4

Description

ifelse() function allows to filter the values in a vector through a series of tests, each of them producing different actions in case of a positive result. For instance, let xx be a data.frame, as follows:

xx <- data.frame(a=c(1,2,1,3), b=1:4)
xx

a b
1 1
2 2
1 3
3 4

Suppose that you want to create a new column, c, from column b, but depending on the values in column a in the following way:

For each row,

  • if the value in column a is 1, the value in column c, is the same value in column b.
  • if the value in column a is 2, the value in column c, is 100 times the value in column b.
  • in any other case, the value in column c is the negative of the value in column b.

Using ifelse(), a solution could be:

xx$c <- ifelse(xx$a==1, xx$b, 
               ifelse(xx$a==2, xx$b*100,
                      -xx$b))
xx

a b c
1 1 1
2 2 200
1 3 3
3 4 -4

Problem 1

An aesthetic problem arises when the number of tests increases, say, four tests:

xx$c <- ifelse(xx$a==1, xx$b, 
           ifelse(xx$a==2, xx$b*100,
                  ifelse(xx$a==3, ...,
                         ifelse(xx$a==4, ...,
                                ...))))

I found partial solution to the problem in this page, which consists in the definition of the functions if.else_(), i_(), e_(), as follows:

library(lazyeval)
i_ <- function(if_stat, then) {
    if_stat <- lazyeval::expr_text(if_stat)
    then    <- lazyeval::expr_text(then)
    sprintf("ifelse(%s, %s, ", if_stat, then)
}

e_ <- function(else_ret) {
    else_ret <- lazyeval::expr_text(else_ret)
    else_ret
}

if.else_ <- function(...) {
    args <- list(...)

    for (i in 1:(length(args) - 1) ) {
        if (substr(args[[i]], 1, 6) != "ifelse") {
            stop("All but the last argument, need to be if.then_ functions.", call. = FALSE)
        }
    }
    if (substr(args[[length(args)]], 1, 6) == "ifelse"){
        stop("Last argument needs to be an else_ function.", call. = FALSE)
    }
    args$final <- paste(rep(')', length(args) - 1), collapse = '')
    eval_string <- do.call('paste', args)
    eval(parse(text = eval_string))
}

In this way, the problem given in the Description, can be rewritten as follows:

xx <- data.frame(a=c(1,2,1,3), b=1:4)
xx$c <- if.else_(
    i_(xx$a==1, xx$b),
    i_(xx$a==2, xx$b*100),
    e_(-xx$b)
) 
xx

a b c
1 1 1
2 2 200
1 3 3
3 4 -4

And the code for the four tests will simply be:

xx$c <- if.else_(
    i_(xx$a==1, xx$b),
    i_(xx$a==2, xx$b*100),
    i_(xx$a==3, ...), # dots meaning actions for xx$a==3
    i_(xx$a==4, ...), # dots meaning actions for xx$a==4
    e_(...)           # dots meaning actions for any other case
) 

Problem 2 & Question

The given code apparently solves the problem. Then, I wrote the following test function:

test.ie <- function() {
    dd <- data.frame(a=c(1,2,1,3), b=1:4)
    if.else_(
        i_(dd$a==1, dd$b),
        i_(dd$a==2, dd$b*100),
        e_(-dd$b)
    ) # it should give c(1, 200, 3, -4)
}

When I tried the test:

 test.ie()

it spit the following error message:

Error in ifelse(dd$a == 1, dd$b, ifelse(dd$a == 2, dd$b * 100, -dd$b)) :
object 'dd' not found

Question

Since the if.else_() syntactic constructor is not supposed to run only from the console, is there a way for it to 'know' the variables from the function that calls it?

Note

In "Best way to replace a lengthy ifelse structure in R", a similar problem was posted. However, the given solution there focuses on building the table's new column with the given constant output values (the "then" or "else" slots of the ifelse() function), whereas my case addresses a syntactic problem in which the "then" or "else" slots can even be expressions in terms of other data.frame elements or variables.

