57

The question is can enum be used as a key type instead of only "number" or "string" ? Currently it seems like the only possible declaration is x:{[key:number]:any} where key can be of type "number" or "string". Is it possible to make something like in this example:

Example:

enum MyEnum
{
    First,
    Second
}

var layer:{[key:MyEnum]:any};
1
  • Hivaga, you might want to consider accepting Hugo Elhaj-Lahsen's answer as it's a less verbose approach than the current answer for TS 2.9+ – KyleMit Apr 7 at 0:49
90

Yes. Just type

let layer:{[key in keyof typeof MyEnum]: any}

The keyof keyword is available since Typescript 2.1. See the TypeScript documentation for more details. Using only keyof for enums wouldn't work (you'd get the keys of the enum type and not the enum constants), so you have to type keyof typeof.

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8
  • This seems like exactly what I was looking for. Tnx – Hivaga May 29 '17 at 14:40
  • @Sebastian but in this case the value of layer can be { third: 123 } if we assign it this way: layer.third = 123, can't it? Is it possible to define a type of an object, whose keys can only be string keys of an enum (in this case First and Second)? – Eduard Jul 11 '18 at 16:54
  • I don't understand. Why whould you be able to add a property "third"? – Sebastian Jul 12 '18 at 7:12
  • 7
    And if you don't want all the Enum values to be included forcefully, you can do {[key in keyof typeof MyEnum]?: any} (the ? makes absence of some enums, fine.) – Aidin Dec 6 '19 at 10:31
  • Thanks fro the answer. Very useful. – Minkesh Jain Sep 28 '20 at 11:38
45

Short Answer:

let layer: Partial<Record<MyEnum, any>>;

Long Answer (with details):

I had the same problem. I wanted to have the following piece of code work.

enum MyEnum {
    xxx = "xxx",
    yyy = "yyy",
    zzz = "zzz",
}

type myType = ...; // Fill here

const o: myType = { // keys should be in MyEnum, values: number
   [MyEnum.xxx]: 2,
   "hi": 5, // <--- Error: complain on this one, as "hi" is not in enum
}

o[MyEnum.yyy] = 8; // Allow it to be modified later

Starting from the other answer on this question, I got to:

type myType = {[key in keyof typeof MyEnum]: number};

But it would nag that o is missing "yyy". So I needed to tell it that the object is going to have some of the enum keys, not all of them. So I got to add ? to get:

type myType = {[key in keyof typeof MyEnum]?: number};

It was working fine, until I added the line at the end of the code to modify the object after its first creation. Now it was complaining that the type inherited through keyof has its properties as readonly and I cannot touch them after the first creation! :| In fact, hovering over myType in Typescript Playground, it will be shown as:

type myType = {
    readonly xxx?: number | undefined;
    readonly yyy?: number | undefined;
    readonly zzz?: number | undefined;
}

Now, to remove that unwanted readonly, I found that I can use:

type myType = {-readonly [key in keyof typeof myEnum1]?: number };

Quite ugly, but working!

Until I played with Typescript Utility Types, and found what I wanted!

type myType = Partial<Record<MyEnum, number>>;

:)

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4
  • that looks good, but my problem as that all of your myType values must have the same type (in your example number). I'd like to be able to do something like: type myType = { readonly xxx?: number; readonly yyy?: string; } any idea if that's possible? – SudoPlz Nov 27 '20 at 21:28
  • @SudoPlz I'd suggest opening up a new question for that. The question here is "how to limit the keys to be of an Enum". Yours is different I believe. Yet, as a wild guess, either Partial<Record<MyEnum, number|string> should work for you or Partial<Record<MyEnum,number>> | { yyy?: string}, maybe. – Aidin Dec 5 '20 at 10:43
  • Nice one but the problem with this solution is that number can be undefined – walox Jun 4 at 15:47
  • @walox Typescript had a problem distinguishing undefined and missing/optional -- see github.com/microsoft/TypeScript/issues/13195. It seems like recently (since a month ago! you can pass a flag to catch it: github.com/microsoft/TypeScript/pull/43947) – Aidin Jun 5 at 1:45
20
+400

Since 2018, there is an easier way in Typescript, without using keyof typeof:

let layer: { [key in MyEnum]: any}

To not have to include all keys:

let layer: { [key in MyEnum]?: any}
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2
  • 2
    It seems to work great. When using 'typeof', it looks like, a key in my object was created from a key of an enum, not a value of this key. – Aleks Grunwald Feb 22 at 10:50
  • If i try to define an interface with same structure, it doesn't work. Any idea ? typescriptlang.org/play?#code/… – Sachin Gupta Jun 1 at 21:10
6

For those who are seeking for a way to get the keys of the enum instead its value, you just need to change from this:

type myType = Partial<Record<MyEnum, number>>;

to that:

type myType = Partial<Record<keyof typeof MyEnum, number>>;
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2

actually it worked with me without any workaround.

here is some cases:

enum EnumString {
  a="a",
  b="b"
}

enum EnumNum {
  a,
  b
}

type Type = "a" | "b"


let x1:{[k in EnumString]?:any }={a:1} //working
let x2:{[k in EnumNum]?:any }={a:1} //error: Type '{ a: number; }' is not assignable to type '{ 0?: any; 1?: any; }'
let x3:{[k in Type]?:any }={a:1} //working; defining a union type is easer than defining an enum string 

let y1:{[k: EnumString]?:any }={a:1}
let y2:{[k: EnumNum]?:any }={a:1}
let y3:{[k in Type]?:any }={a:1}

let z1:{[k in keyof typeof EnumString]?:any }={a:1}
let z2:{[k in keyof typeof EnumNum]?:any }={a:1}
let z3:{[k: keyof typeof Type]?:any }={a:1}

it is important to note that the case "z1", even it works well, but you cannot modify it later as it is a read only. you can use the keyword -readonly to remove this constraint.

x1.a=2 
x3.a=2
z1.a=2 //error: read only

I created a typescript playground to see issues of different cases yourself

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