your vertex "ed.to" to "where". Then you can return the parents list and trace through it to find the shortest path. Simply visit the goal node's parent, and move sequentially until you find a node whose parent is the source. That's your path.

  • What seems to be the problem with it? – Jayson Boubin May 29 '17 at 22:45
  • @madhatter take a look at the edit now. This works fine for me. If you can't run this one then I don't know if I can help you. – Jayson Boubin May 29 '17 at 23:29
  • Path from 0 to 2 in my example should be 0,2. Not 0,1,3. – user1197918 May 30 '17 at 11:14

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