0

The semicolon at the end of the for loop is suppose to empty the body and create a null loop. But why this is printing 6?

void main()
{
    int i;
    for(i=1;i<=5;i++);
    {
        printf("%d\n",i);
    }
}
6
  • 2
    It makes null loop(do nothing), but it does increment i to 6, and so after loop ends next print statement is executed May 29 '17 at 18:27
  • 1
    You probably wanted to ask why there was only one number printed instead of 5, or you really don't get loops.
    – zubergu
    May 29 '17 at 18:28
  • 1
    It would be more accurate to say that the empty statement terminated by the semicolon is the loop body. This is not some kind of special case or magic significance of the semicolon. It simply creates a for loop whose body does nothing, but that works in all respects like any other for loop. May 29 '17 at 18:29
  • Yoiu have a loop. What do you expect? May 29 '17 at 18:32
  • @zubergu no i know loops,i am asking why it is printing 6 now i got it. May 29 '17 at 18:35
11

The loop body is empty, otherwise it would print 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. But the loop head runs nethertheless and in each iteration it increases i. When it reaches 6 which is not <=5 the loop ends. Printing i after the loop prints i as 6. Incrementing i is a side effect of the loop.

1

It is.at the end of the loop i will be 6 and the printf does this.

1

The for loop for(i=1;i<=5;i++); will run exactly 5 times, incrementing i from 1 to 6 (even though the for loop body is a no-op). Thus, in here:

{
    printf("%d\n",i);
}

the program will print the current value of i, that is 6.

1

Because you declare the int outside the null loop, the value is saved outside the increment loop.

Read more about it here

The extra brackets do not do anything here because the semicolon exits the loop.

Read more about brackets here.

0
1

Try this for fun

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 1; i <= 5; i++) /* void */;

    /* floating block one */
    {
        int i = 42; /* new i, hides old i */
        printf("%d\n",i);
    }

    /* floating block two */
    {
        printf("%d\n",i);
    }
}
7
  • Explain me this @pmg May 29 '17 at 18:43
  • @Magnus see this void main() { int i; for(i=1;i<=5;i++); { int i = 42; printf("%d\n",i); } printf("%d\n",i); } May 29 '17 at 18:49
  • It should print 42 42,but printing 42 6 May 29 '17 at 18:50
  • 1
    The second definition of i (the 42), inside the "floating" block, creates a different variable efectively hiding the first one (there are two is, but you can only access the innermost). When that block finishes, the other "floating" block starts with the previous i in scope.
    – pmg
    May 29 '17 at 18:52
  • How can it get back the previous valur that is "2"?It is supposed to be replaced with 42. May 29 '17 at 18:55
1

it is quite simple:

for(i=1;i<=5;i++); will be executed 5 times, from 1 to 5 then i=6 ends the for loop and then a new "scoped" statement is executed:

printf("%d\n",i);

therefore prints 6

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