1

With full respect to the OP's remarkable effort to improve nested ifelse(), I prefer a different approach which I believe is easy to write, concise, maintainable and fast:

xx <- data.frame(a=c(1L,2L,1L,3L), b=1:4)

library(data.table)
# coerce to data.table, and set the default first
setDT(xx)[, c:= -b]
xx[a == 1L, c := b]        # 1st special case
xx[a == 2L, c := 100L*b]   # 2nd special case, note use of integer 100L
# xx[a == 3L, c := ...]    # other cases
# xx[a == 4L, c := ...]
#...

xx
#   a b   c
#1: 1 1   1
#2: 2 2 200
#3: 1 3   3
#4: 3 4  -4     

Note that for the 2nd special case b is multiplied by the integer constant 100L to make sure that the right hand sides are all of type integer in order to avoid type conversion to double.


Edit 2: This can also be written in an even more concise (but still maintainable) way as a one-liner:

setDT(xx)[, c:= -b][a == 1L, c := b][a == 2L, c := 100*b][]

data.table chaining works here, because c is updated in place so that subsequent expressions are acting on all rows of xx even if the previous expression was a selective update of a subset of rows.


Edit 1: This approach can be implemented with base R as well:

xx <- data.frame(a=c(1L,2L,1L,3L), b=1:4)

xx$c <- -xx$b
idx <- xx$a == 1L; xx$c[idx] <- xx$b[idx]
idx <- xx$a == 2L; xx$c[idx] <- 100 * xx$b[idx]

xx
#  a b   c
#1 1 1   1
#2 2 2 200
#3 1 3   3
#4 3 4  -4
  • Great! When I first approached the nested ifelse () subject, it was because I was looking for some simple syntactic construction similar to the C ++ switch () {case: ...} construct. This answer meets my expectations: it is the most simple, understandable, and, I think, the most efficient way to do it. – JulioSergio May 30 '17 at 14:52
  • @JulioSergio First, I was unsure whether I should post this suggestion which seems to be way off of your question. But thanks to your feedback, I'm glad I did. That's very encouraging! – Uwe May 31 '17 at 3:37
8

I think you can use dplyr::case_when inside dplyr::mutate to achieve this.

library(dplyr)

df <- tibble(a=c(1,2,1,3), b=1:4)

df %>% 
  mutate(
    foo = case_when(
      .$a == 1 ~ .$b,
      .$a == 2 ~ .$b * 100L,
      TRUE   ~ .$b * -1L
    )
  )

#> # A tibble: 4 x 3
#>       a     b   foo
#>   <dbl> <int> <int>
#> 1     1     1     1
#> 2     2     2   200
#> 3     1     3     3
#> 4     3     4    -4

In the upcoming relase of dplyr 0.6.0 you won't need to use the akward work-around of .$, and you can just use:

df %>% 
  mutate(
    foo = case_when(
      a == 1 ~ b,
      a == 2 ~ b * 100L,
      TRUE   ~ b * -1L
    )
  )
  • Please, can you explain what the reason is to wrap all right hand side expressions separately in as.double()? – Uwe May 30 '17 at 14:51
  • Yes, that's because case_when is strict about type, and so for the first line b is an integer, but b * 100 becomes a double, and so everything should be double. The strictness in intended to make the output type more predictable, and makes it somewhat faster. – austensen May 30 '17 at 14:57
  • I see, good point. Thanks for hinting. Perhaps, explicit type conversion to double could be avoided if you multiply with the integer constant 100L to keep the RHS all integer? I just have amended my answer accordingly. – Uwe May 30 '17 at 15:09
  • Yeah, that's definitely true, (I'll update my answer for that). I just was thinking in your real use case it might not be all integer and then it wouldn't work. – austensen May 30 '17 at 15:23
2

Taking into account MrFlick's advice, I re-coded the if.else_() function as follows:

if.else_ <- function(...) {
    args <- list(...)

    for (i in 1:(length(args) - 1) ) {
        if (substr(args[[i]], 1, 6) != "ifelse") {
            stop("All but the last argument, need to be if.then_ functions.", call. = FALSE)
        }
    }
    if (substr(args[[length(args)]], 1, 6) == "ifelse"){
        stop("Last argument needs to be an else_ function.", call. = FALSE)
    }
    args$final <- paste(rep(')', length(args) - 1), collapse = '')
    eval_string <- do.call('paste', args)
    eval(parse(text = eval_string), envir = parent.frame())
}

Now the test.ie() function runs properly

test.ie()

[1] 1 200 3 -4

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